#1
Sorry, I have no idea what it's called...

but I'm trying to get that bend in Texas Flood where Stevie bends the 8th fret of the E string and also partially gets the 8th fret on the B. It sounds massive.

I'm working on this but not having much luck at all. How is it done?
#2
It's simply very difficult, much like the Hendrix bend where he catches the upper string on the way down from a bend.

For the Stevie bend - you need to roll the two strings close to each other under your third finger so that they are like one and then bend. Fret on the high E and lift it slightly and catch the B string with the same finger - then bend.

It's a really touch technique that even most pro's can't pull off.
#3
Quote by RyanMW2010
Sorry, I have no idea what it's called...

but I'm trying to get that bend in Texas Flood where Stevie bends the 8th fret of the E string and also partially gets the 8th fret on the B. It sounds massive.

I'm working on this but not having much luck at all. How is it done?


its an albert king trademark..one reason its a bit difficult for most is trying to get the minor third bend..albert played upside down so his high strings were on top of the fretboard so he bent strings down instead of up..plus the fact he had enormous hands..it has been said he had his flying V customized with wider frets..

I would start with half step bends until they become natural..then full step..now getting BOTH the high E and B strings to be part of the bend is going to take some time and work so it sound clean..light guage strings will help a lot as well as low action and a well set up neck..give your self a few months to get this technique to feel natural
play well

wolf