#1
Not gonna do a vote like will'worship'lane , just looking for advice.

Im 19 and about to start my 3rd year of a EE engineering degree. I've also never had a real job. Only volunteer work for a couple of days and some work experience I did in HS.

My mate reckons he can get me a casual job at a parking lot where he works. I'd work 10+ hour shifts once a week (on weekends)

I dont need the job for money as im living at home itd be nice but what im really worried about is experience. Ive applied to two engineering places already and been bounced both times and I think its due to my lack of experience. They were both listed as for undergraduates so I dont think it was due to a lack of education.

so should I go for the parking job to beef up my resume or keep trying for something in my field and hope I get lucky.

Also I know parking has nothing to do with electrical engineering but itd be better than having no employment history on my CV.
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#2
If you don't need the cash, skip it and look for an internship.
BOOM-SHAKALAKALAKA-BOOM-SHAKALAKUNGA
#3
Quote by snipelfritz
If you don't need the cash, skip it and look for an internship.

This. Any internships or field specific experience you can get is what will make a difference.
#4
Yeah I'm thinking of doing that but whenever I apply somewhere I feel like I'm starting on the back foot before I've even got an interview.
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#5
Beefing up your resume with irrelevant experience is ill-advised. The best thing you can do is speak with advisory at your school, or 'writing/resume critique center'
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#6
yeah I went to one of those resume writing seminars but they won't individually look at your resume unless you also have a position you're trying to apply for. next time I find something I'll probably get them to have a look.
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#7
Also, don't worry too much about not having a full resume, as long as the blank space is pretty uniform from top:bottom left:right. Employers aren't going to expect experience from students.

But one consultant that visited my uni gave me a tip for cover letters: Have a 'passion paragraph' for the second paragraph where you go on about something that inspires/interests you (and try to tie it in to electrical engineering/that company's biz). Don't be afraid to gloat a bit if you're not used to it, and just exude greatness n whatnot
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#8
haha yeah I hate having to talk myself up when applying, I much prefer everyone just think I'm competent and then blow them away when I do something great.
cheers for the advice dude
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#10
Quote by Fat Lard
Also, don't worry too much about not having a full resume, as long as the blank space is pretty uniform from top:bottom left:right. Employers aren't going to expect experience from students.

But one consultant that visited my uni gave me a tip for cover letters: Have a 'passion paragraph' for the second paragraph where you go on about something that inspires/interests you (and try to tie it in to electrical engineering/that company's biz). Don't be afraid to gloat a bit if you're not used to it, and just exude greatness n whatnot


and never template your cover letters outside of basic structure. You will be lucky to get an interview with a boring uninspired cover letter. All you're doing by taking shortcuts on a cover letter is showing the employer that you don't have any ability to sell yourself and won't be able to sell yourself to customers, or that you're lazy and can't be bothered to take 10 minutes to write a new 2 or 3 paragraph cover letter bullshitting them into thinking you are any more qualified for the job than any of the other 200 students applying for it.

You don't have experience, so outside of maybe charity work, you don't have anything to use to sell yourself except the cover letter.

Edit: oh yeah and you're also going to be an engineer, so networking is pretty damn important. You need to go to as many fairs as possible and meet as many people as possible. It doesn't hurt to attend random industry (IEEE) events as you're bound to meet EE's at them.

But yeah, I wouldn't both with the job if you're don't need it. It's going to be a mostly pointless addition to your resume. The employer knows you have absolutely no useful skills (even with a 4 year degree), they just want to see that you have a brain and a personality and would be willing to pursue a future at the company (you're interested in the field).
Last edited by CaptainRon at Jan 13, 2016,
#11
Quote by Rossenrot
Does your school offer student employment?

They employ tutors for some of the first year subjects but those positions are usually taken by postgrads.
I remember there being the opportunity to assist some of the researchers at the uni during summer holidays, but I can't find any details atm.

@CaptainRon thanks for this, I've heard the template thing b4 and I've avoided doing that but man do I hate networking, necessary evil I guess.
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#12
Take it because its better than nothing on your CV. Employers will appreciate experience that's outside of an academic environment.
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#13
Other volunteer work is your best bet if you're still worried about your intro resume. Volunteered (for scholarship reasons) as a YMCA group leader and seabird sanctuary worker which gave me some leadership/etc things to bs, which helped me get an internship for junior-senior years.

I'd recommend that to help spice it up, even if its just for a few weeks or whatnot.


But the parking lot job adds nothing to an engineering resume, and is a waste of your time if you do not currently need the money.
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#14
Personally, I don't think taking that type of job would help you much. It's not impressive when trying to get a job in the engineering fields. As an undergraduate if you are unable to find internships, i strongly recommend that you try to get involved in research. Usually this will amount to volunteer work (unless you're lucky), but you WILL be getting relevant career experience. If your university doesn't have many opportunities for research available, apply to summer research programs for undergrads in addition to internships.

Another benefit to doing research as an undergrad is that it will help keep graduate school open as an option to you. Internships and "real" work experience are often less impressive to admissions committees and will not result in as strong of letters of rec either.

I don't know what you're looking to do, but this is just my personal suggestion as a (biased) current grad student.
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#15
i really doubt any of your potential employers are going to care about a parking lot job. i was studying EE/CS and didn't get any work experience until i got an internship in my third year - turned out okay. keep applying to related internships.
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#16
As someone who graduated in may with a BS in EE, apply to as may internships as possible, interview as much as possible, don't give up applying for good experience in the field.