#1
I've heard about adjusting the action on the internet, but I have no idea how to. I have an Ibanez RG series (RG6003FM). Thanks.
#3
Adjusting the action on those types of bridges is simple. It looks like the standard strat-type fixed bridge with 2 grub screws per saddle.

All you need to do is adjust the 2 grub screws per saddle with an allen wrench that's the appropriate size (it'll be a very small one) by the same amount as each other so that the saddle doesn't sit crooked. And then subsequently adjusting all the other string saddles by the same amount that you adjusted the first saddle, so you don't end up throwing the string radius out of whack.

It's easier to show this with a picture than to describe it, but the string radius refers to the way all the strings's action heights are set relative to the guitar's fretboard radius. You want each string to follow the path of the fretboard radius, and by adjusting the action of 1 string, you must adjust all the other strings by the same amount so the relative action of each string still matches that of the fretboard's curvature.

Like this:



Notice how the action of each string is adjusted to the fretboard radius. This is important to ensure that each string is at the optimum height for the best playability possible.

If you forgot how much you adjusted the action of one saddle, so you cannot accurately adjust the others to match, the only solution is to buy an understring fretboard radius gauge. They come in sets of several, that are suited to the fretboard radii of most guitars. They look like this:



You can buy them here:

http://www.stewmac.com/Luthier_Tools/Tools_by_Job/Tools_for_Necks_and_Fingerboards/Understring_Radius_Gauges.html

Although Stewmac is a ripoff merchant. You can buy gauges that are just as good for a lot less on Amazon.
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#4
One thing to watch out for
I always slacken off the strings a little so there is less tension on the guitar, making the grub screws easier to adjust. I started doing this after I stripped the head of a screw while adjusting the action.
^ Probably a load of crap

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#7
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
And then subsequently adjusting all the other string saddles by the same amount that you adjusted the first saddle, so you don't end up throwing the string radius out of whack.

It's easier to show this with a picture than to describe it, but the string radius refers to the way all the strings's action heights are set relative to the guitar's fretboard radius. You want each string to follow the path of the fretboard radius, and by adjusting the action of 1 string, you must adjust all the other strings by the same amount so the relative action of each string still matches that of the fretboard's curvature.

Like this:

Notice how the action of each string is adjusted to the fretboard radius. This is important to ensure that each string is at the optimum height for the best playability possible.

If you forgot how much you adjusted the action of one saddle, so you cannot accurately adjust the others to match, the only solution is to buy an understring fretboard radius gauge. They come in sets of several, that are suited to the fretboard radii of most guitars. They look like this:

I imagine this applies less to flatter fretboards, but personally I find that matching the fretboard radius isn't necessarily the best option; on 9.5" boards I tend to have the string radius a fair bit flatter to allow for bending without fretting out. An Ibby fretboard is probably the next best thing to flat anyway though.
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