#1
Hi guys! I need some advice. I'm a intermediate player that is really big into Iron Maiden at this stage. I can play a few of their songs but my tone is horrible. The advice i'm looking for is with regards to gear and possibly some amp settings as well. I have a old Ibanez S-series (S270) with the standard Ibanez factory installed pickups of the period(Still saving for decent Seymour Duncans LOL.) My amp is a Nux Mighty50x modelling amp and I have the following pedals: Chord DL50 delay, Chord DS50 distortion, Chord CH 50 chorus, Boss OD2r Turbo Overdrive, Nobels Xtreme Distortion(Great for high gain) and a Joyo Hot Plexi( Emulates the JCM800 nicely.) I set my up on the following settings: Gain-6, Level-4, High-5, Mid-7, Bass-4 and Reverb at 4 through the clean channel on the amp. I don't have the money at this stage for a EQ pedal and I have read somewhere that both Dave Murray and Adrian Smith had Wah's in their rigs. Advise on the settings for the amp and maybe the current pedals that I have to improve tone will be appreciated. Thanks
#2
I have never played any of the gear you have, but have you tried using either the British setting or the Metal setting on your amp instead of a distortion pedal? Since the company that makes Nux amps didn't pay to have brand names listed on their gear, I'm fairly certain that the British setting is based on Marshall, which is what Maiden used on their classic albums, and the Metal setting is probably either modeled after Mesa or the Peavey 5150 (6505). If you aren't getting enough crunch, especially on the British setting, try using the overdrive as a boost. Also, remember that trying to emulate a band's studio sound is rather difficult with all the studio tricks used to get a good tone on a recording. Look up a pro shot live video for a more obtainable goal. I hope that helps.
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#3
Quote by Nolasludge
but have you tried using either the British setting or the Metal setting on your amp instead of a distortion pedal?

This. With modellers, it's sometimes better to use the built-in distortion instead of a pedal up front.
You seem to have the right idea far as settings go; you want something middy and not too much gain for a Maiden kind of tone.


However, there is only so much you can get out of a beginner's modeller like this one. Haven't played it myself, but having listened to some demos on youtube, I think it's a nice enough piece of kit to start out with, but eventually you will want to upgrade.
And no pedal in the world can save you in that regard - your tone depends on your amp first and foremost.
So I'd recommend you stop buying pedals unless you desperately need them, and start saving your money for a better amp.
#4
As a long time Ibanez user - YOU HAVE GOT TO CHANGE THOSE STOCK PICKUPS!!!!

That, my friend, is the first thing you do with an Ibanez. They're horrible.

The muddiness...the weakness...the pure wimpy power of the "v" and "s" pickups is legendary.

I'm sure they put them in there because they know we're going to change them anyway. It's the only thing that makes sense with a good quality brand like Ibanez.

Anyhow...you must start there. You cannot shape your tone correctly without doing that first. After that...put whatever you want in there.
#5
I would disagree about the pickups at this stage. New pickups into the pedals and amp TS has now would not make that much difference. A better amp will make much more difference. Then maybe change out the pickups later.
#6
I would suggest trying out the british setting as mentioned above or try out a new amp in general. Something by Marshall would be good, like the dsl
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#7
Amp is definitely priority. Based on the number of gain-based pedals you have, I'd go for a Blackstar HT amp. There's different sizes for different applications, obviously. I found the gain on them to be a little bit lacking but boosting it with an OD pedal changes everything. Beyond that, you can find used Crybaby wahs for like $50 (Canadian) pretty easily. Good luck!
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#8
Quote by WeZ-84
I would disagree about the pickups at this stage. New pickups into the pedals and amp TS has now would not make that much difference. A better amp will make much more difference. Then maybe change out the pickups later.


I really disagree here.

What you are suggesting is like putting spices and candy sprinkles on a turd.

You have to hit the first place where the actual soundwave is created - and that's the pickups.

When I was younger I went through years of aggravation trying to get a decent tone buy getting pedals...processors...amp...etc. While all of that definitely helped, it didn't solve the problem.

Which is cheaper anyhow? You can get a bad ass pickup for 50 bucks.
#9
Quote by pressureproject
I really disagree here.

What you are suggesting is like putting spices and candy sprinkles on a turd.

You have to hit the first place where the actual soundwave is created - and that's the pickups.

When I was younger I went through years of aggravation trying to get a decent tone buy getting pedals...processors...amp...etc. While all of that definitely helped, it didn't solve the problem.

