#2
For the first one, it's not that you're not playing in time, but more like you're playing the wrong rhythms. The main problem is that you don't know it well enough. Sit down and transcribe the rhythms if you aren't sure. Also, there are a couple of wrong notes. I heard a major 2nd somewhere where it should be a descending minor 3rd. But overall it's not that bad.
#3
^2nded.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#4
Thank's a lot guys. Actually earlier I was not able to play in time so when I did this take I didn't focus on the phrasing or the rhythm, all I wanted was to be in time. But ill focus on your input from now on.
#5
To me, quite a bit of your solo is in time. But there are messy parts (e.g. where you're playing a scale run covering more of the neck).

If you can, get a copy of Transcribe (seventhstring), and slow down whatever tracks you're trying to learn. Gradually speed the tracks back up, or even to faster than x1.

You are absolutely right to worry about timing ... it is essential ... so also work with a metronome, record yourself, and listen out where things have gone wrong (again with Transcribe). But you are a long way from being someone that can't play in time.

I'd also advise you work on some medium speeed tracks, that have bends, and vibrato. These are some of the most expressive tools we have in out guitar toolbox ... don't let shredding rule ... you need a balance as you build your skills.

Pay attention to the fine detail, practise what you're weak at (not what you're good at) and you'll do well. The ability is definitely there.
#6
Quote by jerrykramskoy
To me, quite a bit of your solo is in time. But there are messy parts (e.g. where you're playing a scale run covering more of the neck).

If you can, get a copy of Transcribe (seventhstring), and slow down whatever tracks you're trying to learn. Gradually speed the tracks back up, or even to faster than x1.

You are absolutely right to worry about timing ... it is essential ... so also work with a metronome, record yourself, and listen out where things have gone wrong (again with Transcribe). But you are a long way from being someone that can't play in time.

I'd also advise you work on some medium speeed tracks, that have bends, and vibrato. These are some of the most expressive tools we have in out guitar toolbox ... don't let shredding rule ... you need a balance as you build your skills.

Pay attention to the fine detail, practise what you're weak at (not what you're good at) and you'll do well. The ability is definitely there.



Thank you so much for the detailed critique man. I push myself to work with a metronome despite it being totally boring. I'll work more on it. I have transcribe, it's a major help. Thank you so much!
#7
Have you ever played rhythm guitar? If you only focus on playing fast and technical stuff, you may not pay any attention to the groove. I think your technique is good. Now start focusing on playing something slower and something more rhythm based. I think your technical skill is way beyond your "musical" skill. And you need to start working on your ear too. If you only play from tabs, it may be hard to get the rhythms right because you never put any effort in figuring out exactly how it should be played.

Add some expression to your playing. Now it sounds like you are just playing notes after notes. Remember that there's more to music than just "right notes". You need to be able to play slowly before you can play fast. If you want to learn a solo, learn something slower. Something where other things than just the "right notes" matter. Something where your phrasing matters. Learn it preferably by ear and listen to HOW the original solo is played. Not just what notes it uses but how those notes are played. Also, pay attention to the rhythm. When certain notes are played. Use the "one-e-and-a, two-e-and-a" thing to subdivide your beats.

If you have problems with rhythm, just slow it down.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#8
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Have you ever played rhythm guitar? If you only focus on playing fast and technical stuff, you may not pay any attention to the groove. I think your technique is good. Now start focusing on playing something slower and something more rhythm based. I think your technical skill is way beyond your "musical" skill. And you need to start working on your ear too. If you only play from tabs, it may be hard to get the rhythms right because you never put any effort in figuring out exactly how it should be played.

Add some expression to your playing. Now it sounds like you are just playing notes after notes. Remember that there's more to music than just "right notes". You need to be able to play slowly before you can play fast. If you want to learn a solo, learn something slower. Something where other things than just the "right notes" matter. Something where your phrasing matters. Learn it preferably by ear and listen to HOW the original solo is played. Not just what notes it uses but how those notes are played. Also, pay attention to the rhythm. When certain notes are played. Use the "one-e-and-a, two-e-and-a" thing to subdivide your beats.

If you have problems with rhythm, just slow it down.


I've recently started focusing heavily on rhythm. I also started singing while playing rhythm guitar to get the feel of it. My major problem was timing so i didnt really focus on feel in this. I'll focus on listening to the originals and figuring out how the guitarist plays the note as I didn't focus on that much before.