#1
hey, i've recently bought new pedals and noticed my tone getting lost. i've also bought a new power suply (custom made)

so my chain is: Guitar > custom noise gate > blackstar LT drive > joyo EQ > blackstar HT1RH + HT408 cab

is there any obvious problem in my chain, natural decay of tone through pedals or i'm just beeing paranoid ?
#2
Some pedals suck tone noticeably - you have to sell those and replace them with better pedals. Unfortunately, better pedals are more expensive. Start by taking all pedals out of your chain and testing them one by one.

One thing to watch out for - noise gate - this will affect your tone and will cancel out the decay if you set it too high. A gate cuts noise by shutting down the signal for quieter sounds, which unfortunately includes decaying notes.
#3
I solved my tone suck problem by putting a Boss TU-3 tuner that has a buffer at the start of my pedal train. Really nice tuner, too.
#4
Quote by reverb66
(a) Some pedals suck tone noticeably - you have to sell those and replace them with better pedals. (b) Unfortunately, better pedals are more expensive. (c) Start by taking all pedals out of your chain and testing them one by one.

(d) One thing to watch out for - noise gate - this will affect your tone and will cancel out the decay if you set it too high. A gate cuts noise by shutting down the signal for quieter sounds, which unfortunately includes decaying notes.


(a) Not necessarily. There are cures for most tone-suckage problems. Some cures are pretty easy (putting a buffer in front of half-assed bypas pedals, or even if you have too many true bypass pedals that will pretty much solve the problem), some are more of a faff (true bypass loops for crappy buffers) and only really worth it if you love the pedal and it's not available in any other format which doesn't suck tone.

(b) Again, not necessarily. There are plenty of crappy cheap pedals, granted, but there are also plenty of good ones. There are also plenty of crappy expensive pedals, or ones which are clones or glorified clones of cheaper pedals. Granted, there are also plenty of good expensive pedals.

(c) Yep good idea.

(d) Also a good idea.

What's the custom noise gate, out of interest?
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Jan 4, 2016,
#5
Cheap noise gates suck tone. Yank it and re-test.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#6
Quote by Dave_Mc


What's the custom noise gate, out of interest?


It only removes custom noise...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#7
Quote by Arby911
It only removes custom noise...


It's a pedal that is made locally, handwired. maybe boutique was a better word to describe it. also, cables have huge impact on tone ? expensive cables are worth it ?
#8
Quote by STEGMAIER
It's a pedal that is made locally, handwired. maybe boutique was a better word to describe it. also, cables have huge impact on tone ? expensive cables are worth it ?


Negative on the cables as long as they are decent GC quality. Surgically remove the noise gate and re-test. They are nearly always a tone and sustain suck.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#9
Quote by Arby911
It only removes custom noise...


lol

Quote by STEGMAIER
It's a pedal that is made locally, handwired. maybe boutique was a better word to describe it. also, cables have huge impact on tone ? expensive cables are worth it ?


it depends. if you're plugging straight in to the amp, yeah they can affect tone (but it's normally not worth paying crazy money either, once you hit the decent-value-pro-quality stuff diminishing returns set in pretty quickly). capacitance is the thing to look at, higher capacitance will suck more treble per unit of length.

if you have a buffer in your chain (or a buffered pedal) anything downwind of the buffer (i.e. between the buffer and your amp) should be cured by the buffer, assuming the buffer is half-decent at all.

if it's a boutique noisegate it may well be fine- it may be a clone of something good (e.g. decimator). assuming it's made well.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#10
OK so you're using a Overdrive and a EQ. If I'm right deciphering the name as an overdrive...not enough there to warrant a noise gate. If you had 8 pedals, a noise gate might be a good idea. I run 4 effects plus volume pedal, and the only noise I get is a slight hum from running dual amps, (ground problem) and a little buzz when I punch up the distortion pedal. That happens if I run it by itself, not many distortion pedals don't get a little noise.

Try just the amp by itself, set it for the basic tone you want. Unless the amp really sucks, I'd put noise gate and EQ in a closet and run just overdrive. I just pulled out my EQ for a Fender Pro Jr, not near enough lows from that amp. Until then it hadn't been out of a box in 10 years. The only time I find an EQ handy is for something like the really high treble sound Eric Johnson uses a lot or the bass issue with the Pro Jr... Unless you're trying to get a totally different sound, the amp should do a good job of EQ.

