#1
I used to buy elixir strings so I didn't have to deal with this. Unfortunately, they don't make a 008 so I buy Ernie Ball enamel coated, enamel coated on the wound strings. The non-wound strings are not rustproof. They are just regular Ernie Ball strings with an added gimmick of extra winding reinforced ball and ends.

Two questions please

Does anybody make an 008 set that is totally rustproof?. I can't find one.

What's the best way to remove corrosion off of non-wound guitar strings?

I use sandpaper but certainly there's a better way.

I will not wipe my strings off after every use. They still get black anyway and I'm lazy I hate the feeling of being obligated to give my strings a good wipe down every time I pick up my guitar.

The Ernie Ball enamel coated wound strings last long time. I'm pretty sure they don't last quite as long as elixir. I've got an old acoustic guitar with elixirs on it that I pick up once in a while. I don't know how old the strings are on it over a year maybe two I don't know maybe three so long ago I can't remember and they still sound great. I had to change the coated Ernie balls on my Gibson ES 339 because they were starting to sound a little dead after a few months really not that long time, a lot longer than regular strings but not as long as elixirs.

When I put the new strings on I was surprised at how dead the old ones had gotten.

I was also worried about enamel, isn't enamel pretty hard, hard enough to cause excessive fret wear? The elixirs are coated of course with a material so soft you don't have to worry about that.
Last edited by yope at Jan 25, 2016,
#2
I cut a little pad of 3000 grit polishing paper and give a very light glide over the strings when they get grubby. Otherwise just make a habit of keeping your hands clean and dry and wiping your strings down after you play. You're spending time with one method or the other.
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#3
Quote by Stillhouse
I cut a little pad of 3000 grit polishing paper and give a very light glide over the strings when they get grubby. Otherwise just make a habit of keeping your hands clean and dry and wiping your strings down after you play. You're spending time with one method or the other.


This. I have very sweaty hands, and doing these 2 simple procedures makes my strings last much longer. Wash my hands and dry them well before playing, and after playing, wipe each string individually with soft cloth.

I was never a fan of coated strings, never got along with their feel and sound. So I just use regular Daddarios and they can hold up quite well for 1-1.5 months max.
#4
How about:

GHS Super Steels
GHS Sub-zero Boomers
Ernie Ball Stainless Steel
Dean Markley Blue Steel
#5
i use these wipes: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/accessories/big-bends-guitar-string-wipes

the small size is enough. i wipe once every one or two weeks, or when the strings feel especially yucky underneath. i like these disposable ones because you can get them torn up and it's okay. when it's really dirty, i fold up the wipe to get a thick pad, then i stick it on the blunt edge of a pair of scissors (or anything hard), and rub the pad underneath the string. really gets the underside smooth again.
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#6
Quote by Stillhouse
I cut a little pad of 3000 grit polishing paper and give a very light glide over the strings when they get grubby. Otherwise just make a habit of keeping your hands clean and dry and wiping your strings down after you play. You're spending time with one method or the other.


I have an obsession with washing my hands before I play my guitar. I do not like the feeling of touching my guitar with greasy sweaty hands, so that's one saving grace I have.
With one exception, that old acoustic I told you about. I have that sitting here by the computer I just pick it up and play it whenever I want grubby hands or not. My three electric guitars have to be kept nice though.
#7
I am a blues player and sweaty greasy strings are important and necessary for proper guitar tone

I use a little lemon oil on a rag and wipe the underside of strings I want to save periodically. This cleans and adds light lubrication which I like for those manly SRV slides. After cleaning if the strings have noticeable fret grooves on the underside they are dead and get tossed.
#8
Quote by Cajundaddy
I am a blues player and sweaty greasy strings are important and necessary for proper guitar tone

I use a little lemon oil on a rag and wipe the underside of strings I want to save periodically. This cleans and adds light lubrication which I like for those manly SRV slides. After cleaning if the strings have noticeable fret grooves on the underside they are dead and get tossed.


It's a give-and-take. At a certain point old strings have an advantage in that they are little more trustworthy to stay in tune. Then they reach that point where they have undesirable Wolf tones especially on the higher notes and they play out of tune because they are so badly damaged. I usually change strings before that happens but sometimes they get old enough that I could hear that going on . You play a high note and you don't get a nice even tone it goes oo.OO,oo, OO . I don't know what that's technically called . The same thing that happens on Stratocaster's a lot of times with high notes even with new strings if the pickups are too close. Especially on the lower strings.

I like finger- ease, can't live without it. When I played bands it was fun because I'd spray my strings and everybody else would want to be sprayed down too.
Last edited by yope at Jan 25, 2016,
#9
Maybe try stainless steel guitar strings.
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#10
Sometimes if I suddenly notice my strings are a little dead and the guitar shops are shut I will put some lemon oil on a pad of toilet roll and run it up and down the strings a few times, it takes a load of gunk and rust off them.
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#11
Quote by DeathByDestroyr
Maybe try stainless steel guitar strings.


I thought I'd found my perfect guitar string when I used stainless steel . I went through about a half a dozen sets I guess then I heard since stainless steel is harder than the metal on your frets they eat up your frets fast. Sure enough there was fret wear on my new guitar.

I quit using stainless steel. The frets look almost the same as they did 15 years ago when I quit stainless steel. They sound better than normal strings , the difference is obvious. I could never hear a big difference between any brand of string. Stainless steel's I can hear a big difference.

I had one guitar then and played it all the time. Now I have several. That helped reduce fret wear also .
I guess a little fret wear you can get by with because the guitar still works okay. Actually it works great. It's a Carvin kit guitar. I can't say enough good about the necks on them...

Thanks for all the tips.