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#1
Ok, so go easy on me..

Ive wanted to learn guitar for years.. Im 40 now, but due "life" getting in the way it never happened. I taught myself zome theory yests ago (see my join date).

Anyway. Im going to stsrt. I found a, teacher near me and my first lesson is Tuesday. He ssked what my gosls are, which are to be able ro plsy my favorite rock/metal song for tje enjoyment and love of music.

He asked what, if anything i know. I explained what music theory i know, what i need further help with, etc.

I borrowed a, freinds acoustic guitar years ago and tsught myself a, few, chords, and mary had a, little lamb.

My question, being its, my first lessons... What should i expect the first lesson, and first few weeks, and months.

I do want to learn tje theory, but also have some fun too.

Well be meeting once a week.

Thanks
Last edited by cam75 at Jan 24, 2016,
#2
I've never taken lessons but having learned to play the guitar I have an idea of what I would hope to expect.

First off (you probably already know) the teacher will show you things but the real learning is done in the practicing on your own.

With that in mind I would hope that in my first lesson the teacher would go over the big picture plan and identify some realistic goals over the first six weeks and twelve weeks.

Then being my first session I would expect him to take me through a practice session showing me some fun stuff to practice for the first week. In the next couple of weeks I would expect some more specific, and structured practice structures to be put in place to develop a well rounded practice routine that is going to be challenging but also rewarding.

After that it would be a matter of monitoring progress, observing and correcting flaws, and introducing new challenging songs, techniques, and drills as I advance to keep me on track and headed toward my goals.

Also motivation, positivity, and encouragement.

But that's from a guy that has never had lessons so
Si
#3
Quote by cam75
Ok, so go easy on me..

Ive wanted to learn guitar for years.. Im 40 now, but due "life" getting in the way it never happened. I taught myself zome theory yests ago (see my join date).

Anyway. Im going to stsrt. I found a, teacher near me and my first lesson is Tuesday. He ssked what my gosls are, which are to be able ro plsy my favorite rock/metal song for tje enjoyment and love of music.

He asked what, if anything i know. I explained what music theory i know, what i need further help with, etc.

I borrowed a, freinds acoustic guitar years ago and tsught myself a, few, chords, and mary had a, little lamb.

My question, being its, my first lessons... What should i expect the first lesson, and first few weeks, and months.

I do want to learn tje theory, but also have some fun too.

Well be meeting once a week.

Thanks
He should check how you hold the guitar, point out any potential bad habits you could develop.
He should ask you to strum the chords you know, to check your sound and your sense of time.
He might ask you to play any riffs or songs you know (as much as you can).

These kind of things will help him know where to start, and (along with your goals) to plan further lessons.

He might ask about that theory you know, and might correct a few things, but with theory always make sure you really understand anything he tells you and get him to demonstrate. Theory is pointless unless you know how it all sounds, and - even better - what songs it applies to.

He should give you something to work on before the next lesson - and then, at that lesson, check up on how you get on.

There may be times when you find him showing or telling you something that you can't connect with the goals you want to pursue. Some (bad) teachers like to follow their own agenda. He's the pro, but you're the client! Always ask whenever you're not sure about anything, or what the point of a particular exercise is (he should tell you that anyway). He should be happy to go over anything as many times as you need in order to understand it.

My tip is never leave a lesson (a) confused about anything, or (b) without something to practise for next time.
#4
Thank you for the answers

Weve already discussed a portion of this via email, so he could prepare my lesson. From the sound of it he is on the ball.

Cant wait to start on tuesday. I defienetly know I am the client, and will speak my mind regarding what I want out of it. Looking forward to bouncing questions off of him, and having someone physically show me something.

Theres only so much I can learn off reading an youtube without any personal interaction.
#5
Make sure it is your leisure time for the week. That lessons are an enjoyable thing you look forward to rather than dreading.

There is also no magical pill. Time, patience, persistence is key. The best thing you can do is show up regardless of how much playing you got done for the week. Some weeks you will get more playing time at home, others none! Consistently show up regardless.