Yeah I know, so what about the Pro Jr...I've been standing in front of a Fender Super Reverb for almost 15 years and a Peavey MX with Kustom 2x12 cabinet for 15 years before that, both sound like a 10 foot bulldog barking if I hit a low A, I'm spoiled. The Pro Jr sounds thin and wimpy onstage with the Super Reverb, it needs help from the EQ a lot. One 10" speaker vs 4 of them is no contest...the big amp moves a whole lot more air, lots more bass. First time I plugged in with both I gave up on the Pro Jr in no time, sounded like a toy amp. So I added the EQ for that. Your amp shouldn't need one unless you're after a totally different sound when it's on. 90% of the time I'm running just the Super Reverb with only the delay turned on.

If All you're running is those 2 boxes, you shouldn't need a noise gate. I don't use one with 4 pedals and 2 amps. Including when I add a wireless unit in front. My first pedal is a Arion Analog Delay, that one acts as a pretty good buffer, I use a volume pedal, and when I turn it full volume onstage I get almost no noise at all with everything off and only one amp. (I also use it by running 2 cables out of the A/B switch sometimes, one to each channel of the Super Reverb) With everything on, yes it's a bit noisy, but I rarely have more than one pedal active at a time. I also power everything with one wall wart that has enough amperage to power them all at once with some to spare, still only very slight hum even at loud stage volume.

With just a couple of pedals, you shouldn't be having serious noise problems, not enough to require a noise gate.

I don't think cables make much difference at all. I'm using a Whirlwind I bought new in 1990, still works perfect, the other cables are all generic ones I've picked up and some cases replaced jacks, I hear no difference at all when I play at home with just an amp. any one cables sounds no different than any other. The only time I trace noise back to cables is when one develops a bad connection or direct short and starts to buzz. All my patch cables between pedals are home built from old guitar cables. A couple have been stepped on one time too many and developed bad spots in the middle, they get re used as short patch cables. As long as I do a good soldering job, I notice no real difference, cheap cables, good ones, old well used ones, rebuilt into foot long patch cables...

Start with just the amp, dial in your sound. Then add the overdrive and you should be good to go.

I highly recommend getting a volume pedal and using it, you can adjust volume on the fly without stopping to grab a knob, and you still get full pickup output when playing at lower rhythm volume levels, which means no treble loss. The volume knob on the guitar reduces pickup output, first thing that does is cut some treble. Using a volume pedal you keep full pickup output, no treble loss, you get much better volume control, and don't have to stop playing to fiddle with the knobs. I've been using one for 30 years, can't live without it these days.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#11
what are the cables? if its those multi coloured eBay ones then it's them.
mojostompboxes.com
#12
Quote by greeny23
what are the cables? if its those multi coloured eBay ones then it's them.


yes, it's those multi-colored eBay ones, and the long ones are generic pieces of shit, that make weird noises when hit. i'm gonna try replacing them.
#13
Quote by Paleo Pete
OK so you're using a Overdrive and a EQ. If I'm right deciphering the name as an overdrive...not enough there to warrant a noise gate. If you had 8 pedals, a noise gate might be a good idea. I run 4 effects plus volume pedal, and the only noise I get is a slight hum from running dual amps, (ground problem) and a little buzz when I punch up the distortion pedal. That happens if I run it by itself, not many distortion pedals don't get a little noise.

Try just the amp by itself, set it for the basic tone you want. Unless the amp really sucks, I'd put noise gate and EQ in a closet and run just overdrive. I just pulled out my EQ for a Fender Pro Jr, not near enough lows from that amp. Until then it hadn't been out of a box in 10 years. The only time I find an EQ handy is for something like the really high treble sound Eric Johnson uses a lot or the bass issue with the Pro Jr... Unless you're trying to get a totally different sound, the amp should do a good job of EQ.

Yeah I know, so what about the Pro Jr...I've been standing in front of a Fender Super Reverb for almost 15 years and a Peavey MX with Kustom 2x12 cabinet for 15 years before that, both sound like a 10 foot bulldog barking if I hit a low A, I'm spoiled. The Pro Jr sounds thin and wimpy onstage with the Super Reverb, it needs help from the EQ a lot. One 10" speaker vs 4 of them is no contest...the big amp moves a whole lot more air, lots more bass. First time I plugged in with both I gave up on the Pro Jr in no time, sounded like a toy amp. So I added the EQ for that. Your amp shouldn't need one unless you're after a totally different sound when it's on. 90% of the time I'm running just the Super Reverb with only the delay turned on.

