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#2
Is this that one where everyone was like "omg it's a dyson sphere!!!!!"
___

Quote by The_Blode
she was saying things like... do you want to netflix and chill but just the chill part...too bad she'll never know that I only like the Netflix part...
#3
aliens.jpg
Seattle Seahawks


Quote by chookiecookie
i feel like you have an obsession with aubrey plaza.


Quote by WCPhils
at least we can all agree SGstriker is the woooooooooooooooooooooorst
#4
Based on the article, comets aren't ruled out, just more unlikely than initially thought.
My guess is something else entirely. Like maybe some undiscovered element getting burned up in uneven portions.
#6
I've been watching Ancient Aliens and that show is pretty low-key educational. They have lots of historic tidbits, so I've been learning
.
#8
Quote by WCPhils
Is this that one where everyone was like "omg it's a dyson sphere!!!!!"


Vacuum cleaner technology has come a long way it seems.
o()o

Quote by JamSessionFreak
yes every night of my entire life i go to bed crying because i wasnt born american
#9
like i said before, the mystery existing is pretty awesome but the alien stuff is stupid

Quote by Joshua Garcia
Based on the article, comets aren't ruled out, just more unlikely than initially thought.
My guess is something else entirely. Like maybe some undiscovered element getting burned up in uneven portions.

there are almost certainly no more naturally occuring elements to be found and if there are they sure as hell arent coming from 'living' stars


Gozd in gora poj,
silen ženimo hrup,
uboga gmajna, le vpup, le vkup,
le vkup, le vkup z menoj,
staro pravdo v mrak tulimo,
da se pretulimo skozi to zimo
#11
Quote by JamSessionFreak
there are almost certainly no more naturally occuring elements to be found and if there are they sure as hell arent coming from 'living' stars
I wouldn't see why not…?
#12
Quote by JamSessionFreak
like i said before, the mystery existing is pretty awesome but the alien stuff is stupid


there are almost certainly no more naturally occuring elements to be found and if there are they sure as hell arent coming from 'living' stars

I wouldn't quite say that just yet.
The universe is pretty fucking big.

All we have right now are some people that are supposed to be really smart just making guesses, mostly based on guesses made by other supposedly smart people before them, and before them, etc.

We have no clue what is really out there.
#14
Quote by Joshua Garcia
I wouldn't see why not…?

Cause we know what elements the number of protons lead to that can be created by certain sized stars. The heavy elements are all created by exploding older bigger stars.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#15
Quote by Joshua Garcia
I wouldn't see why not…?

Hold on I just wrote the answer on my tablet when Chrome crashed. I'm gonna go punch the wall for a bit and then try again on PC.


Gozd in gora poj,
silen ženimo hrup,
uboga gmajna, le vpup, le vkup,
le vkup, le vkup z menoj,
staro pravdo v mrak tulimo,
da se pretulimo skozi to zimo
#16
Quote by Neo Evil11
Cause we know what elements the number of protons lead to that can be created by certain sized stars. The heavy elements are all created by exploding older bigger stars.


I'll quote myself here:
All we have right now are some people that are supposed to be really smart just making guesses, mostly based on guesses made by other supposedly smart people before them, and before them, etc.


Has anyone, including all those smart people said anything remotely similar to "We know all there is to know about physics and astrophysics"?
Besides people in The Pit I mean.
#17
Quote by Joshua Garcia
I wouldn't see why not…?

Because all elements beyond plutonium (94) are far too heavy and unstable to exist on any significant time scale, which is why we need to bombard insane numbers of smaller atom nuclei with other smaller nuclei for months, if not years to get a single atom of the heavier element which then gets added to the periodic table of elements.

This process is called nuclear fusion. While we can thank stars for the abundance of smaller elements we know and love like carbon and oxygen, they are actually pretty shit for nuclear fusion or rather nuclear fusion itself is pretty shit for making heavy elements, thermodynamically speaking. The heaviest element that is or can be produced by stars in significant quantities is iron (26) because it is the heaviest element which can by synthesized via nuclear fusion and still give of more energy than was required to initiate the reaction in the first place. Basically if you're trying to synthesize any element that's heavier than iron via nuclear fusion you're going to need very large amounts of energy - in the case of stars these processes are gonna occur only in very small amounts.

All heavier elements are actually created in supernovae while stars are theorized to have iron cores because the heavier elements sink to the bottom while lighter elements like hydrogen and helium float to the top. On top of that figuring out the chemical makeup of a star is actually a pretty straight-forward process because elements at these kinds of temperatures (and much lower ones, achievable in your university laboratory) give out very characteristic emission spectra which can be filtered out of the black body radiation spectra to give us a 'fingerprint' if you will.

