#1
Hey there,

I started playing again recently and I hoped some of you guys could help me with finding good pieces to learn. I use fingerstyle and play modern stuff mostly.


Some of the things that I like are;

Most of Sungha Jung
Sad songs (not really specific but feel free to send me anything)
A few Bach pieces like https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yTi3OmYUwXU

"Trippy/weird" and eerie songs that make you sink into your couch, my roommates really enjoy these when we're high but I mostly come up with these myself since I can't really find any.
Last edited by TBR1450 at Jan 6, 2016,
#2
You'd probably like Leo Kottkes version of Jesu, Joy Of Man's Desiring. Most of his other stuff is played really fast and doesn't have that eerie kinda vibe. John Fahey has a lot of cool atmospheric songs (The Red Pony, On The Sunny Side Of The Ocean, for exanple), but I'm not sure if he's what you're looking for
#3
The Prelude in D minor Bach is eerie and amazing and very accessible - have fun with the stretches! The A Minor Fugue from Bach (BMV 1000) is very advanced and has trippy counterpoint. Bouree from Bach is also kind of trippy - major counterpoint going on there.

"Dragon Won't Sleep" from Don Ross is definitely a cool weird tune and it's very accessible - it's unusual. Try "Zarzuela" if you wan't more of a challenge. Don Ross' first two albums are amazing and have lots of good tunes " Don Ross" and "Bearing it Straight" albums are fingerstyle goldmines and have plenty of different styles.

"La Catedral" from Barrios is amazing on Classical - see Ana Vidovic's you tube video of it - it's fierce! It may be well above your skill level, but it's worth a shot.
#5
You can take almost any song, and play it either really basic, or really advanced. I'm not sure it would really take you much longer to create your own arrangements like sung-ha does, than to learn a piece he plays. You can also choose the difficulty level if you arrange it yourself, and how workable it is into your freestyle vocabulary.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Jan 6, 2016,
#6
^^^^^I think that copying someone else's song is much harder than creating your own arrangements - provided you are sufficiently creative. Not I. I see learning someone else's arrangements as an exercise in raising my abilities at least as much as any pleasure I might get from playing it.
#8
Quote by Tony Done
^^^^^I think that copying someone else's song is much harder than creating your own arrangements - provided you are sufficiently creative. Not I. I see learning someone else's arrangements as an exercise in raising my abilities at least as much as any pleasure I might get from playing it.


Ya, I guess that can depend on a lot of factors. How strict you are to adhering to the melody, how good your ears are, and whose arrangement you're learning. Different people do have different outlooks though, which can definitely be cool.

For me though, I like to keep my grips relatively basic, so that I can wield them on demand. I like to have them accessible for freestyle, so arranging for myself does have that advantage. But also, if I learn a tommy piece, there's a lot to learn there. Some of it is a little beyond for some techniques also, so that would take me a while.

When I arrange for myself, it's also usually an exercise which is difficult, because playing the melody correctly with the chords, inevitably leads to some difficult fingering on guitar.

I guess it depends also on what exactly you're trying to learn, or what your destination is. As always, right?

But sometimes it can be hard to find the right level that's just beyond you, and if you arrange stuff yourself, you can choose the difficulty level. I could play a lot of songs that beginner's could learn, at a difficulty level way beyond their abilities. But what you don't really want to do is arrange stuff in such a way that's already easy for you to play it, if your aim is growth.

I've written songs that took me years to learn how to play properly.
#9
Quote by fingrpikingood
Ya, I guess that can depend on a lot of factors. How strict you are to adhering to the melody, how good your ears are, and whose arrangement you're learning. Different people do have different outlooks though, which can definitely be cool.

For me though, I like to keep my grips relatively basic, so that I can wield them on demand. I like to have them accessible for freestyle, so arranging for myself does have that advantage. But also, if I learn a tommy piece, there's a lot to learn there. Some of it is a little beyond for some techniques also, so that would take me a while.


I guess it depends also on what exactly you're trying to learn, or what your destination is. As always, right?



I'm not very creative, so I try to make do close copies of other player's styles so that I can use them in my own arrangements. - Not because I want to play exact copies of their songs, you can say I'm learning technique more than songs.

The way Bert Jansch plays, for example, is tricky for me, and not just the tunings, more his sense of timing and emphasis. I've also been listening to Tony Rice, and trying to get some of his flatpicking feel into my fingerpicking.
#10
Quote by Tony Done
I'm not very creative, so I try to make do close copies of other player's styles so that I can use them in my own arrangements. - Not because I want to play exact copies of their songs, you can say I'm learning technique more than songs.

The way Bert Jansch plays, for example, is tricky for me, and not just the tunings, more his sense of timing and emphasis. I've also been listening to Tony Rice, and trying to get some of his flatpicking feel into my fingerpicking.


I see what you mean. I think anyone of every level of creativity can pickup a few things that way. I try to stay away from alternate tunings, because it's another new fretboard to learn. For playing set pieces, it's not so bad, but for improvisation, it's too much for me. I'm also too lazy to keep retuning my guitar.

You can also pickup some stuff like that from converting pop songs though also, I find. It's still a close copy, but in order to do it, in the conversion, you have to make it work, which can be tough, and then you sort of developed your own thing, simply by attempting an exact copy.

I like to do that with songs, and then also add the freestyle aspect, which basically means being able to play the harmony and melody in multiple locations of the neck. You have to make concessions though sometimes, because some things are just too difficult or impossible to play.

But there are "guitar things" that different players develop that you can learn from. Little things that are specifically guitar friendly. I've definitely done some of that also.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Jan 6, 2016,
#11
Hey, a bit late but if you like trippy stuff on classical guitar, there is:

Danza Caracteristica by Leo Brouwer:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w7Ji8Tc0lmQ

This is a full band version:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5FrqelTCG7M

It's easier to learn than it sounds and it sounds super cool to me

By the same author (Leo Brouwer), all the "Estudios Sencillios" are great too.

Last edited by Tchekitchek at Jan 22, 2016,