#1
Been playing guitar for about 7 years now, finally got a Bass for Christmas, love the thing so far.

Anyways, any good scales to learn or general tips to help get me started?

Thanks
-GingerElvis
#2
Quote by GingerElvis
Been playing guitar for about 7 years now, finally got a Bass for Christmas, love the thing so far.

Anyways, any good scales to learn or general tips to help get me started?

Thanks
-GingerElvis

Never learnt a single scale, used the chords instead.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#4
When I first joined the military band I was thrown in at the deep end, because the regular Upright Bassist for the dance band was on leave.
At that stage I couldn't read music fluently so I worked from the chords of the Guitar pad.
At the end of the night I apologised to the NCO leading the band for my lack of ability regarding reading.
The bandleader said "If you can play like you did tonight working just from the chords the job is yours permanently" We even played one 8 hour dance where the dance band and the rock band were booked. The rhythm section of the dance band along with the singer who played trumpet in the dance band. played throughout the night and got double pay.
As a bassist I still play and work from the chords other than certain songs like Hotel California where there is a dominant recognised Bass Riff.

For the record I am all for learning theory BTW.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
Last edited by John Swift at Jan 13, 2016,
#5
Quote by Deliriumbassist
What have you learnt theory wise for guitar?


Not much theory wise, I play mostly by ear (lol).
#6
One thing that theory gives you is an international language, In the right situation it is priceless.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#7
It wouldn't hurt to learn a little theory on the bass. You can't sound as impressive hitting notes like you would chords on the guitar.

Then again just can simply go with what you know on guitar, pentatonics, extend that to blues scales. Major and Minor are simple as well and give you a little more freedom.

I think what you need to consider is the different muscles or hand techniques you'll be using when you play the bass. If you do stuff like finger permutations, the speed and precision of your practice on the guitar won't be as great on the bass, so I recommend you start thinking about technique practice.
how do you edit signature?
#8
Quote by arvarna
It wouldn't hurt to learn a little theory on the bass. You can't sound as impressive hitting notes like you would chords on the guitar.

Knowledge of chord structures is a great help, I see so many young people root note bashing when there is so much more to play ie Minors, Sevenths, Augmenteds, Diminished etc.
Very early on I also found learning intervals a great help but I was lucky that in the evenings when I was an army musician and studying for my trade pay and entrance qualifications to the military school of music I went to a senior NCOs house for tuition, what he taught me will always stay with me.
A final exam at the military school of music was to arrange 8 bars of piano music for the full military band. This consisted of everything from piccolo, woodwind, saxes, brass and percussion.
A bonus was being able to tell numpties "no it isn't D# its Eb".
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
Last edited by John Swift at Jan 15, 2016,
#9
First tip: Whatever you play, play a lot of it. Compared to guitar the bass is a strength instrument.

Second tip: Regarding theory - learn the "Circle of Fifths", major and minor scales, and basic chord structure

Final tip: Learn the bass line to songs that you like. Play along. Pay attention to how the notes follow the chords played by the guitarist and/or keyboardist. Listen to how the bass player is in sync (hopefully) with the drummer.
#10
Don't do what I do and play a guitar head into a bass cabinet with everything cranked and basically sound like Lemmy fucked the Ramones.
Cry yourself to ash
#11
Try thinking in terms of rhythm rather than melody / leads etc. It's up to the bass player to lock with the drums and lay the foundations - don't try to compete with the guitar line, compliment it.
"I didn't mean to kill nobody ... I just meant to shoot the sonofabitch in the head. Him dying was between him and the Lord." RL Burnside.

"I won't waste my love on a nation" BRMC
#12
Quote by RubberSoul54321
Try thinking in terms of rhythm rather than melody / leads etc. It's up to the bass player to lock with the drums and lay the foundations - don't try to compete with the guitar line, compliment it.

Good advice
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#13
As already said, major/ minor scales, and practice technique, for example being able to fret strings with all four fingers, will stand you well. A big part of what we basists do is rhythm and playing with feel, you can get away with, and recover from playing a few bum notes on a gig, but lose the groove and every one will know. Practice playing with a metronome, or better yet, get some drum loops of different types of music, and in different time signatures.
#14
my advice:
1) Get the thing set up by a pro. Bass setup and intonation is much more crucial than on guitar. Producing single notes instead of chords, it's imperative that it sound "right."
2) Learn proper fingering techniques. Before I started lessons when I was little, I used the "migrating claw" to play. Once I learned how to properly walk my fingers, my playing got much faster and cleaner.
3) Get good strings. A lot of starter basses come with really harsh strings. A good set of strings will make it sound better, make it more comfortable and encourage you to play more.
4) Learn scales, keys and the circle of fifths. These are universal languages that span all instruments and having an understanding of these, you'll be able to adapt much better to your playing situations.
5) Don't upgrade the bass, upgrade the rest. While most starter basses usually come with subpar elecronics, in the case of Bass (versus guitar) your amp is the main determiner of tone. I've got three basses: one vintage wound, one hot wound, one QTR-Pounder (all alder bodied P-basses). On cheap amp, that tone doesn't come through too different between the three. Running through a good amp, you'll get much more articulation, clarity and thump to your tone.
Fact: Bears eat beats. Bears beats Battlestar Galactica.