#1
Hi there,

I've been playing guitar for around 4 years but I have noticed very little progression in the past couple of years and this year I want to start progressing further as a musician and player. I have set a couple of goals that I want to achieve

I want to be able to jam comfortably with other players so I would need a good level of theory

I also want to be able to play tremonti and alter bridge songs well so I think my technical ability would need improvement

Apart from this, can you guys recommend how else I can improve my playing and reach these goals?

Thanks
#2
You learn to jam by jamming with other people. Do you ever play with other people? If not, join a band or just find some friends to play with. Also, learn songs by ear. You need a good ear to be able to jam with others. Because jamming is all about a "musical conversation" - you need to listen to others and react to their playing. That's what a good jam is about.

What may help with your technique is taking guitar lessons.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Jan 17, 2016,
#3
What is your current set of skills? What do you know about notes (scales come under this category), power chords, open chords, barre chords and jazz chords? These are the 5 things we do as guitarists technique wise.

Like MaggaraMarine mentioned playing with other musicians to also build your playing.
Visit my music school site for advice on gear, music theory and lessons.
www.essm.net.au
#4
Everything mentioned so far. Most musicians will have moments or even years of lack of progress in music, but then suddenly reinvent themselves through some means. Whether that means actually going to lessons, looking them up, doing covers, doing own songs, playing with others, playing by one's self, any gear, no gear at all, practice or lack thereof, or even knowhow of terms and techniques, the sky's not the limit for ya. Best of luck with it all
#5
Quote by MaggaraMarine
You learn to jam by jamming with other people. Do you ever play with other people? If not, join a band or just find some friends to play with. Also, learn songs by ear. You need a good ear to be able to jam with others. Because jamming is all about a "musical conversation" - you need to listen to others and react to their playing. That's what a good jam is about.

What may help with your technique is taking guitar lessons.


+1 (especially developing ear)
#6
Echoing what has previously been said, I think you will need to find other people so you can play together. In my opinion, jamming comfortably has little to do with theory, but more to do with experience. The more you play together with other musicians, the more "feel" you have when playing music. Learning theory is important too, yes, just don't let it limit you in expressing yourself through music. For guitar techniques, I guess you can start by investing your time learning through videos, because there are tons of it in the internet. If you haven't covered the basic techniques yet, you might as well start learning them now. Also, if you can afford taking guitar lessons and have the time to do so, I say you do just that.

Anyway, cheers!
#7
Quote by ReiReiN
Echoing what has previously been said, I think you will need to find other people so you can play together. In my opinion, jamming comfortably has little to do with theory, but more to do with experience. The more you play together with other musicians, the more "feel" you have when playing music.

Yeah, jamming is about having a musical conversation. You need to learn to listen to other musicians.

Learning theory is important too, yes, just don't let it limit you in expressing yourself through music.

If you learn it correctly, it won't limit you. Quite the opposite actually. It can help you if you are stuck and makes learning new stuff a lot easier. It makes analyzing what you hear a lot easier. Just don't treat theory as "rules". Theory just explains sounds and it can explain anything that happens in music.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#8
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Theory just explains sounds and it can explain anything that happens in music.
I wouldn't say it does even that, but then I guess it depends what you mean by "explain".

Essentially, theory describes what's happening in music, using a dedicated system of terminology to label the various sounds and the common ways in which the sounds are put together. Theory is about "common practices".

What theory doesn't do is explain why musicians do this or that. It doesn't explain "why" something "works". It just takes account of what does work (in the opinion of most musicians, over time), and invents names for it; to allow musicians to talk (and write) about it, and to making teaching and learning easier.

Of course, you're right about how useful it is: as an analytical tool, as well as a communication system among musicians. And also a fund of ideas (an introduction to other sounds) to try that one might not have thought of.... But not "laws" to be followed.
Last edited by jongtr at Jan 23, 2016,
#9
Quote by alexriffs
Hi there,

I've been playing guitar for around 4 years but I have noticed very little progression in the past couple of years and this year I want to start progressing further as a musician and player. I have set a couple of goals that I want to achieve

I want to be able to jam comfortably with other players so I would need a good level of theory

I also want to be able to play tremonti and alter bridge songs well so I think my technical ability would need improvement

Apart from this, can you guys recommend how else I can improve my playing and reach these goals?

Thanks



How have you learned to play up to this point?

What would you say are the good and bad points of that approach to this point?

Is there anything that's made that approach not as useful now?

I think its an excellent step that you have actually defined and listed your personal goals and places for growth.

Once I get a better overview of these answers I feel I might be able to better give you some advice.

Best,

Sean
#10
Quote by alexriffs
Hi there,

I've been playing guitar for around 4 years but I have noticed very little progression in the past couple of years and this year I want to start progressing further as a musician and player. I have set a couple of goals that I want to achieve

I want to be able to jam comfortably with other players so I would need a good level of theory

I also want to be able to play tremonti and alter bridge songs well so I think my technical ability would need improvement

Apart from this, can you guys recommend how else I can improve my playing and reach these goals?

Thanks



You don't need a good level of theory to jam comfortable - though it does help - what you need is experience. Start simple. Have a friend play a progression in say, A minor and play notes from the A minor or A minor pentatonic scale. Then change - you play a progression or riff while he solos.

Once you'll get used to it you'll find it's easier than it seems.

It's important that you listen to what the other is doing.