#1
So I started lesson a few weeks ago now, the guy is a good guitarist and really, really knows his theory but that seems to be the only thing that he's teaching me, I told him that I am more interested in learning my guitar skills and techniques and I already have a small basic understanding of theory. but every time I ask something he always comes back with saying you need to know this and this to be able to do that etc... Am not sure am learning how to be better at guitar playing with this teacher, every time I ask a question he relates back to theory techniques. I've literally played the guitar in his lesson for about 2 minutes and listened to him talk the rest of the time. Is this the normal teaching process? or is he just trying to make out that I need to know all this theory to play guitar? Not sure what to do tbh... Any advice?
#2
Find another teacher better suited to your interests. I went through this with piano when I was a kid. I had two years of lessons and got nowhere except some basic theory. And I still don't like keyboards as a result. My mate went to a good teacher who fed his interests, and he went on to become a part-time keyboard pro.
#3
a good teacher will show you how to play things and also explain why it's done that way. theory is good to know but that doesn't help you with technique which is the physical part of playing. perhaps explaining that you need more guidance on the physical end would help. as for playing well the point of the lesson is to teach you something. you then take that home and work on it. i assume you have to play last weeks lesson for him right? is he playing stuff for you to watch?
#4
From the thread title I thought you were going to say you had two teachers: one who gave you lavish praise for your progress, and other who smacked you in the head with a phone book and called you lazy.
#5
Kind of a "Good cop/bad cop" thing, huh Monkeyleg? LOL..nice

I found a new teacher, planning on taking my 3rd lesson soon! (been playing 30 years- badly).
#6
I have had a variety of teachers, and as a guitar teacher I have had a variety of students. Often it's just a personality clash or difference in goals rather than good or bad.

The best teachers typically do a few things well:

1. Quickly evaluate the students skill level and where they want to go. What songs or skills are they interested in? Then focus on what comes next in their development towards their goals. Some are content as a bedroom noodler and some want to advance to professional session work. Very different goals and teaching approach.

2. Teach songs of interest to the student while folding in the relevant chords and scales used.

3. Need to add a set of chord changes or scale to broaden their vocabulary? Find a song that uses them. Keep adding fresh ideas and information while stretching them a bit.

4. Expect the student to practice regularly and be able to master each lesson over time. Some scales and changes can be mastered easily in one week. Some may require a much longer period to play fluently.

A few of my students were extremely fast learners and devoured everything I had to offer. Others learned much more slowly but eventually became good players. Some figured out that golf was their game, not music. It takes all kinds.
#7
Quote by Cajundaddy
I have had a variety of teachers, and as a guitar teacher I have had a variety of students. Often it's just a personality clash or difference in goals rather than good or bad.

The best teachers typically do a few things well:

1. Quickly evaluate the students skill level and where they want to go. What songs or skills are they interested in? Then focus on what comes next in their development towards their goals. Some are content as a bedroom noodler and some want to advance to professional session work. Very different goals and teaching approach.

2. Teach songs of interest to the student while folding in the relevant chords and scales used.

3. Need to add a set of chord changes or scale to broaden their vocabulary? Find a song that uses them. Keep adding fresh ideas and information while stretching them a bit.

4. Expect the student to practice regularly and be able to master each lesson over time. Some scales and changes can be mastered easily in one week. Some may require a much longer period to play fluently.

A few of my students were extremely fast learners and devoured everything I had to offer. Others learned much more slowly but eventually became good players. Some figured out that golf was their game, not music. It takes all kinds.



exactly my approach when i was teaching. i used to drive my teacher nuts back in the day because i didn't really just want to learn songs at all. i had him come up with new exercises every week designed to make me a better player. he also showed how each thing was used in a song that i knew. if you learn to actually play the guitar then you can figure out the songs yourself which to me is part of the goal. i also wrote and recorded my first 2 songs with him which gave me much valuable insight (he worked in a recording studio).

for my students i stressed actually learning to play the guitar intead of being led by the nose on playing songs.
#8
Quote by heaven086
So I started lesson a few weeks ago now, the guy is a good guitarist and really, really knows his theory but that seems to be the only thing that he's teaching me, I told him that I am more interested in learning my guitar skills and techniques and I already have a small basic understanding of theory. but every time I ask something he always comes back with saying you need to know this and this to be able to do that etc... Am not sure am learning how to be better at guitar playing with this teacher, every time I ask a question he relates back to theory techniques. I've literally played the guitar in his lesson for about 2 minutes and listened to him talk the rest of the time. Is this the normal teaching process? or is he just trying to make out that I need to know all this theory to play guitar? Not sure what to do tbh... Any advice?


Basic theory is very important - once you grasp what the notes are and how major and minor chords work, the major scale, intervals etc. -that knowledge will help you learn countless songs and remember them very easily.

That being said, theory is useless without musical examples - so get him to teach you theory within a musical context.

If all your teacher is doing is rambling for 30 minutes at a time, he's a terrible teacher.
#9
I'd consider chemistry as well. I've only had a couple lessons, but the one I had a few months ago was really weird and awkward. He seemed like a pleasant guy, but there was something missing between us.

The new guy....we'll see. Told him what my skill level was, was frank and honest in my assessment, and told him what I wanted from him. Hopefully has a a good sense of humor, that'll make things a little less weird/tense.
#10
Quote by heaven086
So I started lesson a few weeks ago now, the guy is a good guitarist and really, really knows his theory but that seems to be the only thing that he's teaching me, I told him that I am more interested in learning my guitar skills and techniques and I already have a small basic understanding of theory. but every time I ask something he always comes back with saying you need to know this and this to be able to do that etc... Am not sure am learning how to be better at guitar playing with this teacher, every time I ask a question he relates back to theory techniques. I've literally played the guitar in his lesson for about 2 minutes and listened to him talk the rest of the time. Is this the normal teaching process? or is he just trying to make out that I need to know all this theory to play guitar? Not sure what to do tbh... Any advice?


You need to be playing in lessons. Guitar is a muscle memory exercise and you can't get better unless you are playing and the teacher can correct your technique. Find a teacher that has you playing way more in lessons and doing more practical work at this stage. Theory is important but only makes more sense once you have some music and songs being played and learned!

I would ditch the teacher. He is unconsciously covering up that he doesn't know how to instruct someone on how to do what he can!! Nothing to do with him as a person, just as an instructor.
Visit my music school site for advice on gear, music theory and lessons.
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#11
The best teacher I ever had was my first jamming partner who was also a friend. He needed someone to play the chord progressions while he progressed on his improvisation skills. In trade he taught me new things every time. We both got better.