#1
Hi, everyone

Say that I play C, D, G again and again and I want to shift up so it sound different how do I do that?

Does that shift up call chorus, right?

Some of you (Like the other post I posted) might suggest me to get a guitar class.
I did now and my teacher just teach me to play a song -.- He said that I'll be able to play music. What I've learn so far now is strum pattern and not thing much.
Now I'm thinking about quitting the class.

Thank for the help, and sorry English is not my first language.

Side note: I've been play for over a year, changing chord and keep time with the rhythm is not a problem anymore. (I just want to write a song and know some music theory but no good school teach me that )
#2
Chorus is the catchy part of a song (for example in AC/DC's Highway to Hell it's the part where they sing "I'm on a highway to hell"). I think the word you are looking for is modulation or key change.

Learn about chord functions. C-D-G is most likely in the key of G and it's a IV-V-I progression. You can play a IV-V-I progression in any key. The Roman numerals refer to the scale degrees the chords are built on. C is the 4th note of G major, D is the 5th, G is the first. To play that progression in other keys, just find the 4th, 5th and 1st notes of the scale and play major chords built on those notes. For example in the key of D major a IV-V-I progression would be G-A-D because G is the 4th note of D major, A is the 5th note and D is the first note of the scale. You can do the same thing in any key.


Remember that you don't need to modulate to change your chord progression. If your first chord progression uses C, D and G major chords, maybe use other chords from the same key in the next chord progression. Or play them in another order.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Feb 12, 2016,
#3
I think you're thinking of "modulation", or a key change. The simplest way to do it is to just take the same chords and patterns and shift the up (or down) two frets or any amount of frets you like. So let's say you have C-Dm-G which is in C major. You could then play D-Em-A, the G chord doesn't sound horrible before the D since they're in the same key, which now happens to be D major. I suggest you learn about keys and diatonic chords.

And if I had a student whos been playing for a year, songs and strumming patterns are probably exactly what I would teach. But if you have a problem with that, speak to your teacher and ask him to reconsider the content of the lessons.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
Last edited by Kevätuhri at Feb 12, 2016,
#4
Kev and Marine took all the words I was going to use for an explanation basically D: I second their statements, though

-Sharky
#5
Remember that you don't need to modulate to change your chord progression. If your first chord progression uses C, D and G major chords, maybe use other chords from the same key in the next chord progression. Or play them in another order.

Uh, huh, I just made it. [C, D] G 4/4 then C, D, G 4/4 or D, C, G 4/4, But I'm having a problem to end the song. How do I know which chord to end this progression. I don't want to use G.

Let say I made a modulation D, C .... but I don't want it to end with G because it's sound the same. Is there anyway I can know how to end it with a beautiful sound?

And if I had a student whose been playing for a year, songs and strumming patterns are probably exactly what I would teach. But if you have a problem with that, speak to your teacher and ask him to reconsider the content of the lessons.


I spend one year as a self taught guitarist and play most of the song from Metallica and other metal/hard rock band and I nail it.

I just take this guitar class about 3 day ago for music theory and the teacher recognize that I can play well so he skip me the basic scale and chord, but I didn't like the class that much because he just teach me the strumming pattern on Acoustic and let me play that same song over and over -.-
#6
Oh no no no no no. That is very bad, to me. ALWAYS review and make sure, confirm through much practice and training, that one is ready for the more advanced stuff. I'd be ashamed of my own tutor/teacher status if I just skipped willy nilly, regardless of ability of students
#7
Quote by CherokeShredder
Oh no no no no no. That is very bad, to me. ALWAYS review and make sure, confirm through much practice and training, that one is ready for the more advanced stuff. I'd be ashamed of my own tutor/teacher status if I just skipped willy nilly, regardless of ability of students


I review everything. I just play the guitar 4/5 hour a day without hurting my finger anymore.
#8
Well, that is very good, mang. That's about the range I do usually, spaced out of course heh doesn't help the timing, that I also tab a lot of songs during that span too ^_^
#9
Quote by CherokeShredder
Well, that is very good, mang. That's about the range I do usually, spaced out of course heh doesn't help the timing, that I also tab a lot of songs during that span too ^_^


I think I'm not a guitar enthusiastic. I just love music. I love good sound from instrument and I love a good compose song. I give more credit to instrument than the lyrics of the song.

My teacher just give me a 3 pops song and I don't like pop much because they doesn't sound pleasant to my ear. That why I want to write a song like the Beatles or maybe close enough to Metallica. I don't care if I can play music or not.
#10
There is really no secret formula to writing a good chord progression. You need to use your ears. Try different chords and use the ones that you like the sound of. That's how you do it. If you don't want to end it with G major, end it with some other chord. Try different chords. Try the chords in the key of G major first. You may also use chords from G minor. That's quite common. Or you can change the key. But I would first try to stay inside the key. You really can't understand modulation before you understand how diatonic harmony works.

Also, remember that chords alone don't usually sound good. To make a chord progression sound good, you need to have some kind of a rhythm. Also, your chord voicings are important too. And obviously if you have no melody, just playing chords one after another usually sounds boring.


One thing is experimenting with a commonly used chord progression like Em-C-D-G or something like that. That's an easy chord progression to write melodies over. That's why so many songs use that progression - it just feels natural and it naturally fits so many melodies.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Feb 12, 2016,
#11
I experiment with different rhythm and I choose bolero. I think I should learn about diatonic harmonic as you suggest first and then learn about modulation later.

I still having a hard time playing song by ear because they're too many chords and too many of them are sound differently.
#12
If you want to stay inside one key, there are just seven different chords to choose from (in G major G Am Bm C D Em and F#dim). Start with those. Use the ones that you like the sound of.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#13
google the Nashville number system and learn it. Then google popular chord progressions.

Learning how to create chord progressions requires some knowledge of music theory. So if you are just begining to learn music theory i would reccomend learning the major scale and how it is constructed. After that learn how individual chords are constructed (major and minor)
#14
Quote by cav22s
google the Nashville number system and learn it. Then google popular chord progressions.

Learning how to create chord progressions requires some knowledge of music theory. So if you are just begining to learn music theory i would reccomend learning the major scale and how it is constructed. After that learn how individual chords are constructed (major and minor)


Cav is spot on if you want to fast track to writing your own songs. This will show you what chords sound good together and help with stringing them together into a song. To write a chorus or any section of song just change your progression around.

There's nothing wrong with writing songs when you've only been playing for a year but they are not going to sound as good as you want it to without learning the basics about strumming, picking, and dynamics. I think as a beginner we focus on our fretting hand more in the beginning until we realize all the fine details we need to be aware of with our picking hand. So it sounds like your guitar teacher is teaching you the right things and what he's showing you is helping you in songwriting as well, even though you may not see that part right now.
#15
Learn about the key. What you're saying can be interpreted in a number of ways. It could be modulation. If you play your progression up a half step, that will sound like a gear change for sure. But the chorus of songs also often feels kind of up at a higher level of excitement, which could be a key change (modulation) or not.
#16
Quote by cav22s
google the Nashville number system and learn it. Then google popular chord progressions.

Learning how to create chord progressions requires some knowledge of music theory. So if you are just begining to learn music theory i would reccomend learning the major scale and how it is constructed. After that learn how individual chords are constructed (major and minor)


Personally I find the roman numerals a much better system, because they include the tonality of the chord in the number. For written purposes. For spoken purposes, they are the same.
#17
I've learnt that Nasvhille number system. I sometime compose a great song with rythms.
Thank for your help.

It's look like composing a song is depend on many factor such as feeling, emotion, places and environment.