#1
I have an HSS strat and I loved the sound of my single coils when I had 250k pots on but switched it back to 500k for the humbucker and rolled back the tone knob whenever I'd use my single coils. now I have a 500k volume pot and a 250k tone pot. Humbucker in the bridge still sounds kinda dark, is there way to exclude it from the tone pot so that only the volume pot affects it? I only have room for one volume and one tone btw.
#2
You need to disconnect the tone pot from the circuit when you want to use the humbucker. I did this with a Fender super switch once by dedicating one of the poles of the switch strictly to having a tone knob connected in certain positions.

You could do this with a push/pull pot too, but it would be kind of weird to have a control simply for that. A no-load pot could work too, because when you turn them to 10 they're supposed to be disconnected to give you a bit more brightness.
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#3
How do I do that? A no load pot isn't an option since I usually have my tone at around 8 o'clock.
#4
Sorry for the bad picture quality- I took this with a cell phone years ago.

The quarter of the switch the red arrow is pointing to is the pole I dedicated to the bridge tone knob. Ignore that block with 6 terminals at the top left corner.

On a Fender super switch, you have 4 rows of 5 terminals where the rows aren't connected instead of the standard 2 rows of 3 terminals. This means there's no blending of the connections when you put the selector switch to positions 2 and 4, and you have a lot more options for wiring configurations.

I wanted the tone knob to work on positions 5-3, so the tone knob was connected to those 3 terminals. Just hook the common terminal to the volume pot, and you're good to go.

Wait for other replies- this one worked for me, but someone else might have something to say about it or offer a better alternative. I don't like how much wire and open connections there are in this one because it should make it noisier.
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Last edited by JimDawson at Jan 28, 2016,
#5
if the tone is usually around 8 o'clock you can use a very small valued capacitor to perminantly put the guitar into it, I just woke up so my math isn't great yet

but regardless of pot value for tone controls it's the same 0 and the same 10 , of course types come into play like how they roll off the resistance, but lets just assume only B500k pots exist. So getting back to it; what do I mean by the same 10 and 0 on a tone pot value ....well... the resistance has nothing to do with sound. It's sensitivity so in the sense that even if you got a 2m (2000k) pot for the tone which do exist it would still sound the same, so say a100k pot is going straight to walmart, the 2000k is going the most ridiculously scenic route possible ever.You're still getting those low prices and seeing disgruntled employees but you've got more control of the pot.

however what I do recommend for a standard tone pot is getting the right capacitor value, 0,022uf is standard on single coils , 0.047 for humbuckers, on a Godin guitar that may have been HSS they went with a happy medium of 0.033uf to balance everything out. The larger the capacitor value the more greater the effect.

With the push pull you'd be adding the capacitor to the harness any time you want. You can also add a push pull to have 7 sounds out of the guitar instead of 5 , the 7 way mod allows you to use all 3 pickups or the outer 2 for some sounds you never get out of your guitar. On youtube the video is called "how to beef up" your strats sound.
Last edited by Tallwood13 at Jan 28, 2016,
#6
I like having my tone at around 8 o'clock so I have kind of treble boost in my hands when I need it. Haha.

If you look at this vid, his tone controls had an effect on the tone even when it was on 10.
He had some sort of graph of the eq to show that change in tone.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W8dp9clGe-I

I guess it's not possible to that mod with a regular switch then?
#7
Do you have two tone knobs, or just one?

If you have two, it's easy. Just wire one tone to the neck and one to the middle before they hit the switch. No problem.

With two, you'll have to fake it, or use a super switch, or some other workaround. The most obvious fake is to use a dual-ganged pot to set up dual tone controls in one housing for the neck/middle before the switch. An easier fake would be to wire in a permanent filter on just the neck pickup (or the middle), and then wire the tone control to the other single coil. You could also wire in a Gretsch-style 'mud switch' for a two or three position tone control without a knob. You could do that for any number of pickups on the switch, though it would require a double pole switch instead of a single pole if you wanted two pickups. One or all three would just need a single pole switch. So if you always use the tone at either 8 or 10, you could use a DPDT to swap in an RC pair (basically a parked tone knob) set to "8" and "10" (or whatever you like) for those two pickups. That could replace your tone knob, and then you'd have exactly
#8
Quote by UGBugs
If you look at this vid, his tone controls had an effect on the tone even when it was on 10.
He had some sort of graph of the eq to show that change in tone.

I guess it's not possible to that mod with a regular switch then?


That's because the capacitor is still in the circuit- it's just behind all the resistance of the pot. Having a higher resistance pot allows more highs to stay in the circuit because it's harder for the signal to bleed away through the capacitor.

This equation is for figuring out the resistance of a capacitor at a certain frequency (impedance) for an AC circuit:

Z= 1/(2pi*F*C)

Z is the impedance of the capacitor in Ohms, F is frequency in Hertz and C is the value of the capacitor in Farads (.022 uF would be .000000022 F). Since the impedance of the tone pot isn't going to change by a significant amount at the frequencies a guitar uses, just add that value on top of the result to see how it will work at a specific frequency or knob position.


You could do it with a regular switch I think, but you'd still have the tone pot connected in position 4 along with the bridge humbucker. It just depends on whether or not this is acceptable for you. Can't visualize it too clearly right now, but I think you could have one side of the switch connecting your pickups to the volume knob through the common terminal and the other side connecting your neck and mid pickup to the tone pot. I'd need to draw it out and remember how those switches work to confirm it though- something doesn't add up.
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Last edited by JimDawson at Jan 28, 2016,
#9
Quote by Roc8995
Do you have two tone knobs, or just one?

If you have two, it's easy. Just wire one tone to the neck and one to the middle before they hit the switch. No problem.



Just have one bro.

Thanks JimDawson! Really useful stuff though I'm still trying to fully understand it

My capacitor value right now is .047uF. Would you recommend changing the value?
#10
I'd try a .022 and a .015 to see if those help. I bet a smaller cap would make the tone knob more tolerable for the humbucker.

You could also try a 500K tone pot.
#11
I just switched from 500k to 250k. 500k for the tone pot made the single coils sound too trebley for me. I'll try to give the cap thing a go. Prolly a .022uF since that's what most humbucker equipped guitars use.

Would a humbucker sized p90 work though? Are p90s generally brighter than humbuckers? I've never tried p90s before. I've heard that they're really just much noisier single coils though.
#12
you can use capacitors before the hot leads on the pickups to reduce some treble, it's a trick I picked up from Gretsch or Rickenbacker guitars if memory serves me right, they used a switch and went between two capacitor values; but you can filter a pickup just like this diagram below. Not everyone has 100 or so capacitors laying around their house. Luckily electronics surplus stores exist.