If All you're running is those 2 boxes, you shouldn't need a noise gate. I don't use one with 4 pedals and 2 amps. Including when I add a wireless unit in front. My first pedal is a Arion Analog Delay, that one acts as a pretty good buffer, I use a volume pedal, and when I turn it full volume onstage I get almost no noise at all with everything off and only one amp. (I also use it by running 2 cables out of the A/B switch sometimes, one to each channel of the Super Reverb) With everything on, yes it's a bit noisy, but I rarely have more than one pedal active at a time. I also power everything with one wall wart that has enough amperage to power them all at once with some to spare, still only very slight hum even at loud stage volume.

With just a couple of pedals, you shouldn't be having serious noise problems, not enough to require a noise gate.

I don't think cables make much difference at all. I'm using a Whirlwind I bought new in 1990, still works perfect, the other cables are all generic ones I've picked up and some cases replaced jacks, I hear no difference at all when I play at home with just an amp. any one cables sounds no different than any other. The only time I trace noise back to cables is when one develops a bad connection or direct short and starts to buzz. All my patch cables between pedals are home built from old guitar cables. A couple have been stepped on one time too many and developed bad spots in the middle, they get re used as short patch cables. As long as I do a good soldering job, I notice no real difference, cheap cables, good ones, old well used ones, rebuilt into foot long patch cables...

Start with just the amp, dial in your sound. Then add the overdrive and you should be good to go.

I highly recommend getting a volume pedal and using it, you can adjust volume on the fly without stopping to grab a knob, and you still get full pickup output when playing at lower rhythm volume levels, which means no treble loss. The volume knob on the guitar reduces pickup output, first thing that does is cut some treble. Using a volume pedal you keep full pickup output, no treble loss, you get much better volume control, and don't have to stop playing to fiddle with the knobs. I've been using one for 30 years, can't live without it these days.


the noise gate if for when I cranck the distortion, the amp doesn't feedback like crazy
#14
the noise gate if for when I cranck the distortion, the amp doesn't feedback like crazy


I don't know how many times I've played my Super Reverb cranked to 10 and the distortion pedal never got feedback. Even my hollowbody Cort rarely gets feedback, and then I have to try for it.

If you're getting crazy feedback from a distortion pedal either you have a microphonic pickup or you have the distortion set too high. I've seen loads of amateur guitar players onstage with distortion pedals and every kind of amp made, rarely any feedback unless they want it. I can stand a foot from my Super Reverb cranked to 10, distortion pedal on, and can't get any feedback from my Strat. I've done it lots of times trying to get some feedback...that may be my amp, it's the only complaint I've ever had, I should be able to get intentional feedback even without any pedals. That said though, dozens of guitar players onstage with Fender, Marshall, Peavey amps and more, and feedback only when they want it. Hendrix was said to look for the positions onstage where he could get feedback and mark them with tape.

The only time I get out of control feedback is when I push the gain too high. Onstage you don't need anywhere near the gain and saturation that sounds great in the bedroom for practice. I keep the gain on my pedal down around the 9 o'clock position and it works great. That's not a lot of gain...years ago (before I knew better) I used it at the 2 o'clock position. Always wondered why my sound was muddy...then a better guitar player told me to turn the gain down. My overdrive only gets any distortion at all if I almost max out the gain, I keep it just barely below that level, for a mostly clean boost.

If you're getting unwanted feedback, pedal or not, there's a different problem. Otherwise distortion pedals wouldn't be so popular. I'd check for a microphonic pickup. If you crank the amp and stand close, with nothing but a guitar cable, does it still feedback like crazy? None of my amps will feedback cranked to 10 if I stand a foot away. The one time I did get that it was a microphonic pickup, so I potted it. that means dipping it in canning wax, letting it cool and cleaning things up. the out of control feedback stopped then and there. But it did it pedal or not at loud stage volume. I generally ran the Super Reverb cranked to 10 onstage, loud band.

Now that I know that, I'm not sure you don't have a different problem. If you do have really cheap cables, it's certainly worth getting decent ones, but I've never seen a huge difference in high end expensive cables. I avoid the cheap, skinny, shiny ones with molded jacks, usually if they have jacks with screw on caps, you should be ok. I just go for the middle of the road cables, they've done me a good job for 40 years.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
Last edited by Paleo Pete at Jan 6, 2016,
#15
to be fair, he's using a high gain amp and a super reverb isn't a high gain amp. you're advising him based on your kit which is very different from his. you can often benefit from a noise gate if you're using a high gain amp even if you're using no pedals, if the gain on the amp is set pretty high.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#16
Try this order in your effects chain:
Guitar> joyo EQ > blackstar LT drive > custom noise gate > blackstar HT1RH + HT408 cab
See if this does the job as your gain stages with the EQ and overdrive are being cut off with the noise gate being in front of them, which defeats the purpose of the noise gate. The added gain from either the EQ when you boost certain frequencies combined with the added gain stage of the LT Drive is precisely use the noise gate at the end of the chain.
#17
Quote by Dave_Mc
lol


it depends. if you're plugging straight in to the amp, yeah they can affect tone (but it's normally not worth paying crazy money either, once you hit the decent-value-pro-quality stuff diminishing returns set in pretty quickly). capacitance is the thing to look at, higher capacitance will suck more treble per unit of length.

