#1
Edit: Thanks guys. After checking them out at Guitar Center, I've decided to go with the G400. Much better tone, and I prefer the feel.


I currently have a terrible strat knockoff, and i need to upgrade. with a $300-400 budget, i am looking at the Epiphone G400 Pro and the Jackson JS32Q DKA. Does anybody have any past experience with these guitars or any advise for me?

I play Hard Rock (Rush, Boston, AC-DC, Black Sabbath), Glam (Def Leppard, Van Halen, Motley Crue), and Metal (Metallica, Megadeth, Iron Maiden).

Setup: Peavey Bandit 112 with a few Joyo Pedals

Skill: Amatuer

Guitar preferences:
Body: SG, Explorer, Flying V, and Strat
Neck: Don't mind much, but preferably thinner
Frets: 22 - 24, medium - jumbo
Pickups: Humbucker, coil tapping would be nice
Tremolo: would be nice, but not mandatory
Used or new, but preferably used
Last edited by wickershamdef at Jan 9, 2016,
#2
You're comparing apples to oranges. The G400 has a much thicker neck, a shorter scale length, smaller frets, a more curved fretboard, radically different ergonomics overall and very differently voiced pickups to the Jackson.

Do you want a fixed bridge or a Floyd?

Between the two, I'd get the G400 if anything but the fact that it has a fixed bridge rather than a cheap Floyd like the Jackson has. You get what you pay for with Floyds. The cheap ones often have tuning stability problems that are very frustrating to try and deal with. And with the diverse range of tunings those bands you mentioned use, makes owning a Floyd a royal ballache unless you can afford to own multiple guitars specifically set up for different tunings. It goes without saying that most novice players cannot afford to do this. So a fixed bridge is going to be way more practical for what you'll most likely be doing.

Although if it were me, I'd get a completely different guitar entirely from what you've mentioned. And at your budget, I'd seriously consider going used.

Please answer these questions in this link as specifically as you can.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1497696

All you've talked about is what bands you want to play like and your budget, but you've given no information about your personal preferences when it comes to the guitars themselves. We need to know more in order to help you.

If you cannot answer those questions or the only answers you can give are vague ones, then your problem is that you don't know what you want. In which case, go to a guitar store and play as many different guitars as possible to get a much better idea of what you actually want in terms of overall feel. Then consider buying something.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Jan 7, 2016,
#3
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
You're comparing apples to oranges. The G400 has a much thicker neck, a shorter scale length, smaller frets, a more curved fretboard, radically different ergonomics overall and very differently voiced pickups to the Jackson.

Do you want a fixed bridge or a Floyd?

Between the two, I'd get the G400 if anything but the fact that it has a fixed bridge rather than a cheap Floyd like the Jackson has. You get what you pay for with Floyds. The cheap ones often have tuning stability problems that are very frustrating to try and deal with. And with the diverse range of tunings those bands you mentioned use, makes owning a Floyd a royal ballache unless you can afford to own multiple guitars specifically set up for different tunings. It goes without saying that most novice players cannot afford to do this. So a fixed bridge is going to be way more practical for what you'll most likely be doing.

Although if it were me, I'd get a completely different guitar entirely from what you've mentioned. And at your budget, I'd seriously consider going used.

Please answer these questions in this link as specifically as you can.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1497696

All you've talked about is what bands you want to play like and your budget, but you've given no information about your personal preferences when it comes to the guitars themselves. We need to know more in order to help you.

If you cannot answer those questions or the only answers you can give are vague ones, then your problem is that you don't know what you want. In which case, go to a guitar store and play as many different guitars as possible to get a much better idea of what you actually want in terms of overall feel. Then consider buying something.

Thanks. I'm most likely going with a used, and I did not realize that about the Floyd Rose. I am going to a store soon to check them both out, but I'll most likely go with the G400 if the Jackson has tuning problems.

Updated post with preferences
#4
I've managed to handle both while playing around at Guitar Center. The Jackson seems to be a slightly nicer version of the JS22 (not a bad number for the price range) as far as the neck goes, which doesn't have the Floyd Rose. The neck is lower-end, but feels pretty nice. The G400 just had very nice neck, and while not a Strat (obviously), the overall quality seemed better than that JS32Q and without a FR.
Try them out, but if those are your options, G400, from my ignorant view.
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#5
These guitars are so different, I'm surprised you'd consider both of these. I don't see the SG all that suited for harder rock/metal. Jackson necks are thin, not sure about the SG.

In terms of the tremolo, I'd get some new original Floyd springs to replace whatever comes on the guitar. That should help.