Check out this article to get an understanding of the things you will learn to become a guitarist that can confidently give any songs a go at http://www.essm.net.au/how-to-learn-guitar/
Visit my music school site for advice on gear, music theory and lessons.
www.essm.net.au
#6
Hey good luck with your teacher! All teachers are going to be different so it's hard to say what to expect. Hopefully it will be from a person that you sort of click with. If you can have fun at the lessons it might help you stay motivated.
"In the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years."-Abraham Lincoln
#7
Also remember you may do most of your learning between lessons, as you practise what he's given you and you get you head (and ears and hands) around it.

"I forgot everything I was taught. I only remember what I learned."
#8
Thanks,

Im on the right track then.

Ive been practing some basic chords today, lesson is in a few hours.

Cant wait, cause I just cant get comfortable fret hand wise. To be able to fret the low strings it seem I have to contort my arm, and my back and neck are tight from being sort of hunched over.

Props to the self taught people, I think Im gonna have a tough time with a teacher.

Again. Thanks for all the insight.

Back to lurking.
#9
Quote by cam75

Cant wait, cause I just cant get comfortable fret hand wise. To be able to fret the low strings it seem I have to contort my arm, and my back and neck are tight from being sort of hunched over.
There you go. That has to be the first thing he addresses - your arm and body position - or maybe did address, if you've already had the lesson by now!
#11
Quote by Rhys Lett ESSM
Check out this article I did about common problems I see in beginner guitarists at http://www.essm.net.au/play-guitar/


Playing guitar is all to do with your thumb and wrist placement I believe!


Sometimes I feel like you're only here to advertise your site, Rhys There are some useful tips there, though.

Quote by jongtr
There you go. That has to be the first thing he addresses - your arm and body position - or maybe did address, if you've already had the lesson by now!


It was the first thing my first teacher fixed for me. I tried to do palm mutes with my picking hand placed above the neck pickup
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#12
He did help me with my body position, and my strumming, which sucked. Holding pick to tight. I made my first chord progression (Em to Am). Taught me some warm ups and fretting exercises. Showed me a few power chords. Taught me how to utilize a metronome in my practice.

All in all, i enjoyed my first lesson, and I actually felt I made progess in the hour.


Thanks for the links, Ill chech them out.
#13
I apologize if this is a later post than what should have been posted before, but my first lessons ever were pretty decent. It gave me the inspiration and desire and want to learn more about guitar, bass, keyboards/vocals, music, etc. One should NOT expect to be able to learn everything that very first time, though. I can't tell ya how many of my former students (tutor in music and all) expected me to teach them all the advanced and technical stuff when they've NEVER held a guitar before even. With time and practice spent, and even planning and effort, one will eventually get to the later stuff. Just don't be put off if you can't learn many things right off the bat. Hope this helps
#14
It's hard to say what you should epect. All teachers are different, and some use a book that you buy and start you on page 1 that day, so you do that.

Others like myself dont use books at all, but we dig into what's most meaningful to you and your goals, and then start teaching you some skill sets, techniques, exercises (also those may be different).

Being 40, no one's going to come down on you, I'm 47 - many here are over 30. 95% of my online students are over the age of 30. Never too late my friend.

But, I have a bit of advice. Keep this thread open, and post like a running journal of what they are teaching you, each week, and that way we could help assure you if they are teaching you well or if it is haphazard and random or if there are any red flags.

I'd advise keep both eyes wide open, listen to your gut, but keep an open mind and give something at least a month and then evaluate it as a whole. Starting from zero takes time, and it's no ones fault, its just familiarity with the instrument, and your hands responding to the point of being comfortably in muscle memory with a change or a strum, etc. Realistically, expect to give it time.

We can chime in and opine on the actual direction of the lessons if you post a chronicle of the lessons as they come.

Best,

Sean

Quote by cam75
Ok, so go easy on me..

Ive wanted to learn guitar for years.. Im 40 now, but due "life" getting in the way it never happened. I taught myself zome theory yests ago (see my join date).

Anyway. Im going to stsrt. I found a, teacher near me and my first lesson is Tuesday. He ssked what my gosls are, which are to be able ro plsy my favorite rock/metal song for tje enjoyment and love of music.

He asked what, if anything i know. I explained what music theory i know, what i need further help with, etc.

I borrowed a, freinds acoustic guitar years ago and tsught myself a, few, chords, and mary had a, little lamb.

