#1
Hey guys.
I am metalhead but I want to improve my chord work from basic major/minor chord progressions to something more advanced. Jazzy, bluesy chord works.
I want to know how to use maj9, maj7, dim etc. properly... Can you recommend something please?
Thank you.
Last edited by jozef2451 at Jan 8, 2016,
#2
(I play metal, but have played a lot of JAzz for a long time now ... with metal sound ... absolutely love it, and it gets the hands and brain going!! And if you want some really challenginhg soloing, try working out some Charlie Parker lines!!)

I'd suggest checking out some of the Tamla Motown tunes, e.g. "You are everything" ... really nice chord voicings, and unusual in places. These guys chuck in the dims, augmented, maj and min7, inversions, slash chords, but very tastefully.

e.g G maj7, A/G, F#m7. Bm7

x x x x
3 2 2 3
4 2 2 2
4 2 2 4
x x x 2
3 3 2 x

e.g. B, Em/B

x x
4 5
4 4
4 5
2 2
x x

More recent, Jazz version by David Sanborne : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FvwerszrQI&list=RD2FvwerszrQI

A great Jazz tune for chords is "In a sentimental mood" by Duke Ellington. I just transcribed the chords in this for myself (as played by Sonny Rollins) ... load of movement in it, some key changes, some tritone substitutions.

A great version by Sonny Rollins:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EOYYaBBJr_E

A literally beautiful version of this is by a band called "Steps Ahead" with the Brecker brothers. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eBUlmCZhtbo)


I can let you have the transcription (or gpx) but much better is you use your ears with something like Transcribe.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Jan 8, 2016,
#3
Thank you for such a kind answer. I ll try it by ear as you adviced. I shouldn t have so much problems with melodies, but chords?
#4
You can pretty much use extensions like 9ths and 7ths freely on major, minor and dominant chords. This is because adding an extension does not change the FUNCTION of the chords: you still have the fundamental structure of the chord, you're just adding notes on top of it. So if you see a G major, just try playing a Gmaj7 or Gmaj9, etc.

There are places where some extensions don't work, but as long as extension notes of the chords are inside the key you're playing in (aka. diatonic to), it should be OK. You can of course use non-diatonic notes (outside the key), but it might sound weird if you don't know what you're doing.

So if you know how to build chords by stacking thirds, it's simple enough. I won't go into the details of which extensions work and which don't. Just start playing and try them out.

Dim chords generally have the same function as dominant chords. If you don't know what this means, look up chord function or diatonic function.
Last edited by Elintasokas at Jan 8, 2016,
#5
Quote by jozef2451
Thank you for such a kind answer. I ll try it by ear as you adviced. I shouldn t have so much problems with melodies, but chords?


I use software called Transcribe (seventhstring makes it). I'll mark out a small section of the music (literally drag a slider over some part of the presented waveform), and slow it right down (around 35% normal), and then experiment to find the pitches (playing guitar), one at a time if need be. But because I have a working knowledge of chords, most of the time I can tell the chord type, and then the problem reduces to finding a decent guitar voicing (if the original chord is on keyboards, say).

As I said, see how you get on ... and if you'd like the transcription, just send me a private message, and I'll email it (?)
#6
Here s my email: jozef2451@gmail.com
I already installed transcribe. I ll make it by ear and sometimes help myself with your transcription because I want to develop those chords too. I really appreciate it.
#7
Quote by jozef2451
Here s my email: jozef2451@gmail.com
I already installed transcribe. I ll make it by ear and sometimes help myself with your transcription because I want to develop those chords too. I really appreciate it.


Check your email. I've sent you the transcription (pdf and gpx) for the Sonny Rollins version.

Long ago, I was told by many seriously good pro musicians (not just guitarists) that ultimately a musician is as good as his/her chord knowledge. Eventually I realised the truth in this ... plus there are so many amazing sounding chords.

Learning how to use them (as landing chords, passing chords, setup chords) is intellectually straight forward. The fun and games come with the voicings so that the chords connect well.

As you get your theory down, I can recommend a chord dictionary by Scott Henderson... "Jazz guitar Chord system" ... but you will need to understand some theory to make sense of this book. However, the vocings are excellent.

Building your chord knowledge is an ongoing effort ... there are so many voicings and connections ... wouldn't worry about rushing it ... just enjoy it as you pick up more.

Word of warning: if you start trying soloing over these chords, I strongly advise not trying toi chase every chord ... don't try and play a different scale type per chord ... much better to feel comfortable around the tonal centre, and pull out fragments of other scales (especially dominant type scales) leading back to tonal centre. This stuff gets highly addictive.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Jan 9, 2016,