#1
Hey guys, I've been playing guitar for a few years (3 1/2), playing jazz/fusion/rock/soul/indie/etc, and I have seen myself grow as a musician, but one area I seem to lack in is animating my progressions/solo's etc. By animating I mean creating a strong visual for the listener. When I listen to my favorite artists I can create a vivid visual of their personalities, but I feel as if I am not able to make riffs and licks in such a fashion. Does anybody have any advice on this? Obviously there is the probability that I am over thinking this, however, I thought i'd poke your guy's brains lol.
#3
Quote by jerrykramskoy
Why visual? Why noy aural or surely more importantly, emotional response?


You have a good point, however, when I feel emotional about something strong visuals tend to follow.
#4
Thing is ... you say you want to impact your listener, and different folk react very differently. For example. sound people talk about "It looks to me like ...", whereas others may say "it sounds to me like ...", or "feels to me like ... IN other words, not eveyone is visually driven. But, short of brain injury or illness, everyone's emotional network functions strongly, havinga lot to do with our behaviour.

Do you really mean you want a listener to conjure up mental imagery as a result of listening to your music? I have no clue how to do that ... but I do know how to create emotional response from my music (good and bad!)

Or do you mean you want to visually appealing to an audience?
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Feb 14, 2016,
#5
You see music as visual. This is a good thing assuming you dont have perfect pitch, where you see and identify notes as you would with colors. Try listening to some 20th century a-tonal type music, or even movie scores. Those evoke real visual feelings. You can study those and emulate them in your playing. Otherwise, I consider the ability to see an actual distraction from playing music. Look at Stevie Wonder. His eyes are closed all the time, and he feels the beat, the timing and the emotion. He can't get distracted by his eyes.

As far as evoking those feelings in solos, i urge you to sing your solo. Play as if you would sing. The greatest solo-players of any time have conceived them vocally (ex. miles davis, chet baker, oscar peterson actually sings his crazy solos--->https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NTJhHn-TuDY) and that's where the feeling comes from, as if the instrument is speaking to you. hope that helps!
#6
Program music.

Not everyone has the same musical background, and few, if any, will perceive any one piece of music the exact way you do.
Glad to cross paths with you on this adventure called life
Quote by Jet Penguin
lots of flirting with the other key without confirming. JUST LIKE THEIR LOVE IN THE MOVIE OH DAMN.
Quote by Hail
you're acting like you have perfect pitch or something
#7
Quote by jerrykramskoy
Thing is ... you say you want to impact your listener, and different folk react very differently. For example. sound people talk about "It looks to me like ...", whereas others may say "it sounds to me like ...", or "feels to me like ... IN other words, not eveyone is visually driven. But, short of brain injury or illness, everyone's emotional network functions strongly, havinga lot to do with our behaviour.

Do you really mean you want a listener to conjure up mental imagery as a result of listening to your music? I have no clue how to do that ... but I do know how to create emotional response from my music (good and bad!)

Or do you mean you want to visually appealing to an audience?


Maybe I stated my perception incorrectly. When I say visual I mean I feel a sense of energy that overpowers traditional emotion, in the sense that it overloads my senses so that I feel like I can hear the music in sight, smell, feel, and obviously the aural perception. This I feel, creates the general essence of the artist, so that I can recognize their playing instantly. When I think of my artists I can feel colors that cooperate with their music, and can breathe the air that they breathe for a while. I'm not sure how to truley explain it.
#8
Quote by slap-a-bass
You see music as visual. This is a good thing assuming you dont have perfect pitch, where you see and identify notes as you would with colors. Try listening to some 20th century a-tonal type music, or even movie scores. Those evoke real visual feelings. You can study those and emulate them in your playing. Otherwise, I consider the ability to see an actual distraction from playing music. Look at Stevie Wonder. His eyes are closed all the time, and he feels the beat, the timing and the emotion. He can't get distracted by his eyes.

As far as evoking those feelings in solos, i urge you to sing your solo. Play as if you would sing. The greatest solo-players of any time have conceived them vocally (ex. miles davis, chet baker, oscar peterson actually sings his crazy solos--->https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NTJhHn-TuDY) and that's where the feeling comes from, as if the instrument is speaking to you. hope that helps!


It has helped in some respect, but it's not great all the time. This means that I tend to become captured in the music, i'm a minimalist, so I try to convey vibe more than my general sense of theory (a mix of passive and active listening i guess) , but I am in college for it :/, and i guess i will have to close my eyes more then
I have been studying messiaens modes of limited transposition, but have been having a hard time finding its application with guitar. As for atonality I have used matrix's before, but its too mathematical. I tend to keep the math to the audio engineering side, and let the music just flow.