My question, being its, my first lessons... What should i expect the first lesson, and first few weeks, and months.

I do want to learn tje theory, but also have some fun too.

Well be meeting once a week.

Thanks
#15
Sean,

Awesome advice. I updated the thread title. Ill keep a log of my lessons, and add a new post each week. Next lesson Tuesday.

Would appreciate any advice on where lessons should head.

My teacher doesnt use a book, taylors lessons to each student.
#16
Very interesting on that. Lot of teachers are starting to do that now, though. Did the teacher say at all what he would try to start teaching you, by any chance?
#18
Quote by Kevätuhri
Sometimes I feel like you're only here to advertise your site, Rhys There are some useful tips there, though.


Just a quick and easy way to give answers, also easier with photos there as well. On this thread tho certain seems like I am shilling away our site!!
Visit my music school site for advice on gear, music theory and lessons.
www.essm.net.au
#20
Quote by cam75
He did help me with my body position, and my strumming, which sucked. Holding pick to tight. I made my first chord progression (Em to Am). Taught me some warm ups and fretting exercises. Showed me a few power chords. Taught me how to utilize a metronome in my practice.

All in all, i enjoyed my first lesson, and I actually felt I made progess in the hour.


Thanks for the links, Ill chech them out.


Seems like a lot, to be honest. I'm having some question as to how you can achieve any substantial progress with all those topics in just one hour, much less the first lesson.

I'm for correcting your body position, giving you some rudimentary instruction on strumming (not picking...I'd wait on that..let you work on one core element, rather than dividing your time) I don't see that Em to Am is a good first progression, simply because there's no common transition...is there a song connected to this, or is it an abstract exercise? There are better first chords, and a great first song, and it facilitates not only playing and fretting both chords, but also the changing of them, making songs more available.

I wouldn't show you power chords, until I was applying them to a song I was teaching you - for example Iron Man, or SOTW, etc.

I'm good with warm ups. My impression of your first lesson's content, as a full time guitar instructor, and this is entirely subjective, and by no means is it absolute, or correct...is that it's a potpourri of things without any apparent organization to it.

I don't think you can teach someone to practice with a metronome in one lesson. I wouldn't even try it. I'd divide it out over some weeks, in class with hands on teaching and demonstrating and having them play along with me by learning through imitation what being on time sounds and feels like.

Its challenging enough having someone count slowly to 4 the first time they are exposed to musical time keeping, much less feel and sync to an unforgiving click. Teaching metronome skills is a pretty involved process, and can take months before someone is comfortably on their own doing so.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jan 27, 2016,
#21
Hi Sean,


Thanks for the critque. I agree now in retrospect is was alot. Ill admit the metronome was a bit much, and I have ditched that for now. Ive been practicing about an hour a day. I can play the "8" basic chords, pretty well right now, although still having some trouble with G.

Clarification, he wasnt teaching me power chords per say. We were talking music during the lesson, and just showed me a fingering of them in one position, but it wasnt something I was to be working on.


So, yesterday was Tuesday, my lesson day.

First the good news. Im loving the guitar, playing, the music theory. My fretting and strumming have really progressed in a week.

The bad news. My teacher was a no show yesterday. He teaches out of his house, which is fine by me. I showed up 5 minutes early for my lesson. No one home. Called his cell, voicemail. So lost hour for me. He left me a voice mail a few hours later (almost 7pm) while I was in my night class).

Im pretty pissed about that. I work 20-25 a week, and am taking 17 credits this semester trying to get my schooling for my career change done fast. I have wife/kids...family time commitments, so my time is valuable. I dont have a lot of hours to waste.

So, Im changing teachers. Second lesson and he no shows? He had my cell and email, all I needed was a quick message saying he needed to reschedule.

So, anyway. I have found a new teacher with quite a few glowing reviews, but he's a good 30 minute drive away from me, but im commited.

So Ill update next week with my new teacher.

In the meantime Groupon had a deal for one month of Jamplay for $5, so Ive been watching lessons there, and reviewing UG's lessons.
#22
Quote by cam75
Hi Sean,


Thanks for the critque. I agree now in retrospect is was alot. Ill admit the metronome was a bit much, and I have ditched that for now. Ive been practicing about an hour a day. I can play the "8" basic chords, pretty well right now, although still having some trouble with G.

