#1
Alright so Im wanting to learn jazz, mostly instrumental side of it. I know next to nothing about it, but am beginning to get an ear for it. I like cats like Tal Farlow, Django Reinhardt, Herb Ellis, etc. My two favorite songs though are "Fly me to the moon" and "Youre getting to be a habit with me". The latter is great to listen to whilst cuddling on the couch with your best good-time-gal. LOL But I digress.

What are some good books that would have the basic jazz scales, progressions, inversions, how to improv, read lead sheets, etc. ?

PS

also at under 30 bucks. I aint paying gold prices for fretboard logic. this semester's books and tuition left me a bit strapped as of late.
Last edited by neptune1988 at Jan 29, 2016,
#2
Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine and Jazz Theory Resources by Bert Ligon. I don't know about the price, but I wouldn't really cheap out if I were you, a bad jazz book will probably do you more harm than good.
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Theory: Not rules, just tools.

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*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#3
Quote by Kevätuhri
Jazz Theory Book by Mark Levine and Jazz Theory Resources by Bert Ligon. I don't know about the price, but I wouldn't really cheap out if I were you, a bad jazz book will probably do you more harm than good.


+1.

Also Jazz Harmony by Andy Jaffe
#4
There are a lot of different styles of jazz guitar.... But at least you seem to have picked a number of artists you like.
Note that guys like Farlow and Reinhardt and Ellis all primarily played single-note lines (like a horn player) in conjunction with other musicians. With a combo or small orchestra.
Solo jazz guitar will have more chords and/or all chords..."Chord melody" playing. Ideally you've got the melody line (with a bit of improvisation) the harmony (chords) and a nice bass line all going at the same time.
#5
Quote by Bikewer
There are a lot of different styles of jazz guitar.... But at least you seem to have picked a number of artists you like.
Note that guys like Farlow and Reinhardt and Ellis all primarily played single-note lines (like a horn player) in conjunction with other musicians. With a combo or small orchestra.
Solo jazz guitar will have more chords and/or all chords..."Chord melody" playing. Ideally you've got the melody line (with a bit of improvisation) the harmony (chords) and a nice bass line all going at the same time.


you mean something more along the lines of this? (especially in the beginning)


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gIaseicCzFk
#6
Precisely. (Note that I didn't say these guys couldn't play solo..)
Farlow was an interesting dude... I read an article on him years ago in Guitar Player. One of those self-taught individuals who was able to figure out complex chord changes by listening to big-band recordings on the radio and on vinyl records.
Only problem was.... His chord "shapes" were often rather.... Unique, and when he began playing with other musicians they say... "Tal, that sounds great but what the hell are you doing there?"
#7
there is an overwhelming amount of information from many different sources,,it can be very confusing on where to begin..if price is a factor and im sure it is .. do some research on diatonic harmony...there is ample information online and it is the basic building block for ALL aspects of jazz..(and western music in general) the information it gives will be seen in almost every other approach to learning jazz..and music in general..
play well

wolf
#8
As is often the case, you should consider getting a good jazz guitar teacher. That aside, you need a 'Real book' which is a compendium of chord charts for almost every jazz standard there is.
#9
Quote by StuartBahn
As is often the case, you should consider getting a good jazz guitar teacher. That aside, you need a 'Real book' which is a compendium of chord charts for almost every jazz standard there is.


+1237843

Real books focus on melodies and the chords of a standard jazz chart, It will improve your sightreading, your chord work and how those two fit together. For instance, If you want to learn "Take Five" by the Dave Brubeck Quartet, the real book gives you the chords in that chart, plus the sax line. That being said, you still probably want to pick up one of the jazz theory books, my favorite being Jazz Theory Resources, as these will teach you how to MAKE jazz instead of how to PLAY jazz, like the Real Books do. If you want to dive into the scales and the chords of it and how to solo correctly over jazz (Which is a large part of it) Theory books will help. Getting a good jazz teacher will certainly help, but if you have the initiative, you can learn all of this by yourself.
#10
The jazz theory book is the one i would recommend, alongside getting a realbook.

However, since it is not mentioned in this thread yet i'd like to advice you to also start learning jazz directly from the source, the records. Learning from records is one of the things that will help you the most, it will will help you with picking up the swing-feel/articulation/phrasing and tone of jazz players. Also allowing you to learn tunes, harmonic and melodic concepts and phrases. The realbook is a great start, but eventually you want to learn jazz through the aural tradition of the music.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

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“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


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"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#11
when my grandma passed, God rest her, I inheritated her collection of big-band era records...would any of them help?
#13
I think any musician that wants to learn to play jazz should start by buying a real book and learning some of the chord progressions and melodies.

If you dont know where to start, learn the songs you recognize, the little one offs, like when you wish upon a star, it dont mean a thing if it aint got that swing, a few of my favorite things, and all the random big band tunes you might not recognize by name but you would by sound.

John Coltrane and Miles Davis are my two favorites.

Once you learn the basic idea, the basic chords and chord progressions, you can start learning how to improvise over those chord changes. To do that, you gotta know scales that coorespond to the chord extensions. For example, if the chord is a G7 b13, you could play the 5th mode of the C melodic minor scale (C D Eb F G A B) which would be G A B C D Eb F, thus forming a G7 b13 chord.

There are really only 4 scales, harmonic major, melodic minor, harmonic minor and the normal major scale. Sure there are a thousand scales, but these 4 are most relevant and pass the diatonic scale theory qualifications to make a "proper" scale.

Then you just gotta feel it out. You gotta have jazzy ideas in your head to play jazz. You can learn all the blues licks you want, but you cant play blues unless you have the blues.
#14
I'm currently trying to learn jazz too.It's a long slow process but it certainly improves your theory knowledge no end.I know more now in the last year than i have for the previous 19 years
It's a very daunting task but you just have to take it one small step at a time.Learning things like drop 2 chords and drop 3 chords and what to play over the extensions.Setting the metronome on beats two and four and trying to get the feel.
#15
Instead of doing that, I suggest you buy this album...

http://www.amazon.com/Ultimate-Wes-Montgomery/dp/B0000069NG

and get all the chord progressions down and copy as much of the solos as you can break down. Then practice arpeggios until you can do them in your sleep.

Books with scales and modes clutter up jazz IMO and make things much harder than they were intended to be.

Play off the chords skeletons and melody and use passing tones. Listen to Wes and see how he does that. Then, take the real book and apply it to other songs. IMHO, you really shouldn't even think of modes and scales and stuff like Mark Levine until you get that down ... which will take years.
Last edited by jogogonne at Mar 1, 2016,