#1
So i have this nice TCS bass, a copy of a musicman stingray or something similar, and when i bought it (second-hand off a guy who does repairs)it had a nice low action that i loved, but there was one problem. Around the 15th fret and up to around the 20th or 21st fret, there is a huge amount of fret buzz, you cant even hear the note. And on some frets, it plays the same note 2 frets in a row. I always thought it was a problem with the truss rod, and i finally got around to removing the pickgaurd to access the truss rod. And i noticed that just under the neck join, someone had shoved a pick under the neck. I thought that was a bit odd, but didnt think it was serious. i messed around with the truss rod, and even with the saddles on the bridge, but even when the action is ridiculuosly high, he fret problems remain.

Its a bolt on neck and was wonderng if it would be the pick thats causing the problem, should i remove it? or is that a bad idea to mess with the neck?
thanks for any advice
#2
In your position I'd take it to a decent luthier, it could be something as simple as requiring a very small amount of inward bow but if you're not sure get a pro engineer to look at it.
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#3
The pick was probably put in as a shim. If you do not know how to do a setup or if you don't have the confidence, then I agree with John Swift - take it to a local luthier or guitar shop.

Buzz above the 12th fret is a sign that the truss rod needs adjusted (called neck relief), actually loosened, so that a small amount of bow is allowed. Each manufacturer has their own setup specifications (neck relief, string action/height, pickup height), most of which you can find on the internet with a quick search.
#4
Quote by smtp4me
The pick was probably put in as a shim. If you do not know how to do a setup or if you don't have the confidence, then I agree with John Swift - take it to a local luthier or guitar shop.

Buzz above the 12th fret is a sign that the truss rod needs adjusted (called neck relief), actually loosened, so that a small amount of bow is allowed. Each manufacturer has their own setup specifications (neck relief, string action/height, pickup height), most of which you can find on the internet with a quick search.


The pick may indeed be a "temporary" shim. You may want to have a good tech reset the neck for you.

Buzz about the 12th fret can also be an indication of a too-high nut or a neck that's not properly set. It's also possible that you have some non-level frets. All three of those conditions are generally best handled by a tech.
#5
Nothing beats a good setup for any bass. Hands down the best money you can spend on your bass
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#7
Quote by sprockett7
this might sound quite noobish of me, but what is a shim?!?!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shim_(spacer)

In this context, the shim is being used to angle the neck forwards or backwards so the neck geometry is correct relative to the bridge so that the guitar is playable.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jan 9, 2016,
#8
The pick is a shim raising the neck to the bridge, and hen tilting the nut down to allow the adjustment for low action. I used a business card on the bass I shimmed.

The neck will show need of adjustment should you look down it from the nut and see an absolute straight line. If so, give the rod 1/8 to 3/8 loosening turn and check it in a couple of hours.

Now to gauge frets, go to Lowe's or Home Depot and go to the Tools section. Look for a 6-8" Carpenter's Straight Edge/Ruler.

when laying the straight edge of such a Ruler cross wise against the frets you should be able to glide the Ruler from Nut to Joint and experience no stoppages, but only hear some slight clicks.

When the Ruler stops or sticks, then check the path of each side of each string to see how un level the fret is in relation of G-E.

The Fret may have popped a little and for that you need a short Oak Dowel Rod about 5/8" and a small short handled hammer (found one at Sears - I use a Brass Mallet with a 8" handle). This is called Fret Knocking in my book because you are to do this with a firm strike.

Get a wood file to file the end of the dowel rod as it indents from use so you do not mar the fret board between the frets.

You may find this guitar needs a little TLC on the adjustment and Fret seating
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#9
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shim_(spacer)

In this context, the shim is being used to angle the neck forwards or backwards so the neck geometry is correct relative to the bridge so that the guitar is playable.

Fender used to put a micro tilt facility.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn