#1
Slightly more than two years and I am wondering if I should start learning to play guitar in classical position. I'm a metalhead and plan on getting a V in the future, besides it looks cool and I heard it has some advantages. I also read it could bridge the gap between sitting and standing.

If yes, please link to some basic guidelines. How high should my footstool be if I'm 6'?
#2
The V is actually very comfortable to play. I normally do not play in classical position, but the v just fits right in that position and is extremely comfortable. I regret getting rid of mine but couldn't pass up on the trade being offered for it. I am after another...eventually.
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#3
I have never felt the need to play in classical position. It is not hard and essential with a V guitar when sitting.

Do what you feel you need to.
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#4
Quote by josonmj
Slightly more than two years and I am wondering if I should start learning to play guitar in classical position. I'm a metalhead and plan on getting a V in the future, besides it looks cool and I heard it has some advantages. I also read it could bridge the gap between sitting and standing.

If yes, please link to some basic guidelines. How high should my footstool be if I'm 6'?


i have a rhoads and it's pretty easy to play with the notch locked into your leg but ime can get uncomfortable going into the second hour of play which is why i bought a warrior.

as far as a footblock goes imo, why bother? you can play the thing on a guitar stool just as well. i'm 6'7" and i do find that my left heel likes to be up about 3" or so but i don't rest it on anything, it just tends to go up and stay there and i don't pay attention to it. i'm sure it doesn't look cool though. maybe i should put a brick on something under there but probably not. v's are made for standing up anyway.

fyi, the early v's from gibson used to have a rubber strip glued onto on the bottom edge in a shallow pocket. it was totally useless and left sticky goop on your guitar when it finally fell off.
Last edited by ad_works at Jan 12, 2016,
#5
Vs are great, but I wouldn't worry about until you get one. Then you can see what works best for you.
#6
Until I played on my first V, I never played in classical position. However, when I first got my V, I didn't had any difficulty in transitioning to that position. In fact, I liked it so much that now I play almost every guitar (and even my bass) in a classical-like position: The difference being, I don't use a footstool. I just put the instrument between my legs and tilt the neck upwards.

As it was mentioned already, don't bother too much with it until you actually get a V. Just my 2 cents anyway, if you really want to try it, then go ahead.

If you can't get comfortable with it, you could always play the V standing.
Last edited by DanyFS at Jan 12, 2016,
#8
i think there's something to be said about being able to play in different positions. when i realized that my picking hand was way less able while i was standing up, i worked through it and learned some things about muscle isolation that probably helped my playing mechanics overall.

on whether the classical position looks cool while playing electric, i have to disagree with you.
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#9
The real benefit about classical position is keeping your wrists straight so that you won't develop carpal tunnel syndrome. I find it much more comfortable for long hours of playing but if you are going to play live standing it kind of defeats the purpose.
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#10
Quote by josonmj
I'm a metalhead and plan on getting a V in the future, besides it looks cool and I heard it has some advantages. I also read it could bridge the gap between sitting and standing.


What's wrong with your legs? Stand up man, that's what a V is meant for and no need to 'bridge the gap' then. Never been to a metal concert where they sit down
#12
Quote by cdgraves
You should use the classical position any time you work on technically difficult stuff. It helps keep your wrist flat so you avoid tension and injuries.


I have some family history of both wrist and back problems (my dad has had two wrist surgeries already), and I'm starting to develop similar problems too. I play in classical position because it's better for my back and my wrists. I don't really care about how it looks or what other people think, that's the only way I can comfortably do it
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#13
I'm not talking about gigging, seriously you can't expect me to stand at all times while playing guitar (P.S. I cannot play standing yet either). The idea of playing in the classical position without a footstool appeals to me very much. What do you recommend? Will this solve injury problems as well?
#14
Quote by josonmj
I'm not talking about gigging, seriously you can't expect me to stand at all times while playing guitar (P.S. I cannot play standing yet either). The idea of playing in the classical position without a footstool appeals to me very much. What do you recommend? Will this solve injury problems as well?


Right now, I don't gig either, only playing at home. I know how it's much better to play sitting when at home, since I'm a lazy fuck as well But I still play standing sometimes, and I think you should learn it even if not gigging.

Now to answer your questions, personally I would recommend trying out the classical position without a footstool. Since I started playing like that, I felt much more comfortable, because my arm doesn't needs to hold the neck anymore and as such, my playing became much more relaxed, accurate and faster. It's one of those things I wish I did since the beginning.

As others have mentioned, it will also help your wrists keep straight and you can have a better sitting position for your back. As such, you will have less problems with injuries.

Seriously, just try it out and see how it goes. If you feel like you need your left leg more elevated or something, try out a footstool. I personally don't need one.
Last edited by DanyFS at Jan 13, 2016,
#15
I tried and I liked though it will take me some more time to get used to it. Could someone give me more info as I feel my guitar isn't resting well on my right leg.

I have barely any knowledge here.
#16
Quote by josonmj
I tried and I liked though it will take me some more time to get used to it. Could someone give me more info as I feel my guitar isn't resting well on my right leg.

I have barely any knowledge here.


What's the shape of your guitar? Can you post any pics of how you are holding it?

Some shapes work better than others for classical position. For example, I don't like to play SG style guitars in classical position.