if you have a buffer in your chain (or a buffered pedal) anything downwind of the buffer (i.e. between the buffer and your amp) should be cured by the buffer, assuming the buffer is half-decent at all.

if it's a boutique noisegate it may well be fine- it may be a clone of something good (e.g. decimator). assuming it's made well.


Cloning a decimator is no walk in the park.
Do a search for it on DIYSB, most of them say "Just Go Buy One".
Similar results will turn up on FSB too. And those guys would reverse engineer the Space Shuttle if someone would deliver it.
Others are a bit easier, but it shows in the quality.
Building or cloning a GOOD, HIGH QUALITY noisegate isn't like building or cloning any other kind of pedal.
I can build a noisegate with something like 10 - 15 parts, but it won't be high quality.
I built one into a fuzz pedal once for Shits 'N Grins, it did its job, but also killed the sustain.

Setting a noise gate properly can be a delicate balance between to much and to little.
The Decimetor G-String was a walk in the park though.
One knob.

Tap on your cables with your pick
If you get noise when you tap on your cables, your cables are shit.
Might as well use a couple of those metal coat hangers.

#1: Plug straight into amp
#2: Test
#3: Add a Pedal
#4: Test
#5: Remove Pedal
#6: Try (*or add) another pedal.
#7: Do this until you have gone through all your pedals.

*If you get no noise, do it again but skip step #5.
When you go this route, when you get noise, leave the pedal in that "started" the noise.
Leave that pedal in and start removing the other pedals, one at a time.
This could help you determine if the issue is just 2 pedals that don't play nicely together.

Then repeat all of the above again, but this time with battery power.
(If you even have to go that far)
Then go buy me a pizza, I'm hungry.

Yes, doing all that testing is very much overkill.
I've never had to go that far myself. And you probably won't have to either.

And "boutique" doesn't always mean better.
It usually means "More Expensive" but not necessarily better.
Last edited by CodeMonk at Jan 7, 2016,
#18
A rackmount ISP Decimator Pro Rack G gets my pocket nice and slippery. Mostly because I intend to run a multi-amp setup.

Until them, so what my amp makes a little hum. I deal. You can deal. I will hit something shortly, I promise.

If it's beyond that, you sir need to practice your muting.
"If you're looking for me,
you better check under the sea,
because that's where you'll find me..."
Last edited by DeathByDestroyr at Jan 7, 2016,
#19
Quote by CodeMonk
Cloning a decimator is no walk in the park.
Do a search for it on DIYSB, most of them say "Just Go Buy One".
Similar results will turn up on FSB too. And those guys would reverse engineer the Space Shuttle if someone would deliver it.
Others are a bit easier, but it shows in the quality.
Building or cloning a GOOD, HIGH QUALITY noisegate isn't like building or cloning any other kind of pedal.
I can build a noisegate with something like 10 - 15 parts, but it won't be high quality.
I built one into a fuzz pedal once for Shits 'N Grins, it did its job, but also killed the sustain.

Setting a noise gate properly can be a delicate balance between to much and to little.
The Decimetor G-String was a walk in the park though.
One knob.

Tap on your cables with your pick
If you get noise when you tap on your cables, your cables are shit.
Might as well use a couple of those metal coat hangers.

#1: Plug straight into amp
#2: Test
#3: Add a Pedal
#4: Test
#5: Remove Pedal
#6: Try (*or add) another pedal.
#7: Do this until you have gone through all your pedals.

*If you get no noise, do it again but skip step #5.
When you go this route, when you get noise, leave the pedal in that "started" the noise.
Leave that pedal in and start removing the other pedals, one at a time.
This could help you determine if the issue is just 2 pedals that don't play nicely together.

Then repeat all of the above again, but this time with battery power.
(If you even have to go that far)
Then go buy me a pizza, I'm hungry.

Yes, doing all that testing is very much overkill.
I've never had to go that far myself. And you probably won't have to either.