Here is a PTE to give you a better idea of atomic mass / number.



Also, fun fact we just very recently 'completed' the seventh period of the table by producing all elements up to number 118. Because of reasons it is now in question if we'll be able to produce any heavier elements at all but work is already being done for number 120 because number 119 should be an absolute cunt to make in any case.


Gozd in gora poj,
silen ženimo hrup,
uboga gmajna, le vpup, le vkup,
le vkup, le vkup z menoj,
staro pravdo v mrak tulimo,
da se pretulimo skozi to zimo
#18
Quote by CodeMonk
I wouldn't quite say that just yet.
The universe is pretty fucking big.

All we have right now are some people that are supposed to be really smart just making guesses, mostly based on guesses made by other supposedly smart people before them, and before them, etc.

We have no clue what is really out there.

You are right.

But we most likely never see even a small fraction of it despite the public's fascination with space and time travel and the chances of finding the one exception to break the rule which could not be broken by absolutely massive events like the supernovae, in an ordinary star are not exactly in our favour.

Don't get me wrong, it could happen. But we could also find god sitting on a lawn chair on the dark side of the moon. Or we could find that the earth actually is hollow but doesn't appear that way because of crab people technology.

And yet megaprojects are not created to find out if that's the case, only shitty pseudoscience shows on the History channel. I think being ready to accept or find anything is a great aspect of the scientific method but the dreams and imagination of layman have no place in any of this.


Gozd in gora poj,
silen ženimo hrup,
uboga gmajna, le vpup, le vkup,
le vkup, le vkup z menoj,
staro pravdo v mrak tulimo,
da se pretulimo skozi to zimo
#19
Quote by JamSessionFreak
which is why we need to bombard insane numbers of smaller atom nuclei with other smaller nuclei for months, if not years to get a single atom of the heavier element which then gets added to the periodic table of elements.

And before any of you get any ideas about this, we don't get to take the single atom to some high court on a red pillow made of silk. We don't even get to measure the atom itself.

It exists for such a short period of time that it's absolutely impossible to make measurements on it, after that it decays into smaller elements which we can detect and then assume, with a certain statistical probability, that a sudden peak in the presence of those elements could only come from the decay of the bigger element we're looking for.


Gozd in gora poj,
silen ženimo hrup,
uboga gmajna, le vpup, le vkup,
le vkup, le vkup z menoj,
staro pravdo v mrak tulimo,
da se pretulimo skozi to zimo
#20
Also 'fingerprint' might have been a bad word to pick in my first post but I don't like to add edit stamps to my bigger posts.


Gozd in gora poj,
silen ženimo hrup,
uboga gmajna, le vpup, le vkup,
le vkup, le vkup z menoj,
staro pravdo v mrak tulimo,
da se pretulimo skozi to zimo
#21
Quote by JamSessionFreak
Because all elements beyond plutonium (94) are far too heavy and unstable to exist on any significant time scale,
/snip

Fun fact, Francium(atomic number 87) and Astatine(85) are so unstable that at any given time, there's likely to be less than 100g of both in the Earth's crust at any given time.
#22
Quote by JamSessionFreak
Because all elements beyond plutonium (94) are far too heavy and unstable to exist on any significant time scale, which is why we need to bombard insane numbers of smaller atom nuclei with other smaller nuclei for months, if not years to get a single atom of the heavier element which then gets added to the periodic table of elements.

This process is called nuclear fusion. While we can thank stars for the abundance of smaller elements we know and love like carbon and oxygen, they are actually pretty shit for nuclear fusion or rather nuclear fusion itself is pretty shit for making heavy elements, thermodynamically speaking. The heaviest element that is or can be produced by stars in significant quantities is iron (26) because it is the heaviest element which can by synthesized via nuclear fusion and still give of more energy than was required to initiate the reaction in the first place. Basically if you're trying to synthesize any element that's heavier than iron via nuclear fusion you're going to need very large amounts of energy - in the case of stars these processes are gonna occur only in very small amounts.

All heavier elements are actually created in supernovae while stars are theorized to have iron cores because the heavier elements sink to the bottom while lighter elements like hydrogen and helium float to the top. On top of that figuring out the chemical makeup of a star is actually a pretty straight-forward process because elements at these kinds of temperatures (and much lower ones, achievable in your university laboratory) give out very characteristic emission spectra which can be filtered out of the black body radiation spectra to give us a 'fingerprint' if you will.

