#1
i know its a stupid question but im just wondering will it sound like a neck single coil? is it the position that makes the neck sound so much warmer then the bridge? or the way the pickups are built? i would also only be able to put at an angle so itd be an angled neck pickup.
its a fat 50's bridge
#2
Yeah, it'll sound like a neck pickup. The difference between neck and bridge pickups, when there is one, is that the bridge has a higher output to compensate for the lower amplitude of string vibration right by the bridge. Having it angled or straight shouldn't make a significant difference in the neck position.
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#4
I've used strat pickguards where the bridge is angled the opposite direction and I didn't hear a noticeable difference in tone. The angle doesn't seem to have a large effect, I think the reason strats (and their copies) still have the angled bridge is more for looks than anything.
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#5
Quote by GuitarNewbee
i know its a stupid question but im just wondering will it sound like a neck single coil? is it the position that makes the neck sound so much warmer then the bridge? or the way the pickups are built? i would also only be able to put at an angle so itd be an angled neck pickup.
its a fat 50's bridge


It's the position. Originally (up until the '80's), all pickups on a guitar were the same (random exceptions). It's the position that makes the neck pickup sound warmer and louder. An angled neck pickup won't make much difference, but an angled bridge pickup will, due to its location very close to the bridge.
#6
If anything, it'll sound a bit more like a neck pickup. The more you overwind a pickup, the hotter it gets and the more treble is lost. Bridge pickups in matched sets are wound hotter because the string energy is lower the closer you get to the bridge. Many sets are also designed so that the neck pickup is more receptive to treble since there's not as much available in that position.

So if you took a matched set of strat pickups and reversed them, rather than getting a neck pickup that sounds like a bridge and vice versa, you'd get even more contrast. The bridge pickup would sound really bright and the neck really bass heavy. The output levels wouldn't be very well matched either.

This only really applies when you're trying to balance a set of pickups with each other. If you're mixing and matching, you can put anything in any position. You just want to consider the effect that position will have on that pickup and how to balance it with your other pickup choices.

So for this one, if you're going with a fairly vintage wind (maybe even medium output) fat 50 in the neck, you may want to balance it out with a medium to high output bridge pickup. personally, I love the SD Quarter Pounder as a Strat bridge.
#7
Quote by Stickymongoose


So if you took a matched set of strat pickups and reversed them, rather than getting a neck pickup that sounds like a bridge and vice versa, you'd get even more contrast. The bridge pickup would sound really bright and the neck really bass heavy. The output levels wouldn't be very well matched either.

This only really applies when you're trying to balance a set of pickups with each other. If you're mixing and matching, you can put anything in any position. You just want to consider the effect that position will have on that pickup and how to balance it with your other pickup choices.


I have a DiMarzio Fast Track II (normally a very "hot" bridge position single-coil size humbucker) in the neck position of an LP. It's an 18K pickup. Bridge pickup in this guitar is a standard humbucker-size but fairly hot '57 (9.2K). The neck pickup isn't bass heavy, actually, but it is clearer for bottom end, in part due to the smaller size of the magnetic field. It's definitely a monster for leads, and it's definitely a lot louder than the bridge pickup. I see that as a positive; I've never been a big fan of "balanced" pickups. I think they're a manufacturer construct begun in the late '80's that no one ever really questioned.