Clarification, he wasnt teaching me power chords per say. We were talking music during the lesson, and just showed me a fingering of them in one position, but it wasnt something I was to be working on.


So, yesterday was Tuesday, my lesson day.

First the good news. Im loving the guitar, playing, the music theory. My fretting and strumming have really progressed in a week.

The bad news. My teacher was a no show yesterday. He teaches out of his house, which is fine by me. I showed up 5 minutes early for my lesson. No one home. Called his cell, voicemail. So lost hour for me. He left me a voice mail a few hours later (almost 7pm) while I was in my night class).

Im pretty pissed about that. I work 20-25 a week, and am taking 17 credits this semester trying to get my schooling for my career change done fast. I have wife/kids...family time commitments, so my time is valuable. I dont have a lot of hours to waste.

So, Im changing teachers. Second lesson and he no shows? He had my cell and email, all I needed was a quick message saying he needed to reschedule.

So, anyway. I have found a new teacher with quite a few glowing reviews, but he's a good 30 minute drive away from me, but im commited.

So Ill update next week with my new teacher.

In the meantime Groupon had a deal for one month of Jamplay for $5, so Ive been watching lessons there, and reviewing UG's lessons.


Hey cam,

Sorry to hear of your experience with the no show teacher. That's not a good start at all. I agree with your decision.

I hate seeing things like this. All you're trying to do is learn to play. Shouldnt be that difficult, but sometimes it is. It sucks.

By the way I do offer free mentoring. I'd be happy to help where I can, make recommendations and the like. Years ago I checked out Jam Play, and to be honest is was pretty good for what it was. I would not recommend a site like Guitar Tricks however. JP was one of the best - keep in mind this was a good 6-7 years ago when I had a free pass, and I used it to make a review at that time.

Keep posting here, and I'll be following your progress with your new teacher, with great interest. Too bad you aren't close by, I'd have been happy to take you under my wing...

Best,

Sean
#23
Sean,

Thanks for the mentoring offer, and ill take you up on that. Ive always got questions, but dont feel like being flamed for asking 'noob" questions. And with lessons and learning the guitar it seems there are many approaches to take with a beginning player.

Id love to bounce ideas and questions around, and especially like advice on my learning track, as in what should I be learning next, or what doesnt need to be taught, or hit on prevalently with someone as me who is doing this for the enjoyment, and not as a career, or playing in a band.

Im enjoying Jamplay, and watched up to learning all the "major chords", as the instructor put it, 14 or them. Do I have them mastered, no way, but I can some of them, just not the barre chords yet. I dont have the fingered strength yet.

I may keep it as a supplement to my live instructions.

Let me pose this question. What would you start me on If I was coming to you for a first lesson?

First off, Im learning guitar due to my passion for music. I want to play my favorite bands for fun.
I WANT to know the Music Theory, it intrigues me. I have been studying MT from the net and have a pretty good grasp on the basics, intervals, circle of 5ths, etc.

As I said earlier I can fret and play A,Am,C,D,Dm,E,Em,G, and have been practicing the "spider" exercise up the strings with different finger combinations up the fretboard. Just starting to try a few chord progressions, there not clean or fast. I only started "playing" (if you can call it that" about 2 weeks ago.

I can get about an hour to 90 minutes of practice in per day, usually.

So what kind of lessons plan would be a good start over the next month of two? What should I look for, or ask to be taught? What should I look out for that shouldnt be taught?, so If if wants to include it, I might want to speak up and have him rethink that part of the plan.

Thanks again. Really appreciate it.

FYI, still dont have callouses built up yet, played so much yesterday and today my fingers are sore, but Ill be back at it tomorrow.