Here is a PTE to give you a better idea of atomic mass / number.



Also, fun fact we just very recently 'completed' the seventh period of the table by producing all elements up to number 118. Because of reasons it is now in question if we'll be able to produce any heavier elements at all but work is already being done for number 120 because number 119 should be an absolute cunt to make in any case.

Yes, all of this yes. You just saved me so much typing and explained everything so much better than I could have.
I don't give a shit if you listen to me or not
#23
>triple posts within 10 minutes
>quotes himself in process

[img]http://i.imgur.com/LYZyCdp.gif[/img]


Quote by CrossBack7
Momie's like not even a real person, just an asian, lesbian spirit.
#24
Quote by Momentosis
>triple posts within 10 minutes
>quotes himself in process

(Invalid img)

I thought those gifs had died out
#25
Quote by slapsymcdougal at #33781796
I thought those gifs had died out


[img]http://i.imgur.com/LYZyCdp.gif[/img]


Quote by CrossBack7
Momie's like not even a real person, just an asian, lesbian spirit.
#28
Quote by slapsymcdougal at #33781800
Burn the witch!


[img]http://i.imgur.com/LYZyCdp.gif[/img]


Quote by CrossBack7
Momie's like not even a real person, just an asian, lesbian spirit.
#29
Quote by slapsymcdougal
Fun fact, Francium(atomic number 87) and Astatine(85) are so unstable that at any given time, there's likely to be less than 100g of both in the Earth's crust at any given time.

Yeah, I think there's one even lighter than those that is practically non-existant on Earth but I don't remember which one it is.

Quote by slapsymcdougal
I thought those gifs had died out

I just have him ignored, thanks for not quoting the gif.


Gozd in gora poj,
silen ženimo hrup,
uboga gmajna, le vpup, le vkup,
le vkup, le vkup z menoj,
staro pravdo v mrak tulimo,
da se pretulimo skozi to zimo
#30
Quote by CodeMonk
I wouldn't quite say that just yet.
The universe is pretty fucking big.

All we have right now are some people that are supposed to be really smart just making guesses, mostly based on guesses made by other supposedly smart people before them, and before them, etc.

We have no clue what is really out there.


That is pretty unfair to science in general. What science does is make a guess (hypothesis) and then try to tear it apart as ruthlessly as possible. Once it has been molested and beaten like the red-headed stepchild of a Catholic priest and come out as clean as the virgin Mary it becomes a scientific theory. In all their humbleness scientists call their best explanations of the universe theories. That is because science knows that it could be completely wrong at any moment. But, to then infer that science doesn't know anything because it won't take an absolute firm position (not saying you are saying that, just making a point, gimme my space GODDAMIT ) is seriously dishonest. It is almost solipsism to take the view you are taking, that science doesn't or can't know anything for sure.
I don't give a shit if you listen to me or not
#31
I'm not too concerned with being overly critical of scientific knowledge, I just hate it when

We know next to nothing and anything could be possible


turns into

Clueless basement dwellers who have seen every episode of Star Trek are able to make useful and probable predictions about the existence of alien tech on any solar system which is not completely understood


Though to be fair it's not the basement dwellers fault, we just produce horrible TV shows which focus on sci-fi rather than actual science because most people find actual science to be incredibly boring.


Gozd in gora poj,
silen ženimo hrup,
uboga gmajna, le vpup, le vkup,
le vkup, le vkup z menoj,
staro pravdo v mrak tulimo,
da se pretulimo skozi to zimo
Last edited by JamSessionFreak at Jan 17, 2016,
#32
Quote by JamSessionFreak
You are right.

But we most likely never see even a small fraction of it despite the public's fascination with space and time travel and the chances of finding the one exception to break the rule which could not be broken by absolutely massive events like the supernovae, in an ordinary star are not exactly in our favour.

Don't get me wrong, it could happen. But we could also find god sitting on a lawn chair on the dark side of the moon. Or we could find that the earth actually is hollow but doesn't appear that way because of crab people technology.

And yet megaprojects are not created to find out if that's the case, only shitty pseudoscience shows on the History channel. I think being ready to accept or find anything is a great aspect of the scientific method but the dreams and imagination of layman have no place in any of this.



Hollow Earth Theory is interesting, but how about Flat Earth Theory, Some cutting edge science stuff going on here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kFjG4jpUhQI&list=LLoSaz0B0-e7DkRl_amzrlDA&index=15
SANDBLAST YOURSELF.


Quote by i_lovemetallica
If you think Gollum was sober with his whole "Gollum/Smeagol" thing and thinking he was invisible with the ring, then you need to remove the cotton wool from your eyes.

