#1
I'm not in a band myself, but i have a friend that gigs around here where he can. normally (from the way he talks) the way they get paid is they just split the door among the band... so depending or how many more people they get into the club the more they get paid... the more they drink so more money for the club... but he's been playing at a place and the way he talks the guy just wants to pay them 50 bucks to play and keeps the door for the club saying that he can't pay them the way the others places have in the past because he needs the money and the electric bill is so high but he'd pay them 500 if they got more people and yadda yadda yadda... but there will be a decent amount of people there anyway tho... more than would be there if there was no one playing at the very least... just wondering what you guys think about that... and what are some ways your bands have been paid... really just curious because i've never dealt with the money side of being a musician ... i'd assume there would be some standard of paying...
Originally posted by adVENTURA
if your in a punk band just do like Lars and Tim in rancid and scream like you got marbles in your mouth.

Check out my Music Here
#2
there is no standard. different areas around the country (US) tend to do things differently. some places pay a flat fee to the band. the percentage of the door thing is popular but as a band you then have to have someone monitor paid admittance or risk getting screwed. in places like L.A. they have a pay to play system. basically a band has to buy so many tickets up front and then sell them to make their money. obviously the more people you can get in the better. sadly this system tends be brutal for new bands and they often lose money.

$50 is way to low for a whole band any way you look at it. his electric bill ain't your problem.
#3
No one can take advantage of you without your permission.

That said, a bar is a business and as a business they need to sell drinks to pay rent, lights, and their employees. The whole point of live entertainment in a bar is to attract and keep customers so they sell more drinks. More drinks = more $$ and happy bar owner who thinks you guys rock! If you have a band that can attract and keep customers, it has value to the bar. How much value depends on you. If you fill the bar to capacity every night you are worth a lot more than the band playing obscure stuff to an empty room.

Decide what kind of band you want to be. Van Halen played every dog and pony show for 5 years all over LA. They didn't care about the money, only that they wanted to play every night and hone their craft. $50-$100 whatever. Over time they figured out how to pack the room every night. The rest is history.

Most bands are not willing to do that and if you have 4 hours of music that attracts and keeps a lot of people, it should be worth at least $400 due to the added drink sales generated through the night. We don't play many bars but if they want us that is the bottom $ for our show. Most of our gigs are private affairs that pay much better but once in a while it is fun to play a local club and invite your friends and fans to come hang out.

If you are just starting out, play a weeknight for $50. Hone your craft and generate good relationships with the owner, servers, and fans. Gradually learn how to attract and hold an audience. When you regularly play to packed houses, raise your fee.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Jan 8, 2016,
#4
Quote by Cajundaddy
No one can take advantage of you without your permission.

That said, a bar is a business and as a business they need to sell drinks to pay rent, lights, and their employees. The whole point of live entertainment in a bar is to attract and keep customers so they sell more drinks. More drinks = more $$ and happy bar owner who thinks you guys rock! If you have a band that can attract and keep customers, it has value to the bar. How much value depends on you. If you fill the bar to capacity every night you are worth a lot more than the band playing obscure stuff to an empty room.

Decide what kind of band you want to be. Van Halen played every dog and pony show for 5 years all over LA. They didn't care about the money, only that they wanted to play every night and hone their craft. $50-$100 whatever. Over time they figured out how to pack the room every night. The rest is history.

Most bands are not willing to do that and if you have 4 hours of music that attracts and keeps a lot of people, it should be worth at least $400 due to the added drink sales generated through the night. We don't play many bars but if they want us that is the bottom $ for our show. Most of our gigs are private affairs that pay much better but once in a while it is fun to play a local club and invite your friends and fans to come hang out.

If you are just starting out, play a weeknight for $50. Hone your craft and generate good relationships with the owner, servers, and fans. Gradually learn how to attract and hold an audience. When you regularly play to packed houses, raise your fee.


i agree with what you are saying but you have to be careful not to shoot yourself in the foot. once you set a presidence for working dirt cheap you may find yourself stuck in it for a very long time. many bar owners these days act like they are doing you a huge favour by letting you play their bar. in some cases this may be true but more often than not they aren't and are just hoping your band brings in business cuz it's really a dump. agree that for your first few shows you do have to kinda take whatever is offered within reason. $50 for a band to haul all their gear, travel time and play for however many hours is kind of a beat deal if you ask me. prety much playing for free.
#5
Quote by monwobobbo
once you set a presidence


Presidence is when you preside over something. I think that the word you meant was precedence, which would still be the wrong word because that means priority. The word that you should have used is precedent.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
Last edited by theogonia777 at Jan 8, 2016,
#6
I have been playing bars/clubs for more than 40 years (I"ll be at one tomorrow night in fact). Like Cajundaddy said there are many different ways bands get paid but it's up to the band to negotiate that with the club before you agree to play. My band plays for a set fee. We are the entertanment. Like the guy who delivers the kegs of beer or the people who supply hamburger patties, we are a commodity and supply entertainment. We are a cover band that plays familiar songs. For me, playing is a fun 2nd job. A job that pays fairly well, encourages me to have fun, have a few drinks and go home with $150 in my pocket (that I don't report for tax purposes) Because we are just a cover band we are not trying to promote ourselves as anything but an entertaining band. Whether there is 200 people in the place or 2 people in the place we have a set deal on the amount we get for playing.

If your friend plays for other reasons like trying build a music career, play original music etc. he has to make whatever deal he can ahead of time and if it is something he cannot live with, he shouldn't do it. Frankly if his band has no better options maybe they should just do it for the experience and build a following, then move on.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Jan 8, 2016,
#7
Quote by theogonia777
Presidence is when you preside over something. I think that the word you meant was precedence, which would still be the wrong word because that means priority. The word that you should have used is precedent.


oh excuse me i didn't realize this was an english class. what the fuck is your problem as you've been on me a lot lately.
#8
Quote by monwobobbo
oh excuse me i didn't realize this was an english class. what the fuck is your problem as you've been on me a lot lately.


If your English were better there wouldn't be a problem here.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#9
Three systems I've run into (playing bars)...

Lump Sum: agreed upon earlier. This is more typical in a situation where you're a cover band and you're playing a multi hour gig over the course of a whole night.

Split the door: you have a cover charge where someone collects money at the door and then that is split among the groups. This is really good if you know you'll have a good draw and aren't counting on pulling foot traffic into the venue. Not many people pay a cover for a band they have never heard of and the venue has little to no reason to promote your show. A $5 cover can turn away a lot of people from a good show.

Split the till: typically no cover and the bar pays the bands a percentage of the money they make from liquor sales at the end of the night. This is ideal for situations where you're hoping to pull foot traffic and just get people interested in your band. It also gives the venue itself an excuse to promote the event. Personally this is my favorite way of going about things. Getting people to go out to see live music is a pain, but getting the attention of drunks with a good performance is easy.
BOOM-SHAKALAKALAKA-BOOM-SHAKALAKUNGA
#10
Quote by theogonia777
If your English were better there wouldn't be a problem here.


whatever. if you don't like my english ignore my posts. i don't see you correcting others here so again what is your problem with me. how about a coherent answer instead of your usual snippy responses. i don't have anything against you.
#11
Quote by monwobobbo
whatever. if you don't like my english ignore my posts.



lmao


anyway,


Yeah, like someone already said, there is no standard. If you can't negotiate something with the owner that seems fair to you, then move on and try playing somewhere else. Obviously, the bigger of a crowd you can draw, the more room you have to negotiate. Or if you're getting paid a percentage of the door, then scope the place out and see what the crowd is generally like on the night you will be playing. See if it will be worth it, or try to bring in a crowd of your own.