EDIT:

I read your profile page regarding mentoring. If I do ask something that is only for a paying student just let me know. If I asked I probably wasnt aware that was crossing the line.
Last edited by cam75 at Jan 28, 2016,
#24
Cam, I know I'm not Sean, but I second everything he has stated so far. I feel bad that a fellow teacher did not show up at all. That is a shame. Hell, my students would sorely be disappointed if I didn't show up to teach them. I'D demand a refund from me in that case Mang, you can ask any questions you want. We've all been noobish at one point or another...others still continuing the trend. To me, the best teachers are the ones that can learn new things along with their students. If my students have new techniques that I myself can learn and better with others as well, I turn into the student that time. Callous build-up may not happen much even when playing a lot. Some have incredibly sturdy and resistant fingers. Personally, I don't know it if sounds like a lot, but I usually get in about an hour to two to three every chance I get for practice. Granted, I am nowhere near as busy as you are, but...it works. You sound like you know quite a great deal already, so a continuation of what you know, plus new stuff, balanced out would work marvelously, I think. Hope you have the best of luck with your future endeavors.

Sharky
#25
Quote by cam75
The bad news. My teacher was a no show yesterday. He teaches out of his house, which is fine by me. I showed up 5 minutes early for my lesson. No one home. Called his cell, voicemail. So lost hour for me. He left me a voice mail a few hours later (almost 7pm) while I was in my night class).


Wow. That absolutely sucks. I can understand the need to reschedule if he is teaching out of his house and all but not letting you know, that's lame. Did you pay him in advance?

Best of luck with the new teacher. I think it's worth it to find a good mentor, just don't get discouraged by stuff like this.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#26
Thanks for the insight Cherokee, and no i did not pay in advance. I mailed a check for the initial lesson.
#28
It was $20. Id rather just let it go and move on, after all I did have the first lesson, and did enjoy it. I owe it, so ill pay it.
#29
Fair enough. Keep up the good work with trying the newer stuff out, though. Let us know if we can still help ya with things ^^
#30
If it was me, I'd spend my first lesson watching you play, and then showing you some basics of theory, and then it depends where you're at, and what music you want to play, but we'd be en route to learning your first song, and some about theory associated with it, if improvisation is something you'd be interested in. If you weren't interested in that really, I probably wouldn't bother with scales too much. But I'd make sure you know what they are, what they are for, how they are used, and what learning them entails, and if you were interested in that, then I would show you how to train those.

Your teacher seems to have informed themselves about you, which I think is a good sign, and is very important, but imo, there is a lot of information which makes a big difference that can only come from watching you play.

It sounds like you have some experience on guitar already, but improvement of dexterity will be a bit slower for you, that for someone younger. So that's another reason why I might not get into scales with you right away, unless you already have a good grasp of a lot of chord shapes.
#31
Learning the guitar comes in two separate approaches, learning the technique of actually playing the instrument, and secondly learning how to think like a guitarist/musician. It shouldn't take too long, if you can afford lessons, from a good teacher, and , you have a good taste in music/music culture.
#33
Quote by cam75
Sean,

Thanks for the mentoring offer, and ill take you up on that. Ive always got questions, but dont feel like being flamed for asking 'noob" questions. And with lessons and learning the guitar it seems there are many approaches to take with a beginning player.

Id love to bounce ideas and questions around, and especially like advice on my learning track, as in what should I be learning next, or what doesnt need to be taught, or hit on prevalently with someone as me who is doing this for the enjoyment, and not as a career, or playing in a band.

Im enjoying Jamplay, and watched up to learning all the "major chords", as the instructor put it, 14 or them. Do I have them mastered, no way, but I can some of them, just not the barre chords yet. I dont have the fingered strength yet.

I may keep it as a supplement to my live instructions.

Let me pose this question. What would you start me on If I was coming to you for a first lesson?

First off, Im learning guitar due to my passion for music. I want to play my favorite bands for fun.
I WANT to know the Music Theory, it intrigues me. I have been studying MT from the net and have a pretty good grasp on the basics, intervals, circle of 5ths, etc.

As I said earlier I can fret and play A,Am,C,D,Dm,E,Em,G, and have been practicing the "spider" exercise up the strings with different finger combinations up the fretboard. Just starting to try a few chord progressions, there not clean or fast. I only started "playing" (if you can call it that" about 2 weeks ago.

I can get about an hour to 90 minutes of practice in per day, usually.

So what kind of lessons plan would be a good start over the next month of two? What should I look for, or ask to be taught? What should I look out for that shouldnt be taught?, so If if wants to include it, I might want to speak up and have him rethink that part of the plan.

Thanks again. Really appreciate it.