And "boutique" doesn't always mean better.
It usually means "More Expensive" but not necessarily better.


hey, my cables doesn't make noise when plugged to the amp AND the guitar, but all of them make audible noise when connected to the amp only, does that mean all my cables are shit ?
#20
Quote by STEGMAIER
hey, my cables doesn't make noise when plugged to the amp AND the guitar, but all of them make audible noise when connected to the amp only, does that mean all my cables are shit ?


No, that's normal. If the cable is plugged into the amp on one end and the other end isn't plugged into anything you'll get some humming and if anything touches the very tip it will make a loud noise. That's just how guitar cables work.
#21
Quote by The4thHorsemen
No, that's normal. If the cable is plugged into the amp on one end and the other end isn't plugged into anything you'll get some humming and if anything touches the very tip it will make a loud noise. That's just how guitar cables work.

If one end is connected to your amp, and the other to nothing, yeah, it will make noise if you touch the tip.
I was talking about tapping the cord itself when one end is plugged into an amp (doesn't matter if the other end is plugged in or not), I'm talking about tapping the sheath, the outside of the cable, and it makes a sound, that's not good.

Tap whats in the green circle and you get noise, that's normal.
Tap whats in the red circle and you get noise (Kind of like a clicking sound), that's bad.
Doesn't matter if the other end is plugged in or not.
Thats what I meant when I said:
Tap on your cables with your pick
If you get noise when you tap on your cables, your cables are shit.
Might as well use a couple of those metal coat hangers.

And yeah, plugged into the amp only, you will get a little hum.



The end is commonly referred to as a "Plug".
The part the "Plug" goes into is commonly referred to as a "Jack".
Last edited by CodeMonk at Jan 7, 2016,
#22
Quote by CodeMonk
Cloning a decimator is no walk in the park.
Do a search for it on DIYSB, most of them say "Just Go Buy One".
Similar results will turn up on FSB too. And those guys would reverse engineer the Space Shuttle if someone would deliver it.
Others are a bit easier, but it shows in the quality.
Building or cloning a GOOD, HIGH QUALITY noisegate isn't like building or cloning any other kind of pedal.
I can build a noisegate with something like 10 - 15 parts, but it won't be high quality.
I built one into a fuzz pedal once for Shits 'N Grins, it did its job, but also killed the sustain.

Setting a noise gate properly can be a delicate balance between to much and to little.
The Decimetor G-String was a walk in the park though.
One knob.

Tap on your cables with your pick
If you get noise when you tap on your cables, your cables are shit.
Might as well use a couple of those metal coat hangers.

#1: Plug straight into amp
#2: Test
#3: Add a Pedal
#4: Test
#5: Remove Pedal
#6: Try (*or add) another pedal.
#7: Do this until you have gone through all your pedals.

*If you get no noise, do it again but skip step #5.
When you go this route, when you get noise, leave the pedal in that "started" the noise.
Leave that pedal in and start removing the other pedals, one at a time.
This could help you determine if the issue is just 2 pedals that don't play nicely together.

Then repeat all of the above again, but this time with battery power.
(If you even have to go that far)
Then go buy me a pizza, I'm hungry.

Yes, doing all that testing is very much overkill.
I've never had to go that far myself. And you probably won't have to either.

And "boutique" doesn't always mean better.
It usually means "More Expensive" but not necessarily better.


yeah, i figured it'd be difficult Just I remembered one of the DIY enthusiasts saying he'd built a clone of the decimator (but he may well have said it was really hard and i forgot that )
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#23
Quote by The4thHorsemen
No, that's normal. If the cable is plugged into the amp on one end and the other end isn't plugged into anything you'll get some humming and if anything touches the very tip it will make a loud noise. That's just how guitar cables work.


sorry, i meant if i tap them. if i tap them and they are connected, no noise,

if they are connected to the amp only, (no guitar), you can hear a noise going through the amp of taped with a tremolo arm
#24
Quote by CodeMonk
If one end is connected to your amp, and the other to nothing, yeah, it will make noise if you touch the tip.
I was talking about tapping the cord itself when one end is plugged into an amp (doesn't matter if the other end is plugged in or not), I'm talking about tapping the sheath, the outside of the cable, and it makes a sound, that's not good.

Tap whats in the green circle and you get noise, that's normal.
Tap whats in the red circle and you get noise (Kind of like a clicking sound), that's bad.
Doesn't matter if the other end is plugged in or not.
Thats what I meant when I said:

And yeah, plugged into the amp only, you will get a little hum.



The end is commonly referred to as a "Plug".
The part the "Plug" goes into is commonly referred to as a "Jack".


that's exactly what i did
#25
Lose the gate.


Oh, wait... I already said that.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY