#1
Hey Folks -

On Monday I will be traveling from coast to coast with my prized Carvin DC-400A. The guitar will be in a small U-Haul trailer. Putting it in the car is not an option. It has a bullet-proof Fender case. The guitar has always held its tune for amazingly long times and the neck is pin-straight. I don't want this to change!

Is it best with the guitar laying on its back, in an upright position, or on its side (the position it ends up in when you simply put it on the floor when carrying it by the case handle)?

The guitar has a Floyd Rose with a locking nut. Should I be detuning the strings? Should I loosen the locks on the nut?

Thanks in advance!
Carvin DC400A / Boss ME-50 / Cube Micro GX
#2
You can just leave it in tune and on its side if you wish. Which coast are you heading to?
#3
The travel itself shouldn't matter, because it is relatively a short time. It's possible your guitar will react to a new climate, but they way it's transported (assuming the transport is safe) shouldn't have any effect on that.
I don't give a shit if you listen to me or not
#4
Thanks to both of you for your input. Everything Google comes up with is airplane-specific. I'll also be giving it plenty of time to warm up once it's back indoors.

Quote by dspellman
You can just leave it in tune and on its side if you wish. Which coast are you heading to?

SoCal -> NY in the middle of winter.
Carvin DC400A / Boss ME-50 / Cube Micro GX
#5
Theoretically if you want to go overkill on safety detune everything a half-step down, but it's more for your feeling safe then anything concrete
#6
Quote by Hawt400A
Everything Google comes up with is airplane-specific.


And all of that is because baggage handlers will beat the shit out of your luggage. Assuming you handle the case yourself (or someone you trust to not throw it down a flight of stairs) you can eliminate a lot of the tips you'd get for transporting a guitar by air travel.
I don't give a shit if you listen to me or not
#8
Quote by Hawt400A
Thanks to both of you for your input. Everything Google comes up with is airplane-specific. I'll also be giving it plenty of time to warm up once it's back indoors.


SoCal -> NY in the middle of winter.


You might want to pull it out of the car/trunk/trailer at night and take it inside, particularly if the temps are hitting serious lows. But leave it in the case. I have a friend who travels with her guitar occasionally, and she surrounds it with pillows ("it's like a big down comforter -- whatever temperature changes are going to take place are going to do so SLOWLY").
#9
Quote by viennasunsetb
Flight cases are expensive, but are a worthy investment. They last forever and protect the shit out of your gear!


I have flight cases for a few of my guitars. Real Ones. Anvils.
The downside is that they're big and bulky and brutal (to anything else packed around them).



The design is important. Mine are NOT designed to have neck cradles and the like. Those designs break guitars. Mine just have soft and hard foam components (with some interior wood to contain that) and the guitar moves slightly, but as one object. The ones that have neck cradles are tough on set neck guitars (I have no idea what they do to bolt-necks). The neck is locked in and then you have this dense, heavy body that's got a bit more movement available due to NOT being locked in. The foam also serves to delay temperature changes.

Mine have the rotating hasps that allow small padlocks to be attached, and gaffer's tape covers them and keeps them from being sheared off during handling.



One thing I DO advise, however, is that if you have any type of case that's *tight* on the neck (that pushes the strings down onto the frets): put a piece of thin hard plastic between the strings and the frets. Fender, Suhr and ESP ship their premium guitars with these things, and you can find replacements for about $10 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/bestparts-guitar-fret-guard-fender-esp-suhr-type-480mm-/271815322785 ) or make your own. Vibration transmitted from outside the case will actually use the strings to grind your frets (have you ever seen a fret with the winds from the wound string embedded in a dent?).

Last edited by dspellman at Jan 31, 2016,
#10
put one of the humidifier packs in the case. You are going from a dry climate to a more humid climate. The temperature difference is also potentially an issue, but I have never experienced this with any of my guitars and I have traveled in the middle of summer and in winter for weeks at a time on tour with my PRS and several other guitars in regular cases in the trailer.
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2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
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#11
So I made the move - successfully! I left my guitar in tune in its Fender case and threw it in the trailer standing on end. While we drove through a snow storm, the trailer was kind of like having your car in a garage - even though it's not heated, it's certainly not like leaving it out in the driveway.

After arriving on the east coast, I let the guitar sit at room temperature for a few days without even opening it. My guitar has always been very good at staying in tune, even with the Floyd Rose. Sure enough, when I finally took it out, there was exactly one string out of tune!

Thanks for the input!
Carvin DC400A / Boss ME-50 / Cube Micro GX
#12
I've transported my guitar as checked baggage inside a soft backpack, with the neck detached from the body so it could fit, back and forth from Frankfurt to Taipei through Beijing, the guitar itself didn't have its own bag, surprisingly it's still fine, however I wouldn't try that with a guitar I really care about, it was just a Squier Strat

that guitar is like falling in love with a stripper
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