#1
hi all,

My question is: After i had made a rough mix, how do i make the mix louder?

I have novice experience in recording, mixing and mastering. I don't really know how to make my mix any louder / to a professional standard. I use cubase. I "record" as loud as possible and then fade everything into place, pan, do some EQ. -

But I dont know how to make the mix louder at all? - If I slam a multiband compressor on the master it destroys the entire mix pumping the bass, and scooping the whole track.

I tried using group tracks and using different compressors on each group, that was just as bad.

Cheers.
#2
you don't make it louder in the mix.

Put gain controls on your channels and turn them down about -12db. That gives you lots of head room to mix properly and get a nice balanced sound with no clipping. When you are happy with the mix, mix it down to stereo then reload it into a new session on one track then master. you make it louder using compression and EQ when mastering.

Check you tube for basic mastering within a daw. Or try watching a few Recording Revolution vids on youtube. Very useful even if all the songs are about god and stuff.
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Last edited by crackerjack123 at Jan 7, 2016,
#3
Crackerjack is right. It's not about getting your mix loud it's about getting your final two track stereo mix louder after the mix is completed by doing some basic mastering. If you are trying to get your mix loud you most likely will not leave room to master the final mix because there is no room for using additional EQ, compression or limiters on the mix. Just get the best mix you can. Like Crackerjack said take your 2 track mix and import it back into your software where you can then use overall EQ (sparingly) for overall tone, compression for overall balance and (if you have access) a Brick Wall Limiter to keep an eye on the peaks and insure maximum volume. Don't feel bad, the mastering process is still a mystery to many home studio recordings. It is this final step that is way too often overlooked and not understood.

I went to an all day seminar a few years ago in New York City that was all about mastering and I was amazed by how much there is to this process and how much I didn't know. A day long seminar just got me some of the basic concepts. I bought T-Racks Mastering Suite software (recommended by the engineer at the seminar) and it is great but there is a lot you can do to get decent results using the method Crackerjack outlined using what you already have. Good luck.

Check out Bobby Owsinski's mastering videos on YouTube. Owsinski also has a few good books on mastering and mixing and his site has some videos that are helpful.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at Jan 7, 2016,
#5
A limiter. You can also use a clipper but a limiter is basically a compressor designed for loudness and should always be the final thing in your mastering chain. EQ, compression, saturation, stereo enhancers, exciters - these are all optional and depend on the mix. It is very possible you mix something so well that all you need is a very small amount of overall compression to 'glue' the mix, and then a clipper and a limiter to maximise loudness. Just don't go overboard with a limiter a crush your mix. Use your ears. (Death Magnetic anyone? )

As others have said, headroom is important in mixing so don't try to push the faders as far as they'll go (or even clip). Aim for around -6db on the mixbuss. This will give you room to work with when mastering. I agree with Rickholly about T-Racks being very good, I like their brickwall limiter and classic clipper, but there's plenty of stuff out there to try
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Last edited by edgespear at Jan 7, 2016,
#6
Year old post I know...but the bad is never do as he said he did. " I "record" as loud as possible" leave yourself head room on your recorded tracks for the mix. Then mastering will do its MAGIC!
Last edited by roxy69 at Jan 7, 2016,
#7
Quote by 094568029434geo
hi all,

My question is: After i had made a rough mix, how do i make the mix louder?

I have novice experience in recording, mixing and mastering. I don't really know how to make my mix any louder / to a professional standard. I use cubase. I "record" as loud as possible and then fade everything into place, pan, do some EQ. -

But I dont know how to make the mix louder at all? - If I slam a multiband compressor on the master it destroys the entire mix pumping the bass, and scooping the whole track.

I tried using group tracks and using different compressors on each group, that was just as bad.

Cheers.


EQ !!!!

The first step to get loudness without clipping is EQ - High Pass filters, reducing the lows/low mids and SLIGHTLY raising some of the higher frequencies will increase perceived loudness and allow you to crank the level more without clipping it. Often the bass and low mid frequencies are the ones overloading the signal without you noticing it. These should be checked on all your individual tracks.

Also - watch out to make sure you aren't getting too much of your actual volume from reverb and other effects - because those will bog down overall clarity and perceived volume. Watch out for too much low end on reverbs - use a reverb with an eq built ( like Waves H-reverb) in or eq your reverb aux track to cut some lows.

It really helps to use a reference mix ( such as an mp3 from a professional album) to compare with so that you adjust your EQ balance somewhat accordingly. Most commercial releases are simply insanely bright, which cuts through on the radio like a knife, but may not work on your material.

I'll leave it to others here to discuss compression, which is the other useful tool. But in my experience, the main issue with perceived loudness starts with EQ, compresssion is secondary.
Last edited by reverb66 at Jan 8, 2016,