#1
This might be old hat for some, but I was playing with my new looping pedal and found another handy use for it. Before, I used to set the tone knobs to some positions, play a little, stop playing, re-set the tone knobs, etc. With the loop playing, I can take all the time I want and hear the changes in real time. Made the process way faster and I could explore a much bigger range of settings since I didn't have to keep starting and stopping every time.
#3
Basically, yeah. I realize it's super simple, but I found it much easier to listen to the tone when I wasn't also thinking about playing at the same time.
#4
Nice, pretty simple idea, but I never thought of it. Now your just making me want to go out and buy a looper even more.

Unrelated note, another cool use for a looper I have seen is to create ambient sounds by looping the middle of a chord (don't loop the strum) and using a volume pedal or the knob on your guitar to create swells.
^ Probably a load of crap

Gear

PRS SE Custom 24
Fender Squier Strat
Washburn D10SCE

Vox AC30C2
Roland MicroCube
Fender frontman 15G
#5
Ideally a looper should be in the fx loop if your amp has one.


Having it in the fx loop lets you use different preamp settings on top of each other i.e clean chord progression, distorted lead tone etc.

Also it will sound a lot less muddy than just having it in the front of the amp.


Having it in the fx loop however will prevent you from using it as you said above because the signal has already been colored by the preamp and therefore wont change when you alter your preamp settings.
#6
The Original Post highlights a great way to explore an amp's controls and response. Once the preferred amp settings are discovered, having the Looper in the FX Loop is a more flexible way to go as rickyj mentioned.
Mustang v2 III/IV●EXP-1●FUSE●REMUDA●Yamaha THR10C
Epi LP Florentine Pro●LP Cstm Pros●LP PlusTop Pro●Sheraton-II Pro
Cstm Strat Vntg Noiseless●Guild D-55
So Creek Cables●BOSS RC-1●RS7500
D'Addario Strings●Vari-Grip●Planet Lock Straps
#7
What you describe is a process called Re-Amping. Very common in recording studio situations, although usually not done with a looper pedal. You run the raw guitar output straight into the recording interface while you lay down a track, focusing on just getting the physical performance perfect, even though it won't sound right using digital amp sims. Once you've got a perfect take, that raw guitar track is sent to the amp, and you can just hit play and mess with your settings while your ghost plays the guitar. Once you've dialed in the tone just how you want it, you stick a mic in front of the amp, play the track from the start, sit back and smoke a joint while your amp plays itself.

Also very useful for when you want to have a bunch of different takes of the same guitar part with different effects or amp settings to choose from, but don't want to wear yourself out playing it a thousand times. Or if the part is particularly complex, and it was hard enough getting one perfect take, let alone a dozen.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#8
Quote by the_bi99man
What you describe is a process called Re-Amping. Very common in recording studio situations, although usually not done with a looper pedal. You run the raw guitar output straight into the recording interface while you lay down a track, focusing on just getting the physical performance perfect, even though it won't sound right using digital amp sims. Once you've got a perfect take, that raw guitar track is sent to the amp, and you can just hit play and mess with your settings while your ghost plays the guitar. Once you've dialed in the tone just how you want it, you stick a mic in front of the amp, play the track from the start, sit back and smoke a joint while your amp plays itself.

Also very useful for when you want to have a bunch of different takes of the same guitar part with different effects or amp settings to choose from, but don't want to wear yourself out playing it a thousand times. Or if the part is particularly complex, and it was hard enough getting one perfect take, let alone a dozen.
This is a common technique. Use your amp's FX I/O Loop Send to route the guitar as a Direct In (DI) feed, to a dedicated ISO(loated) track in your DAW. This gives plenty of replay opportunity to apply FX, do part doubling, editing, and more. Obviously, your amp has to have an FX I/O Loop, or you'll need a DI box to pull a DI signal without depriving the signal fed to the amp.
Mustang v2 III/IV●EXP-1●FUSE●REMUDA●Yamaha THR10C
Epi LP Florentine Pro●LP Cstm Pros●LP PlusTop Pro●Sheraton-II Pro
Cstm Strat Vntg Noiseless●Guild D-55
So Creek Cables●BOSS RC-1●RS7500
D'Addario Strings●Vari-Grip●Planet Lock Straps
#9
Quote by the_bi99man
What you describe is a process called Re-Amping. Very common in recording studio situations, although usually not done with a looper pedal. You run the raw guitar output straight into the recording interface while you lay down a track, focusing on just getting the physical performance perfect, even though it won't sound right using digital amp sims. Once you've got a perfect take, that raw guitar track is sent to the amp, and you can just hit play and mess with your settings while your ghost plays the guitar. Once you've dialed in the tone just how you want it, you stick a mic in front of the amp, play the track from the start, sit back and smoke a joint while your amp plays itself.


Not to sound stupid, but does this mean that a DI box can work in both directions? I've been putting a DI box between my guitar and amp and running the DI output into my mixing board (panned all the way to the left) while the mic'ed amp is sent to the mixing board as well (panned all the way to the right). This gives me an idea of what I sound like while recording (the amp sound) and along with a backup, "virgin" guitar copy that I have been using for software amp'ing and effects in case I wasn't happy with the mic'ed up sound. After recoding, I cut the stereo track into two mono tracks so I have a mic'ed guitar sound as well as the direct sound from the DI box and use one, the other or both to build the rest of the song.

If I understand what you mean, I would take the "virgin" recording of the guitar made the way I'm already doing (into the mixing board from the DI box), then connect what would normally the the output of the DI box to the output of the mixing board, hit Play and run the "virgin" guitar track through the amp, effects pedals, etc. and mic up the cabinet. This effectively runs the DI box backward from the way I normally use it. Do I have this right? I can really see how this would be an incredibly useful technique while recording.