#1
Hi!

I've been playing guitar for almost 4 years. Mostly black metal stuff - no solos, just tremolo picking. I decided to expand my skills. I started to learn this solo, and as you can guess I failed miserably. I thought that if I will practice it over and over again, I will eventually build up the speed. Unfortunately I was wrong. Without any experience in playing such complicated and fast solos, I can only dream about playing this one.

I'm looking for a set of exercises which would allow me to gradually build up the speed, learn sweep picking etc. I think that having a list of GP files with names like "Level 1", "Level 2" etc. would be the best option for me. If I would have such set of files, I would be able to learn each level every few days. It would be highly motivating for me (learning each level in a certain amount of time).
Do you know where can I find something like this?
#2
Quote by tomaszikaspercz
I think that having a list of GP files with names like "Level 1", "Level 2" etc. would be the best option for me.


I really don't think so. There's no "level" in shredding. It's not like "I'm going to practice this exercise for a couple of days to gain enough experience for shredding level 2". If I were you, I'd start looking into some simpler guitar solos and start with that, and gradually work towards more difficult ones. In a few years, you could probably pull that solo off.

If I would have such set of files, I would be able to learn each level every few days. It would be highly motivating for me (learning each level in a certain amount of time).
Do you know where can I find something like this?


I don't like the mentality that you can't become a talented musician without 6 hours of practice a day for 12 years, tbh you can become a great guitarist for much less effort, but "a few days" is a bit unrealistic. As I said, I'd probably pick an easy solo, practice that for a few weeks until I could really play it clean and accurate. Then start working on some other solo.

If you want to learn sweeping, find a couple of guitar solos with sweeping and practice those. If you want to learn alternate picking, find a couple of guitar solos with alt picking and practice those. No reason to drill empty exercises when you can practice with real music.
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#3
Quote by tomaszikaspercz

I'm looking for a set of exercises which would allow me to gradually build up the speed, learn sweep picking etc. I think that having a list of GP files with names like "Level 1", "Level 2" etc. would be the best option for me. If I would have such set of files, I would be able to learn each level every few days. It would be highly motivating for me (learning each level in a certain amount of time).
Do you know where can I find something like this?


back in the day those "sets of files" were called "instructional videos". first on vhs, then dvd. the internet is full of sets of files you just need to browse.

here's one:
http://www.alfred.com/Browse/Instruments/GuitarBassEtc/Guitar.aspx

you tube also has a lot of help too.

but if measured achievement is what you want though, i think a teacher might be the best.

good luck,
Last edited by ad_works at Jan 6, 2016,
#4
Thank you for your opinions guys. I really appreciate it. Well, maybe my way of approaching this problem is wrong. I think I'm gonna make a list of guitar solos and learn to play them, staring from the easiest one, finishing on the Death and The Healing solo, just like Kevätuhri suggested.
Unfortunately attending a guitar course is not an option for me (weird work schedule). But I will check out the link proposed by ad_works. Thanks again.
Last edited by tomaszikaspercz at Jan 6, 2016,
#5
If you really want to learn sweeps, the easiest ones I can think of is Kirk's in Leper Messiah and a few of Marty Friedman's in Hangar 18, specifically the first solo.
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#6
Quote by Kevätuhri
I really don't think so. There's no "level" in shredding. It's not like "I'm going to practice this exercise for a couple of days to gain enough experience for shredding level 2". If I were you, I'd start looking into some simpler guitar solos and start with that, and gradually work towards more difficult ones. In a few years, you could probably pull that solo off.


I don't like the mentality that you can't become a talented musician without 6 hours of practice a day for 12 years, tbh you can become a great guitarist for much less effort, but "a few days" is a bit unrealistic. As I said, I'd probably pick an easy solo, practice that for a few weeks until I could really play it clean and accurate. Then start working on some other solo.

If you want to learn sweeping, find a couple of guitar solos with sweeping and practice those. If you want to learn alternate picking, find a couple of guitar solos with alt picking and practice those. No reason to drill empty exercises when you can practice with real music.


What you're saying makes sense, but doesn't it also make sense to have a bunch of warmup exercises for help?

Practice is important too, and playing songs doesn't count as practice, not alone anyway.
#7
Quote by josonmj
What you're saying makes sense, but doesn't it also make sense to have a bunch of warmup exercises for help?

Practice is important too, and playing songs doesn't count as practice, not alone anyway.


I agree and disagree with you.

Warmups are good, and I didn't mean that all exercises are inherently bad or something. Just that you shouldn't learn how to shred via exercises and random licks only. If you want to learn how to play music, you need to practice music.

And playing songs isn't practice, true. But practicing songs is. I'm not saying TS should just keep playing transilvanian hunger and magically his skills improve daily. But playing and learning songs you're unfamiliar with is the best form of practice.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#8
1) start with slow and accessible metal solos - Iron Maiden Powerslave album for example ( Aces High, Powerslave, Rhyme of the Ancient Mariner all have great solos) or Black Sabbath Paranoid Album - they will have some faster parts here and there, but they will be much more manageable than most modern metal. Ride the Lightning and Master of Puppets albums from Metallica have very accessible solos as well.

2) exercises - check out John Pettrucci's Rock Discipline video - it has all the exercises you'll ever need. Practice these in addition to working on some slower solos at the start.

Only practicing exercises is a terrible approach, exercises are there to supplement the musical material you will be learning - you need to work your way up in difficulty when it comes to lead playing - it's a fool's errand to focus on overly technical things to start.