Wake up sheeple.

Sunaj
#33
Well sheeeeeet, Jam know mad chemistry.
Well, it wasn't really what I believe so much as it was a random spitball of an idea. Good to know though.



I really should study this stuff more.
#34
Quote by Kevin Saale
That is pretty unfair to science in general. What science does is make a guess (hypothesis) and then try to tear it apart as ruthlessly as possible. Once it has been molested and beaten like the red-headed stepchild of a Catholic priest and come out as clean as the virgin Mary it becomes a scientific theory. In all their humbleness scientists call their best explanations of the universe theories. That is because science knows that it could be completely wrong at any moment. But, to then infer that science doesn't know anything because it won't take an absolute firm position (not saying you are saying that, just making a point, gimme my space GODDAMIT ) is seriously dishonest. It is almost solipsism to take the view you are taking, that science doesn't or can't know anything for sure.

Most of what I used to watch on TV was the valid Science channels.
So I am aware of the scientific method.

There is a shitload of things the scientific community can know with damn near 100% certainty when they can study them in the comfort of some labs, but when they are studying things that are thousands, hundreds of thousands of light years away or more, its till just a guess.
But lets say, they discover a hydrogen cloud 1,000 light years out.
How can they be sure that there isn't something unknown to us between here and there skewing their observations?

More what I am trying to say, as I said before is, the universe a pretty damn big.
How the hell could we ever possibly know all the shit that is out there.
And how do we know that our knowledge of physics is complete (my bet is that it probably isn't).

Something I read in some other post, probably on another forum, and maybe not the best analogy, but something to think about....

Take a boat out on the ocean, scope out a bucket of water
There are no fish in the bucket so you assume that there are no fish in the ocean.

That's kind of like observing what little we are able to observe and assume that that's the way it is everywhere.

And no, I wasn't inferring that.
Its just that our sample size is to small IMO, to make judgements about such a large area can possibly be way off base.
Last edited by CodeMonk at Jan 17, 2016,
#35
This is why we need increased science literacy

longing rusted furnace daybreak seventeen benign nine homecoming one freight car
#36
I get what monk is saying too though.

With such an infinite universe, the variables can never be measured to its fullest.
#37
The variables will all obey the laws of physics as we know it. Many variables that will exist in a framework.

longing rusted furnace daybreak seventeen benign nine homecoming one freight car
#38
Quote by Joshua Garcia
I get what monk is saying too though.

With such an infinite universe, the variables can never be measured to its fullest.

This guy gets it.

Quote by EndTheRapture51
The variables will all obey the laws of physics as we know it. Many variables that will exist in a framework.

Key words there one of the things I am trying to say.
Last edited by CodeMonk at Jan 17, 2016,
#39
Quote by CodeMonk
Most of what I used to watch on TV was the valid Science channels.
So I am aware of the scientific method.

There is a shitload of things the scientific community can know with damn near 100% certainty when they can study them in the comfort of some labs, but when they are studying things that are thousands, hundreds of thousands of light years away or more, its till just a guess.
But lets say, they discover a hydrogen cloud 1,000 light years out.
How can they be sure that there isn't something unknown to us between here and there skewing their observations?

More what I am trying to say, as I said before is, the universe a pretty damn big.
How the hell could we ever possibly know all the shit that is out there.
And how do we know that our knowledge of physics is complete (my bet is that it probably isn't).

Something I read in some other post, probably on another forum, and maybe not the best analogy, but something to think about....

Take a boat out on the ocean, scope out a bucket of water
There are no fish in the bucket so you assume that there are no fish in the ocean.

That's kind of like observing what little we are able to observe and assume that that's the way it is everywhere.


Eh, the bucket idea doesn't really hold water. ( couldn't resist that one). Science is more like taking a million gallon tank out of the ocean in multiple spots, having independent groups do the same, observing what you find and then using reasonable expectation to conclude to that most of the other unobserved spots are most probably similar to what has already been found.

I guess the main thing I was objecting to in your original post was the idea that we would find more elements out there. If there was some other naturally occurring element out there that wasn't already discovered that would not only alter the world view of the entire planet, but it would drastically change everything we know about chemistry, physics, the make up of atoms and all fields related.
I don't give a shit if you listen to me or not
#40
Quote by CodeMonk

Key words there one of the things I am trying to say.


That's the only way we can think about these things though. We can't just say "What if the star is made of fluorescent jelly xD " so you have to consider it and do the maths using the rules we have already.

longing rusted furnace daybreak seventeen benign nine homecoming one freight car
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