#1
So I just posted a similar request in the electric guitar section too : )
Apologies for the annoying question.
I have back problems and am hoping to find a very light and good sounding bass
for around $600 or under (used or new)
It's just for casual home recording and jamming but I still want it to be a solid bass/sound.

Thanks in advance!
And cool forums here.
#3
Anything made for the Japanese market. Generally smaller frames so smaller and lighter basses. Yamaha are great, like Ben said, and so are Ibanez and (some) ESP/LTD.

It might be a bit of a compromise in tone, depending on what you're after, but a short scale might be in order. Squier make a VM Mustang bass which is fucking great and Warwick make a short scale Rockbass Corvette which will do pretty much any tone you want.

Also, I won't pry into what your back problems are but a few years ago I switched to a lighter bass (from a Squier VM Jazz V, 1 metric ton) because of some back problems. I found a squishy and wide strap and more focus on posture (and playing sat down at every opportunity too, knee problems too) helped a great deal and I was able to go back to the heavier basses that I love.
Last edited by Spaz91 at Feb 1, 2016,
#4
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Yamaha RBX4A2 should be well within your budget. Very, very light.

Interesting thanks.
I'm reading some reviews and it says good overall but the action usually needs some work.
And it's got a bit of a guitar hero look going : )
But I will look into it more.
#5
Quote by Spaz91
Anything made for the Japanese market. Generally smaller frames so smaller and lighter basses. Yamaha are great, like Ben said, and so are Ibanez and (some) ESP/LTD.

It might be a bit of a compromise in tone, depending on what you're after, but a short scale might be in order. Squier make a VM Mustang bass which is fucking great and Warwick make a short scale Rockbass Corvette which will do pretty much any tone you want.

Also, I won't pry into what your back problems are but a few years ago I switched to a lighter bass (from a Squier VM Jazz V, 1 metric ton) because of some back problems. I found a squishy and wide strap and more focus on posture (and playing sat down at every opportunity too, knee problems too) helped a great deal and I was able to go back to the heavier basses that I love.


Can you suggest some specific models in the Yamaha, Ibanez and ESP ranges?
A short scale might be interesting because I'm rarely going into the higher ranges.
Why can it be a compromise in tone?
Thanks for your input.
#6
Quote by third_address
Interesting thanks.
I'm reading some reviews and it says good overall but the action usually needs some work.
And it's got a bit of a guitar hero look going : )
But I will look into it more.


In reviews, whenever someone mentions action, 9/10 they don't realise that action is a preference based thing. You should always have your new instrument set up to how you like it, as what comes out of the factory probably isn't that.
#7
Quote by third_address
Can you suggest some specific models in the Yamaha, Ibanez and ESP ranges?

With Yamaha you definitely want the RBX series like Ben said, with Ibanez you want the SR series (the Sr500 should fit your budget and its a go-to for a lot of people) and for ESP/LTD I personally recommend the B or D series because it's a bit less pointy and try hard. I had one of their discontinued D series and it was pretty sweet.

A short scale changes the tone because there is less tension on the strings. With a poor setup or overly light strings this can sound a bit boomy and rubbery. When it's done properly though, it can sound really damn good. You can hear the difference pretty clearly in this video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N5U_dO9jZtM

(I would definitely recommend the Mustang of over the Jaguar though.)
#9
Thanks for your helpful suggestions.
I will keep an eye out for used and new in my area.
And keep the suggestions coming as I'm sure others will benefit from the thread.
#10
I have a 1st gen Fender Dimension that plays fantastic, is lightweight, and sounds great. It looks similar to an Ibby SR.

"Quick to judge. Quick to anger. Slow to understand. Ignorance and prejudice and fear walk hand-in-hand."
- Rush, "Witch Hunt"
#12
Unfortunately, my only knowledge of the differing main bass brands and what is decent arises from my old colleague that teaches others bass and works in a band currently.
#14
Quote by ad_works
ibanez Mikro 5?


I'm mainly interested in 4-string full body basses.
But thanks for the input anyways.
#16
Ibanez Mikro basses are available in 4 string too and they're probably going to be the lightest bass on the market BUT be aware they are the lowest tier in terms of parts and QC. Think same quality as a Squier Bronco.
#17
If you're going for light weight and have back problems, pack away a bit more money and talk to the folks at Carvin about the Vader headless basses. The full 34" bass is 8 lbs, the 30" short scale less than that, and they're available in 4, 5, and 6-string models with and without active pickups, etc. Unfortunately, base price is $1199 for these guitars, though you may be able to find one used...

http://www.carvinguitars.com/catalog/guitars/vb4



Standard basses weigh in at least a pound and a half heavier (9.5 pounds). A standard 34" scale bass will be about 45" long, while the headless 30" is only around 35" overall (the 34" scale headless is around 38"). The extra length of a standard bass can sometimes aggravate back issues when you have to reach.
Last edited by dspellman at Feb 7, 2016,
#18
Wow, very little heft to those basses

$1200?!? Yeaaaaaaaaaaaah, I'll pass lol Unfortunately, I'm sort of stingy with prices on guitars, but if I find a quality one, I won't mind paying more for it. That being said, playability over looks ANY day.

Yeah, I can see what you mean, Spaz, with the quality on the 4-stringer Ibanez.

-Sharky
#19
Quote by CherokeShredder
Wow, very little heft to those basses

$1200?!? Yeaaaaaaaaaaaah, I'll pass lol Unfortunately, I'm sort of stingy with prices on guitars, but if I find a quality one, I won't mind paying more for it. That being said, playability over looks ANY day.



You've obviously never played a Carvin.
You can easily option them out to $2K and more, but even in base configuration these are some of the best playing guitars and basses you'll run into. Build quality is exceptional. There are other, far more expensive basses: Dingwalls that run $15K and up, for example.
This Dingwall is marked down to $12500: http://www.basscentral.com/pdimages/2014/BLOWUPS%202014/DINGWALLPRIMAARTISTWALNUT4719.html

Looks *and* playability are a very nice combination.

The TS was looking for something with LESS heft ("I have back problems and am hoping to find a very light and good sounding bass").
#20
Yep, that is true. I don't have a bass of my own and never have, but I have certainly spent time playing others' quite a bit, so I know how they work. Just not any technical stuff. See, it would be ridiculous to me for me to spend more than $1-2k on a guitar, but that is just me xD

Eh, fair enough with the looks and playability combo. I just disregard looks a bit more as long as I can tell about playing, which is usually first to notice.

I saw that before, and I stated that the basses that you posted were with little to no heft to them, which worked with what TS stated

-Sharky
#21
It's a pretty good attitude to have. Remember the majority of guitars are just machine made bits of wood and metal so there's rarely a good reason to spend more. I've been playing for a decade now and the basses I've owned have varied from £20 to £2500 (at today's prices at least) and I've found myself settling in the £200-£300 range because why the fuck not? I think John Swift (who will weigh in at some point) has been playing several times as long and uses a Squier Affinity series as his main bass.

The only real exception to this does include Carvin though. There's nothing quite like an instrument that has been made specifically for you and you will notice the difference. Personally though, I'd rather spend the money building one myself though.
#22
Altogether, I'd say I've played lead and rhythm guitar for the full 8-9 years of playing guitar and about 2-3 varied years of bass work altogether. Honestly, I've done fine with guitars that were priced for less than $300-400 or so. That's just me, though :P

I still need to research more into bass or ask my colleague who is an actual bassist whereas I CAN play bass, but don't do much of it.

Personally, playability will always trump looks/visuals

-Sharky