#1
So Jet did that thing about jazz a while back talking about whatever. Would anybody be interested in me doing something like that but with twangy hillbilly music? I don't know what specifically I would talk about. It could be common country progressions and licks that relate to them or an outline of certain techniques and licks using them or how to apply concepts from country other genres like rock and jazz.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#2
I'm not really an aspiring country guitarist or anything but if you'll write one I'll read it and try to learn something. I think it would be interesting.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#3
To reply to the title, that's just orthography -they both begin with [k] phonetically :')
Glad to cross paths with you on this adventure called life
Quote by Jet Penguin
lots of flirting with the other key without confirming. JUST LIKE THEIR LOVE IN THE MOVIE OH DAMN.
Quote by Hail
you're acting like you have perfect pitch or something
#5
I'm up for it! There's always something new to learn from an expert in any particular style.
#7
As long as there isn't any hillbilly slang (this is coming from someone who's lived in Tennessee for going on 12-years), I think it's a great idea. You could discuss things like Chet Atkins and bluegrass soloing. I think it'd be cool to see an analysis of "Hog Bitch Stomp" by Buckethead (it definitely has a bluegrass sound and is really cool).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJ2CDH18YL8
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#8
Sounds like the chicken went from the bucket to his fingers.
Glad to cross paths with you on this adventure called life
Quote by Jet Penguin
lots of flirting with the other key without confirming. JUST LIKE THEIR LOVE IN THE MOVIE OH DAMN.
Quote by Hail
you're acting like you have perfect pitch or something
#9
Quote by NeoMvsEu
Sounds like the chicken went from the bucket to his fingers.


Buckethead may be my guitar idol but that's hilarious. I'm not a country guitarist nor plan to be but I think a country music anaylsis/theory talk would be pretty cool and interesting (it's always good to expand one's horizons). Like everyone else has said, go for it. Can't wait to see your articles.

By the way my bass hero is probably Scott Pilgrim (yes he's a fictional character but in the movie, his basslines make good use of root notes). My composing heroes are Yoko Shimomura (Kingdom Hearts for life!) and Hans Zimmer (my favorite film composer).
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#10
Quote by RonaldPoe
By the way my bass hero is probably Scott Pilgrim (yes he's a fictional character but in the movie, his basslines make good use of root notes).


This is a huge pet peeve of mine. There's nothing wrong with liking the music of a fictional character, that's all cool But it still bugs me that there is someone working behind these characters, writing their music and recording their songs who never get recognition. I'm going to flip the next time I see someone calling Skwisgaar the best metal guitarist ever.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#12
I get what you mean, Kev. I'm a big fan of Metalocalypse (I hope the finale/season 5 comes soon) but Swisgaar's parts are played and written by Brendon Small (a respectable guitarist in his own right). Small has played with the likes of Joe Satriani and Steve Vai in addition to having Gene Hogan as his drummer. He's an awesome guitarist and deserves credit for it.

Can't wait for the country lesson thing.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#13
Do it up. I'll be here in my alternate dimension; summon me if you need me.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#15
Quote by RonaldPoe
By the way my bass hero is probably Scott Pilgrim
Young Neil was better.
Si
#16
Yeah, but Stills was always the talent.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#18
I'll probably start with a basic thing on scales and harmony and some basic phrasing and basic technique stuff.

I want to also do a more in depth thing on incorporating banjo and steel licks since most lessons on those are pretty bad in that the phrasing sounds nothing like phrasing on banjo or steel and it is very evident that the authors have never played either.

Quote by Duaneclapdrix
I want you to tall about how you ornament melodies on a banjo.

Then I will do that on guitar


Grace notes, usually hammer-ons or slides from a fret down. And then you add generic banjo fill licks at gaps in the melody line. That's really it.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
Last edited by theogonia777 at Jan 21, 2016,
#20
Sounds great! I personally love bluegrass, Appalachian mountain music and NYC-style folk.

My favourite musicians of the Irish tradition are mostly influenced by the American folk styles. Andy Irvine idolised Woody Guthrie. Terry Woods will pick a mean Appalachian banjo if you ask him to.

I've neglected my Irish trad guitar playing recently. But at the moment I'm working on an interpretation of Turlough O Carolan's Planxty Irwin. It's a 300 year old tune, and its fascinating to listen to how performers from different parts of the country interpret it differently.

I'd also be interested in hearing that version of Jingle Bells
#21
Quote by Duaneclapdrix
I just remember you posting yourself playing jingle bells on the banjo and thing getting progressively more complicated with each restatement. I thought it was pretty neat and wondered about your thought process.


http://vocaroo.com/i/s129usBOm72n

That? All I'm doing is playing the melody and adding chord tones and a few arbitrary open string notes in between.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#22
I think it would be great as the approach tends to be much stricter to chordal harmony than a diatonic key in nature. When the chord goes to the IV you can hear the melody shades it as opposes to "playing in the neighborhood". Thats something I really think is under rated about this kind of music. You can actually "hear" the changes through the melody, and that's a valuable skill set.

Go for it. I've long held that this style is one of the hardest to do, and do well. Because it's not just scales or carpetbombing a progression with blues licks.

Best,

Sean
#23
Weirdly enough, I got way better at country after I started trying to play jazz. Probably because you're trying to play over so many chords that that the slower harmonic rythm of country feels a bit easier. And somtimes country does that III7 VI7 II7 V7 thing just like rhythm changes. Like in "country boy". So there is some overlap in regards to hitting the changes. Plus all that western swing stuff.
Last edited by Duaneclapdrix at Jan 24, 2016,
#24
^Same. Bach and Trane took my country chops through the roof.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#26
I've been too busy playing with my bender.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.