Which is cheaper anyhow? You can get a bad ass pickup for 50 bucks.

nah mate. The pickups are the finishing touch. First you need a base for your tone, which is a decent amp. then all the other things like pickups and pedals.
Well, you can call me crazy
You can call me wrong, 'cause
See I was born a liar, albatross
Fly on, fly on
#10
Quote by pressureproject
I really disagree here.

What you are suggesting is like putting spices and candy sprinkles on a turd.

You have to hit the first place where the actual soundwave is created - and that's the pickups.

When I was younger I went through years of aggravation trying to get a decent tone buy getting pedals...processors...amp...etc. While all of that definitely helped, it didn't solve the problem.

Which is cheaper anyhow? You can get a bad ass pickup for 50 bucks.

No, your are straight up dead wrong. Amp first, then pickups.

I agree that most Ibanez stock pickups aren't great, but with a good amp, they're passable. But no pickup in the world can make a cheap starter amp sound good.
#11
Thanx for the advice. Will look at the pick ups but being on a budget a Marshall is a little out of reach at this stage. Would love to have one though.
#12
Quote by TheQuailman
No, your are straight up dead wrong. Amp first, then pickups.

I agree that most Ibanez stock pickups aren't great, but with a good amp, they're passable. But no pickup in the world can make a cheap starter amp sound good.

Yeah, TheQuailman is right. Don't bother with the pickups yet. Of course eventually, you'll want some new ones, but I have heard a $100 Fender Squire sound amazing through a decent amp, so if the amp is your problem, which it is, that will be the first place to go. Since you don't have the money for an EQ pedal, than you probably can't afford a new amp good enough to be a proper upgrade, so try the British setting, and maybe boost it with your overdrive and see if that helps. There are videos on YouTube that show you the different ways that you can use overdrive pedals.
Gibson Les Paul 60s Tribute
Jackson King V
Peavey Valveking 100
Ampeg VH140C
Boss TU-3 Chromatic Tuner
MXR ZW-44 Overdrive
Dunlop ZW-45 Wah
Boss NS-2 Noise Suppressor
Digitech JamMan Solo XT
Peavey Vypyr VIP 1
#13
Quote by TheQuailman
This. With modellers, it's sometimes better to use the built-in distortion instead of a pedal up front.
You seem to have the right idea far as settings go; you want something middy and not too much gain for a Maiden kind of tone.

However, there is only so much you can get out of a beginner's modeller like this one. Haven't played it myself, but having listened to some demos on youtube, I think it's a nice enough piece of kit to start out with, but eventually you will want to upgrade.
And no pedal in the world can save you in that regard - your tone depends on your amp first and foremost.So I'd recommend you stop buying pedals unless you desperately need them, and start saving your money for a better amp.
+1
#14
Quote by pressureproject
I really disagree here.

What you are suggesting is like putting spices and candy sprinkles on a turd.

You have to hit the first place where the actual soundwave is created - and that's the pickups.

When I was younger I went through years of aggravation trying to get a decent tone buy getting pedals...processors...amp...etc. While all of that definitely helped, it didn't solve the problem.

Which is cheaper anyhow? You can get a bad ass pickup for 50 bucks.


Lots of good advice in this thread, except this. This is really bad advice in this case.

Honestly, if where the sound wave is created is important then you are either talking about the strings, which create the initial sound and the movement that is converted into electricity, or you're talking about the sound wave that you actually hear from the amp, and that begins immediately at the edge of the speaker cone as it vibrates.

I'm mainly being asinine here, because I think you mean the electrical signal begins at the pickups, which is true. Still doesn't change the fact pickups in this case are not going to be an effective means to improve this guy's tone or set up.
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#15
Actually pickups and amps tend to be more nuances than dramatic changes.

I think the most valid advice I've seen here is to use the inboard effects on the modeling amp as much as possible. The next most likely culprit that's getting in the way of a good metal tone is going to be settings. The most common issue I see with people first going after these sorts of tones is overdoing things like overdrives, reverb/delays, and EQ...and in doing so make the sound muddy with very little articulation.

Start with a Marshall JCM amp model if you have one in the amp with flat EQ and relatively clean or slightly crunchy tone, then slowly add overdrive until you get on the verge of not being able to hear individual strings clearly. Then slowly and carefully adjust EQ to get the "in your face" kind of tone out of the mids with some decent (but not overpowering) bottom end. If your modeler includes a parametric EQ or any EQ with a low cut filter, try cutting around 80hz or maybe slightly above that to keep the crispness and articulation in the low notes. This will also help in not muddying up the "in your face" mids.

Once you have a nice powerful but articulated tone then add delay/reverb but keep it to a minimum. Too much of this is another way of muddying up the sound.
Last edited by dunedindragon at Jan 11, 2016,