For $400 you can get a used made in Japan Jackson DKMG, which is a solid upper mid-range guitar. Get that instead of these entry-level ones.
#6
Quote by wickershamdef
Thanks. I'm most likely going with a used, and I did not realize that about the Floyd Rose. I am going to a store soon to check them both out, but I'll most likely go with the G400 if the Jackson has tuning problems.

Updated post with preferences


'Tuning problems' is a bit too simplistic of a way to put it really. A good Floyd Rose unit (an Original, Schaller, Gotoh, etc) holds tuning rock steady, and cheaper ones tend to as well so long as they're in a good condition. But the cheap ones are made with cheaper, softer materials which wear faster, especially the knife edges. It's when those knife edges start to blunt that the guitar starts to develop some tuning instability because the bridge doesn't return to the exact same spot like it's supposed to.

The other tuning issue is that it's a pain in the neck to change to a different tuning. Because the bridge floats you have to balance the string tension against the tension of the springs in the back, so any time you want to play something in a different tuning you need to tune, then adjust the springs and repeat the whole process iteratively as many times as it takes to get the bridge level and the guitar in tune. Not something you'd want to do just to play that one song you like in DADFAD. It's alright if you've got several guitars, but if it's your only one (or the only one you like to play) then it'll be frustrating.

It's a combination of the two which mean that most folks would advise against a guitar with a cheap Floyd. However having said that, there are cheaper Floyds out there that hold their tuning quite well and could be described as 'solid but unspectacular' - they'll stay in tune but they won't be as responsive or nice to use as a good one would be. The JT580LP that Jackson used to put on the Pro series models was a 'solid but unspectacular' unit - but I don't know if they put the same one on the current JS range or not. Either way, you'd probably be frustrated by how difficult it is to change tuning.

Now since I'm a big Jackson fan I don't want to put you off from the brand at all. I've heard good things about the JS32 range from people who know their stuff, and they do plenty of models with hardtails which would be easier to live with.

Ultimately I'd say just see what the store has on display, play the ones you like the look of and form an opinion from there. At this price point quality control can be a bit hit and miss - so it's definitely best to try the actual guitar that you'll be getting. If you play a 'floor model' and they go to get one out of the back when you decided to buy it, make sure you check that one over as well.
#7
Quote by dthmtl3
These guitars are so different, I'm surprised you'd consider both of these. I don't see the SG all that suited for harder rock/metal.



Which is something I honestly find surprising because IMHO it looks evil (in a subtle way, not glaring B.C Rich style) as hell, way more metal than any bland super strat guitar. I mean just look at the damn horns! To my eyes its like a bit more devilish looking Les Paul and Les Paul is a classic heavy metal guitar. And despite all that it seems like Tony Iommi is the only metal guitarist in the world who likes SG's. I dont understand why this is the case. I fricking love SG...


...except for the plastic pickguard but I dont like it in any guitar.

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Last edited by MaaZeus at Jan 8, 2016,
#8
Quote by MaaZeus
Which is something I honestly find surprising because IMHO it looks evil (in a subtle way, not glaring B.C Rich style) as hell, way more metal than any bland super strat guitar. I mean just look at the damn horns! To my eyes its like a bit more devilish looking Les Paul and Les Paul is a classic heavy metal guitar. And despite all that it seems like Tony Iommi is the only metal guitarist in the world who likes SG's. I dont understand why this is the case. I fricking love SG...


...except for the plastic pickguard but I dont like it in any guitar.


It's a very inconsistent design-- horns but round curves, the LP details (labeled knobs and switch, headstock, ugly plastic tuners). I'll agree with you on the pickguard, that's doesn't look good on any guitar. And for the love of .... is that the output jack sticking out...of the front of the guitar? Who designs something like that and thinks it looks good? It's no accident that it's not a guitar you'll commonly see in metal.
#9
Quote by dthmtl3
It's a very inconsistent design-- horns but round curves, the LP details (labeled knobs and switch, headstock, ugly plastic tuners). I'll agree with you on the pickguard, that's doesn't look good on any guitar. And for the love of .... is that the output jack sticking out...of the front of the guitar? Who designs something like that and thinks it looks good? It's no accident that it's not a guitar you'll commonly see in metal.


I dont mind the round curves but thankfully ESP improved the design a bit further by getting rid of the pickguard and moving the jack into the bottom where it belongs.

I have not held the ESP's version in my hands yet but judging from the asymmetric shape they added and the new location for strap pin I believe it MAY also be a bit less suspectible to neck diving which SG is infamous for.

ESP LTD F-50 + Tonezone
Cort EVL-Z4 + X2N
Cort EVL-K47B

Marshall Valvestate 8100
Randall RG1503
Bugera 333
Peavey Rockmaster preamp

Line6 Pod X3