#1
I just got a new esp ltd b205sm 5 string in the mail yesterday

the action is just a little too low for my liking and I want to raise the action just a little bit

I have a gig on sunday so I want to know if theres a way to fix this myself while

avoiding replacing strings, taking it to a shop, or any lengthy amount of work done to

the bass

I checked youtube for video help but it varied a lot so I want a solid opinion
#2
I want to know if theres a way to fix this myself while avoiding replacing strings, taking it to a shop, or any lengthy amount of work done to the bass

I'm afraid you'll have to take it to the shop, replace the strings, buy a new bridge, shim the neck, and proceed to throw it in the fireplace. Expect to pay Guitar Center around $300. Expect them to fail at it miserably.


Seriously, just adjust the bridge. It isn't rocket science. All you need is an allen wrench that fits the screws which adjust the action of each individual string. Paying someone to do something that simple is dumb.

Make sure to adjust each saddle by the same amount you adjusted the last one though, or else you'll misadjust the string radius and thus the action from string to string will not be consistent with the fretboard radius.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Feb 3, 2016,
#3
lol

so just the string saddle on the bridge and nothing with the truss rod? im afraid of opening it up cuz im a clutz (duh I play bass)
#4
Quote by mykahgump777
lol

so just the string saddle on the bridge and nothing with the truss rod? im afraid of opening it up cuz im a clutz (duh I play bass)

It depends on if the amount of releif the neck has is actually correct. Measure it.

http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-check-your-guitars-neck-relief.html

Adjusting the truss rod is something you need to learn to do yourself if you want the bass to play consistently. There really isn't anything to be afraid of. Just use a bit of common sense. Make sure the allen wrench you use is the right size. You won't need to adjust it very much to make a big difference.

How much releif you should have is down to personal preference. 0.5mm at the 7th fret is good for most players. Some might want more, others might want less.
Quote by TheSennaj
And well yes, I'll enjoy the carpal tunnel and tendonitis, because trying to get one is clearly smarter than any word you have spoken thus far.
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Feb 3, 2016,
#5
ok thanks a ton guys it was really helpful
just stressed out cuz I usually would have it done by a guy at gc
#6
One additional tip: Pay attention to the fingerboard radius. Most fingerboards are not perfectly flat from side to side - there is an arc. When you adjust the bridge saddles to raise or lower each string, make sure the overall arc of the strings from side to side matches the arc of the neck.