#1
Hi, I've been playing for about a month, and I'm fiddling with my guitar position. I'm trying to figure out the best angle of the guitar with respect to my body. When I look at videos of instructors who hold the guitar in the normal position (in my case, on my right leg for right-handed strumming), they seem to hold the guitar almost parallel to their body. I have a high-volume dreadnaught, and it's quite a reach over the top of the guitar if I want to get my palm close to the strings, and it puts strain on my right shoulder. I find it much more comfortable if I angle the guitar neck forward, perhaps 30 degrees or so. That allows the guitar to neatly tuck under my arm, and there's no strain on my shoulder.

I'm guessing that the answer is going to be something along the lines of "do whatever works best for you", but as a beginner, I'd like to know what other people do, and what the trade-offs are, if any.

Thanks!
#3
Wrong section. Try the Guitar Techniques section.

I'll give you my $0.02 before you go off. Yeah, do whatever works for you. There are trade-offs to improve your technique and there are "proper" ways to hold your guitar, but none of that helps you if you're uncomfortable.
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#5
I think angling the neck forward a bit would be okay because it doesn't really change the way your wrist has to be positioned.


What you don't want is for the neck to be pointing down towards the floor. That makes it really hard to play but some beginners tend to do this because they have trouble seeing their fingers on the fret board.
#6
The most "correct" position is classical style: the side of the guitar body resting on left leg, the tail end of the guitar supported by the right leg, angled upward a little. Preferably with something to prop your left foot on so it's a little higher.




It does make things easier to play and gives better posture, but do whatever feels best. I usually just rest it on my right leg. This causes me to hunch over a little bit, but I have bad posture in general. When I play like this with an acoustic my arm at the bicep area right above the bend of my elbow is resting on the side of the guitar, which puts my hand in the right position without causing strain on my right shoulder. When playing electric guitars in a seated position it's similar, but my forearm is making contact with the side of the guitar. I also noticed that I actually let the weight of my arm rest on the guitar when I'm fingerpicking, which mainly what I do on acoustics, but when I use a pick I don't. Never noticed any discomfort either way.


I would think that angling the neck farther away from your body would cause more tension on the left arm from being extended further and result in faster fatigue. Try relaxing your right arm (and everything else) as much as you can. Tension is always the enemy when playing guitar. It's might be that your right arm is overly tense, resulting in strain on your shoulder. It's also possible the guitar may be too big for you. Dreadnought style guitars are usually the biggest and I've seen my nephew try to play mine before and it was obvious that it was too large for him to find a comfortable way to hold it.
#7
classical position definitely helps, give it a shot. if you have a strap you can try playing standing up as well. overtime as you build muscle you'll get more accustomed to it and it'll be more flexible.

but yeah, just find what works for now. if things start hurting (beyond fingertip callous pain i guess) then try to adjust until it's comfortable
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#8
Quote by chrismendiola
Wrong section. Try the Guitar Techniques section.

Ok, I'll repost this under Guitar Techniques.

Thanks for the feedback, folks. I'll save any further discussion for the guitar techniques section.