#1
This question has been bothering me for a while now...

Why does it seem like just about every company has a guitar that looks very similar to the Fender Stratocaster (You know, the strat shaped guitar with 3 single coil pickups)?

I tried asking some friends of mine, they didn't know either :/

I hope this post isn't breaking any forum rules (I'm still getting to know them. Sorry)

-Parac
#2
Cost it takes to build a guitar with a bolt-on neck as opposed to a set-neck/neck-thru design had to do with it in the earlier days.

Comfortable contours in the body, a neck that isn't too thick, and the versatility in the them. Hell, if a Fender/Squier strat is routed out for it, so can change the pickups to HH, SSS, HSH, HSS, HHH, or any other combination.

Besides the cost and aesthetics, it's probably due to the notability of them. From Hendrix, Clapton, Dave Murray, and SVR using Fenders to guys like Steve Vai using other companies version od a super-Strat (Ibanez Jem, RG line), it's kind of hard to not be able to recognize that guitar.
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#4
It sells. Main reason right there. Same reason tons of brands have Tele-shapes, V-shapes, Explorer-shapes, Les-paul-shapes, etc. Sales.
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#5
A Strat just has great fit, feel, and balance. It was designed to play 4 hr gigs every week. So many other designs look cool but play awkward.
#6
It's a brilliant design that is simple and functional and has universal appeal/isn't very offensive to many. It maintains some design elements of the acoustic guitar while adding something new/different. It has become so widespread that it's what most think of the when they hear "electric guitar."
#10
Quote by Parac
This question has been bothering me for a while now...

Why does it seem like just about every company has a guitar that looks very similar to the Fender Stratocaster (You know, the strat shaped guitar with 3 single coil pickups)?


The core of its popularity stems from its completely radical design (as viewed from a mid-50's perspective), and from its deep connection with early rock and roll. One of keys to the Stratocaster's success was the way Fender advertised it.

"In other companies' catalogs you would see professional players, wearing a business suit and wingtip shoes or whatever, sitting on a stool in a studio, playing an expensive guitar," Wheeler says. Open a Fender catalog from the '60s, though, and you'd see "girls in bikinis and guys in board shorts, with surfboards in the background, sitting around a campfire."


The same question can be asked of tube amps, 4x12 cabinets, the Les Paul. None of these things works particularly well in light of what we now have available in terms of modern guitars, but all of them hang on because they're part of the Baby Boomer's generation's shared sound track and a wave of powerful nostalgia.
#11
combination of being a really good design that's super comfortable and ergonomic, and being what was popular when electric guitars took off at the start. they work, and they sell, basically.
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#12
Leo got it right and Hendrix made it the icon for all guitar players.

Then it just got bigger around the world since then.

The same goes for Marshall amps exept Jim Marshall were behind that one. Hendrix showed the world the magic of them.
#13
Iconic and cheap to make. On top of that, the body shape is very ergonomic and easy to play.
#14
Comfort, as has been mentioned. Also the controls. Every control is within reach of the pinky finger. The jack on the front makes it easier to play while sitting. Light weight compared to the Les Paul, ES-335, SG, and other rock guitars.
#16
Quote by Stickymongoose
Buddy Holly.



I'm not sure how much he influenced sales of strats. Probably about the same amount as his influence on horn-rim glasses.

Buddy Holly has become mythological, but the reality is that he had ONE number one single and a career that lasted only a year and a half. When he died, his current album was experiencing sluggish sales. It was *because* he died that his music began to take off (never underestimate the power of a dead artist), particularly in Britain.
#18
Misirlou...ah, a classic. Fender Strats sell well overall, whether it be due to fame from others, playability, comfort, looks, price, or a combination of all of the above. Personally, Fender is a very reliable brand.
#19
The acutual history of Fender has the company going down and sold to CBS in 1965. Various sources says that the sales of the Stratocaster was dropping and they were thinking/planning to discontiue it.

In UK they had just got the 50 watt Marshall heads and combo amps going. Eric Clapton played a combo on the Blues breaker album. He did use a Les Paul but every guitar player goes what is that sound.

The Who wanted more power so Jim Marshall went to work and by mid 1966 the Marshall 100 watt heads was born including 4*12 cabs top and bottom.

Eric Clapton puts together CREAM playing the Marshall stack with a Les Paul in the start of it.

Mean while in september Jimi Hendrix lands in UK, the roadie caring the strat, with Chas Chandler who made Jimi meet all the musicians including Eric Clapton.

While Clapton was god by the Cream gig with Hendrix it was clear that god was surpassed and Eric /Jeff Beck kind of thought to pack it in.

Everything in Rock changed and suddenly a Fender Stratocaster got sold as as the cool guitar it deserved.

Ok Marshall and Fender Stratocaster which started to show in the hands of Eric Clapton, Beck, Gilmor, Blackmore etc.
#20
the Strat is ergonomic, light weight, sounds great and is cheap to manufacture - it's really that simple.
#21
it's the clay dots.


it's always been the clay dots.
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#22
Forgot how it all came back to USA.