FYI, still dont have callouses built up yet, played so much yesterday and today my fingers are sore, but Ill be back at it tomorrow.

EDIT:

I read your profile page regarding mentoring. If I do ask something that is only for a paying student just let me know. If I asked I probably wasnt aware that was crossing the line.


Hey cam,

You're good brother, no one's gonna flame you, if they do, I'll flame em back. No but seriously, this place is full of great people that I know and respect and we are pretty good at self policing things here. I'm proud of that. Post away, my friend.

I'm not worried about you crossing the line with mentoring. It's my job to guide you, and the questions that you have are certainly in scope of mentoring. Do not even sweat it my friend. I got your back. I love to help others. That's why I'm here.

Best,

Sean
#34
Cool.. Been busy with work and school..

Right hand, position question... Seems lots of thoughts on this.. Float? Anchor with pinky? Anchor wrist on bridge? I cant find a comfortable positilns with good picking accuracy...

From youtube videos it seems most better plsyers rest wrist arounf bridge.

My fingers.. Its comfortable to keep all my fingers in a ball..like im gooing to punch.. Yet most on YouTube have fingers 2,3,4 flared, but when i do rhis i hit the strings with my fingers.. Incorrect pick position?


https://youtu.be/zxKIkf8ORCI

Thdresca link to a video of the position im referencing
#35
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hyPHeFLFHvc

This feels comfortable to me. Ive been trying this, but Im having trouble with the Low E and A strings, seems I have to contort my wrist, or move my shoulder so much in order to not muffle/mute the strings, plus I lose the stability.

Am I doing something wrong? or just need more practice?
#36
You've been playing guitar for 2 months, am I reading that right, Cam?

14 chords? No, I wouldnt. I'd start out and teach you two, and proceed all the way up to what I consider the Big 9...as a beginner. And instead of chords as chords, they'd have songs, so you get technical practice, build a song repertoire (when someone says...can you play any songs, you'd say, yes)

For clarity sake, these are the chords I teach and call the Big 9, and I teach them in a very specific order...(which is not shown below).

A, Am, B11, C, D, Dm, E, Em, F and G

I wouldn't worry about how to hold the pick as far as anchoring it, not at all. In my opinion, it's too early. That kind of thing can be looked at in/over time. And I absolutely would not recommend theory at this point for you.

I am chewing on your points a bit, as I usually do before I make my recommendations. But I'm absolutely confident we can get you there.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Jan 31, 2016,
#37
I second the Big 9 concept. I question myself: is B11 what I think I remember it to be?

Yeah, pick placement is not too big of a concern, Cam. Let that occur later in time, if you can. Theory comes and goes, so Sean is correct on pretty much everything stated so far

-Sharky
#38
Ive been studying theory on and off. Im actually pretty comfortable with theory basics. Ive been actually physically touching the guitar about a month. I average 1 hour of time a day.

I can most the big 8, but still have trouble with G, oh, and A, having trouble barreing it, or getting my 3 fingers squeezed in on the fretboard.

Been doing the spider exercises and practing my chords, and some chord changes.

Proabaly overthinking the anchoring and pick thing then.

Just my nature, when I start something, I want to master it, and I go all in. Ill try to reign it in some.

Really appreciate all the help and insight from everyone.
Last edited by cam75 at Jan 31, 2016,
#40
as far as the anchoring thing - I had lessons for maybe 8 months when I first started. My teacher at the time told me to try anchoring with my pinky and I did and developed a habit. A year or two in when I started working on speed I learned that it's a bad habit and that I could really develop better speed and have less tension if I didn't anchor my pinky. I was fairly pissed off that I had been taught to do that and couldn't believe he'd given me a bad habit. Now looking back on it it didn't matter and probably sped the process along. I got to the point where it became a problem to be corrected and at that point I had the ability to do so, while if I'd started that way it may have slowed down the learning process, so in the long run it may have been a good thing.

So, for anchoring or not I agree that you shouldn't worry about it right now, just do whatever is most comfortable and makes it easier to play and then later you can fix it if you need to.

The way I play now I don't really anchor, but I do so much muting that my palm and fingers are almost always in contact with whatever strings I don't want to be ringing at that particular moment. When playing parts where everything should be ringing out I float.
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