#1
I get the impression from various magazine stories and things of that nature that the general consensus is that the LP is a better guitar than the SG. My first guitar ever was an SG and I have never found another I liked better. In what way is the LP better or are they in fact very similar to each other in terms of tone and versatility.
#2
different is different. i own two of each.
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#3
Quote by trashedlostfdup
different is different. i own two of each.

+1

My favourite depends on my mood that day.
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#5
The studio is made from many bits of mahogany (ie what they have left lying around in the factory), the sg standard is made from 2 bits.
Not sure if this makes much difference to the sound though.
#6
I'd say the SG and the LP Studio are quite different. The maple cap on the LP body is the main reason for this as it makes the body denser and heavier so the tone is different. I personally prefer SGs to Les Pauls, but it's down to personal taste.
#7
I've always felt there was a big difference in the way they felt and played.

The LP has a big thick body that contributes to a clunky neck heel and attaches to the body at the 16th fret. That makes upper fret access less than comfortable. That thick, dense, compact body, however, is what contributes to the sound and sustain of the guitar. Because the neck is tilted back relative to the body, your left arm isn't as stretched out to reach the first fret as it would be if the guitar didn't have that tiltback. And, of course, the design of the headstock leads to it being especially vulnerable to breakage; on many LPs, the tip of the headstock is actually behind the plane of the back of the guitar, which means that a guitar laying on a table or on the floor is actually supported by the most vulnerable part of the guitar.

The SG tends toward being neck heavy (some are blatantly so), and when that happens, you find yourself supporting the neck with your fretting hand, and and that's not a great way to play. This is especially true since the design of the SG pushes everything over to your left (as the guitar hangs in the strap or sits on your knee). If you have your arms hanging down by your sides and bring your hands up at a 90 angle, you'll naturally come to a much different spot on the neck (and the body) than you would on an LP. Because the body on an SG is so thin compared to the thickness of the neck, there's very little neck heel. Beyond that, the body connects at about the 19th fret,so you have generally more comfortable upper fret access. For people with large hands, however, the "devil horns" (particularly on the treble side) recurve a bit too much back into the neck, and you can easily collect the point of the horn on the outside palm of your hand unless you rotate your hand.

Because the SG was designed badly (the original '61 neck/body area was pretty delicate), the fix pushed the neck pickup toward the bridge pickup more than on the LP. In fact, most SGs that have 22 frets can easily be redesigned with 24-fret fretboards without displacing that pickup, and that may account for another part of the sound difference between the LP and the SG, at least when the neck or both pickups are engaged.

The maple cap actually has little to do with the tone of the body and in many cases is NOT denser or heavier than the mahogany upon which it's mounted. Note, too, that some studios never came with a maple cap. This was the subject of a small sidebar at NAMM several years ago, where otherwise identical bodies were weighed and compared with and without maple caps. Yet another guitar myth shot down.

My personal preference is for a solid bodied LP (no cheesing, no chambering) with a stubby cutaway point (the horn on my Gibsons catches my large left hand), an Axcess-style shaved neck heel and a tummy cut.

Flights of Fancy (building an LP):
If I'm building from the ground up, I'd add a heavier bridge and mount it on the 10.5 ounce sustain block featured on the early '80's Ibanez AR300s and Yamaha SG2000s. I'd eliminate the tuning issues by using the old Kahler Fliplock string lock and the TP-6 bridge with fine tuners. I'd have locking tuners to speed up string changes, jumbo frets, a wide/thin neck profile with a 16" radius and, likely, a 25.5" scale with a 24-fret fretboard. I'd eliminate the current control system and sub in a master volume and a master tone, add a Chandler Tone-X active sweepable mids boost on a push-pull, a Sustainer intensity knob and a Buckethead-style kill switch (yeah, that's five holes). The Sustainer controls would mount behind the bridge, and I'd have a single coil size neck pickup for better bottom string clarity.
#8
I have both, both are great. They are quite different in feel and the SG shape has the tendency to neck dive when you let go of it.

You really need to go try both guitars, or go used and get both for less than the price of a new Studio
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#9
Quote by dspellman
....
My personal preference is for a solid bodied LP (no cheesing, no chambering) with a stubby cutaway point (the horn on my Gibsons catches my large left hand), an Axcess-style shaved neck heel and a tummy cut.
....


Have you seen the new 2016 Trad High Performance model? Titanium Zero Fret, and the Access Style cutaway and smooth heel joint.
Moving on.....
#10
Quote by KenG
Have you seen the new 2016 Trad High Performance model? Titanium Zero Fret, and the Access Style cutaway and smooth heel joint.


Yup.

Honestly, I'm so packed with LP-style guitars at the moment, and the four I'm using most all have Floyds as well, that I wouldn't consider it, but it's well past time for Gibson to be offering that guitar. They're also offering 25.5" scale LPs now, which is interesting.

What they still haven't offered are jumbo frets, stainless frets, a 16" radius and a modern finish. That's coming (I'm told)...
#11
The modern finish will be an issue unless they want to retool. Of course with 2 separate facilities for solid bodies maybe the USA will go water based laquer and the RIs will be able to keep offering the Nitro.
Moving on.....
#12
Quote by Sunfist
I get the impression from various magazine stories and things of that nature that the general consensus is that the LP is a better guitar than the SG. My first guitar ever was an SG and I have never found another I liked better. In what way is the LP better or are they in fact very similar to each other in terms of tone and versatility.


nothing "better" about a Les Paul they sound somewhat different and play differently. personally i greatly prefer playing SGs especially the original spec ones. the LP has a thicker tone generally but the fret access on the SG suites me better.
#13
Quote by KenG
The modern finish will be an issue unless they want to retool. Of course with 2 separate facilities for solid bodies maybe the USA will go water based laquer and the RIs will be able to keep offering the Nitro.


That's what I'm thinking, too. Retooling shouldn't be a big issue for them in this case; UV-catalyzed polyester would have them dry to dry and out of the finish department in under 24 hours. That's a tremendous boost in their production times. They *could* put in a robotized arm and fixture like the one at Taylor. That would give them a thinner, more even finish than what they're getting now and reduce employee health issues, and it would definitely reduce labor costs.

If they maintain the nitrocellulose on guitars that really NEED to be "traditional" and move to a modern finish on standard production (or even just the high performance versions at first), they'll still get some carping from some of their customer base -- until the guitars get out there and folks get used to them (or, better yet, don't even think about it).