The Jimi Hendrix Experience is taking UK by storm and other countries in Europe. The rock elite of Beatles, Stones, Traffic, Cream etc. all know and are loyal fans that can't really think of much else so Paul McCartney suggest JHE to play at the 1967 Montery pop festival in US.

If you have not watched the film I highly suggest you do.

There it was with 1 Marshall stack behind each of the 2 and Jimi playing a Stratocaster giving them the experience. For added effect he may also had used the Fender amps as pictures shows it.

You never heard or seen anything like it since!
#23
The Strat shape caught on with other manufacturers because it is easier to sling over your shoulder than a Fender Stringmaster Quad.
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#24
Because Dick Dale plays them!

Dick Dale was the first guitar player to sling his guitar low and crank his amp to 10 and shred! He kept blowing up his Fender amps and Leo had to custom make one for him that he could crank up!


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#26
The burned Strat was the first burned by Hendrix in 1967. Never Miami as Dwezil had the wrong information at the time.

Jimi burned 3 strats and 2 are known while the 3rd is being worked on by univibes.com.

The first one was Finsbury on the Walkerbrothers tour package in 1967. Jimi kept that Strat for a while but gave it to a roadie some time later. The roadie spend some time in 1968 at Zappa's residence in US.

The second was at the Monterey festival. That is how do to it. See the film!

The 3rd was in US 1967 after Monterey but been little known and facts are a question.

Then a fake one exist as well that is said to be the first one but the details of that one does not fit at all compared to one another. Said to come from Jimi's management in UK who had found in his garage or something. This one is basically still playable while Jimi said his was ruined.
#27
Quote by Parac
This question has been bothering me for a while now...

Why does it seem like just about every company has a guitar that looks very similar to the Fender Stratocaster (You know, the strat shaped guitar with 3 single coil pickups)?

I tried asking some friends of mine, they didn't know either :/

I hope this post isn't breaking any forum rules (I'm still getting to know them. Sorry)

-Parac



Because it sells. They'd stop making them if they didn't sell.
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#28
Because Strats are fucking sick, that's why. They just have "it." I am more a fan of some of the Strat spinoffs than the original, but man, for a guy that had no interest in rock music and didn't play guitar, Leo really hit home with the Strat.
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#29
Quote by dementiacaptain
Because Strats are fucking sick, that's why. They just have "it." I am more a fan of some of the Strat spinoffs than the original, but man, for a guy that had no interest in rock music and didn't play guitar, Leo really hit home with the Strat.


Dunno about Leo, but somebody put some real thought into the design.
#30
Quote by reverb66
the Strat is ergonomic, light weight, sounds great and is cheap to manufacture - it's really that simple.

In a nutshell, yup.

Quote by gregs1020
it's the clay dots.


it's always been the clay dots.

Great, now everyone who's read this thread has to die
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#31
Quote by K33nbl4d3
Great, now everyone who's read this thread has to die

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#32
Electric guitar sales are dominated by strat and les paul shapes. They just work, and they look like an electric guitar. Even with just 2 dominant shapes, take a look at any other instrument and you'll see guitar has the most variety.
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#33
I think it was this cartoon in a old edition of guitar world where you see a long haired dude shreading his ass of. Then a picture of Eric Clapton in suit and a please do not smoking sign behind clearly behind him olaying a Stratocaster.

Kind of like old age for guitarist but scary and funny.

But as Gilmour saying in the video you can hear any player on Stratocaster better and if you have paid you dues in learning to get to know it the soul of your creative expresion should come out sounding convising enough compared to any other style of guitar.

I ended up with one home build Stratocaster which is now 21 years ago and while I had at least 2 $5000 guitars Gibson and Jackson Rhoads custom + some 2 other Fender Stratocasters somehow this "Blackie" smokes them and makes my music more clear.

#34
Honestly, the Strat is quite simply an incredibly practical design. Besides the neck joint I can think of little that could meaningfully be improved, though I'm sure dspellman has some ideas. I might even agree with some of them.
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#35
Quote by anders.jorgense

The Who wanted more power so Jim Marshall went to work and by mid 1966 the Marshall 100 watt heads was born including 4*12 cabs top and bottom.

not quite, the first stack cabs Marshall made were 8x12's the 4x12 came latter because the 8x12 was stupid heavy.
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#36
Didn't Leo make the 180w transformer to try and be loud enough for Dick Dale? I wonder if Dick and Pete ever met.
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#37
Quote by Robbgnarly
not quite, the first stack cabs Marshall made were 8x12's the 4x12 came latter because the 8x12 was stupid heavy.


That is partly correct but by mid 66 they did have 4*12 cabinets in their pricelists! They had it sorted out from building the first atempt which were the 8*12 and yes the roadies complained about them being heavy.

So back to second atempt of creation and 4*12? Yes that will do and it fits the new 100 watts heads including the slant top. Guitarists and roadies approved. They later got wheels and handles on the sides.