#1
I have recently began using pedals to change my sound a bit, and like many, many other people in this world, the first pedal I bought was a Boss DS-1.

Although, I have found by my inexperienced ways, whenever I try to turn on the distortion everything sounds very abrupt and it kinda makes it sound scrappy, especially if there is not much space to engage the pedal (Say between verse and chorus)

Anybody any tips?
#2
I'm not exactly sure what you are asking here, but it seems like there is either a delay in pedal engagement, which could be a faulty pedal, or maybe you have the level on your pedal too high causing a disparity between the two tones you are trying to use. Without more specifics, that is about the best I could come up with. As far as pedal engagement, it should be pretty close to instant, if it doesn't come on or turn off as soon as you step on it, then the pedal is probably bad.
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#3
DS-1's, although a popular seller, are perhaps Boss's worst pedal (with the possible exception of their "metal" pedals.)
My tip is to toss that piece of crap away and buy something better. What amp are you using? Your pedals need to compliment your amp. If your amp is shit, no pedal will save it.
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#4
perhaps you need to work on the pedals controls to get the best sound out of it. what amp are you using and is the amp set clean? pedal danceing is an artform onto itself so you may need to get used to that as well.
#5
Yeah, I'm not a big fan of stand alone distortion pedals because many of them just miss the mark. I much prefer a good sounding amp. With that said, if you must use a distortion pedal, for whatever reason, there are a few options out there depending on budget, since the DS-1, as Cathbard said, is bottom of the barrel. The Big muff is pretty good for a killer retro sound, and a Metal Muff is pretty decent for metal tones, plus it has a built in boost. The MXR 5150 Overdrive pedal sounds great, too. Even though they call it an overdrive pedal, there is a lot more gain on it than your typical overdrive pedal, so I consider it more of a stand alone distortion pedal than a traditional overdrive. Ideally, if you don't like the sound of your amp, or you are unable to use the gain channel for whatever reason, you might just want to save up for a better amp, which you can get for a relatively low price on the used market. It's difficult to make suggestions without a budget or what genre you play, though.
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Jackson King V
Peavey Valveking 100
Ampeg VH140C
Boss TU-3 Chromatic Tuner
MXR ZW-44 Overdrive
Dunlop ZW-45 Wah
Boss NS-2 Noise Suppressor
Digitech JamMan Solo XT
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#7
Buy yourself a multi-effects unit like a Boss ME-50 or something. They have every pedal you'll ever use. Experiment and play with different effects to get a feel for them, then go and buy individually stomp boxes when you know what you want/need.
#8
set the tone control to around 10-11 o'clock. that's about the only setting it souinds good at. and probably keep the distortion below 12 o'clock.
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#9
Quote by ToastPimp
I have recently began using pedals to change my sound a bit, and like many, many other people in this world, the first pedal I bought was a Boss DS-1.

Although, I have found by my inexperienced ways, whenever I try to turn on the distortion everything sounds very abrupt and it kinda makes it sound scrappy, especially if there is not much space to engage the pedal (Say between verse and chorus)

Anybody any tips?


The DS1, despite it's popularity, is one of the worst drive pedals ever made. If you put in front of a 100 watt tube marshall it may sound" decent", but even in that scenario the 100 watt tube Marshall amp responsible for 95% of the tone.
#10
Quote by Cathbard
DS-1's, although a popular seller, are perhaps Boss's worst pedal (with the possible exception of their "metal" pedals.)
My tip is to toss that piece of crap away and buy something better. What amp are you using? Your pedals need to compliment your amp. If your amp is shit, no pedal will save it.


This is spot on.
#11
it wouldn't be my favourite distortion pedal but in certain situations i quite like the ds1.

and the amp is responsible for a lot of the tone with pretty much every pedal.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?