I sing in my solo's but shred whenever there's gain lol so that's something I gotta limit. Thank you for your time!
#9
Quote by NeoMvsEu
Program music.

Not everyone has the same musical background, and few, if any, will perceive any one piece of music the exact way you do.


true, but then how can some people recognize similar colors in one piece. Or how can people sync acid trips at dead shows. I call it nature, but some call it nonsense (or magic).
#10
Cultural exposure and the power of crowd frenzy.
Glad to cross paths with you on this adventure called life
Quote by Jet Penguin
lots of flirting with the other key without confirming. JUST LIKE THEIR LOVE IN THE MOVIE OH DAMN.
Quote by Hail
you're acting like you have perfect pitch or something
#11
Quote by NeoMvsEu
Cultural exposure and the power of crowd frenzy.


Good points
#12
Quote by ja3k3l
Maybe I stated my perception incorrectly. When I say visual I mean I feel a sense of energy that overpowers traditional emotion, in the sense that it overloads my senses so that I feel like I can hear the music in sight, smell, feel, and obviously the aural perception. This I feel, creates the general essence of the artist, so that I can recognize their playing instantly. When I think of my artists I can feel colors that cooperate with their music, and can breathe the air that they breathe for a while. I'm not sure how to truley explain it.


Wow ... I've never experienced all of that tpgether listening to music.

All I can suggest is to see if you can figure out whether it's note choice, rhythm, phrasing, technique (including dressing up notes, vibrato, slides, harmonics ...) that's really causing this for you ... rather than the overall combination. Hone in on that for yourself? But as stated above, pretty everyone reacts differently to a degree.

The one thing thaty is obvious from large gigs is that it's rhythm and energy in the band that does have a common, massive effect on the audience. Scarily so.
#13
Not sure exactly what you're alluding to, but I would recommend studying players like Stevie Ray Vaughan - where's it's like 90% articulation and emotion. Jeff Beck and Mark Knopfler are great studies in phrasing as well.

You cannot fake your way through an SRV tune - it just doesn't work.
#14
Well, it all starts with making it sound good. After it sounds good, you focus on making it original. This isn't really something you can be told how to do, it just takes experience.
#15
Also, you aren't talking about synesthesia are you? I have a mild form where I see letters and numbers in color and subconsciously designate masculine and feminine characteristics to numbers, but it's pretty rare to strongly associate notes with colors or visuals, without being on drugs.
#16
Quote by jerrykramskoy
Wow ... I've never experienced all of that tpgether listening to music.

All I can suggest is to see if you can figure out whether it's note choice, rhythm, phrasing, technique (including dressing up notes, vibrato, slides, harmonics ...) that's really causing this for you ... rather than the overall combination. Hone in on that for yourself? But as stated above, pretty everyone reacts differently to a degree.

The one thing thaty is obvious from large gigs is that it's rhythm and energy in the band that does have a common, massive effect on the audience. Scarily so.


I have considered phrasing to the key but have never really thought about rhythm being a key element to visualizations. You have enlightened me, thank you! I guess I will have to spend time listening to music and finding drum instrumentation that creates the vibe I want.
#17
Quote by jlowe22
Also, you aren't talking about synesthesia are you? I have a mild form where I see letters and numbers in color and subconsciously designate masculine and feminine characteristics to numbers, but it's pretty rare to strongly associate notes with colors or visuals, without being on drugs.


Maybe in some form, but nothing to where i actually see colors. Before guitar I was a visual artist, everytime i listened to music I tried to create an image in my head and would then recreate it on paper, I guess that ability still crosses over to music. What you see sounds awesome! I've never heard of the masculine and feminine characteristics with music, super interesting!
#18
Quote by reverb66
Not sure exactly what you're alluding to, but I would recommend studying players like Stevie Ray Vaughan - where's it's like 90% articulation and emotion. Jeff Beck and Mark Knopfler are great studies in phrasing as well.

You cannot fake your way through an SRV tune - it just doesn't work.


I play too much blues now, i have to stem away into other waters, great advice though! When i listen to srv I get hear the ruggedness and cowboy essence he has, I am really trying to manipulate that essence so that I can craft how much music is perceived.
#19
Quote by ja3k3l
I have considered phrasing to the key but have never really thought about rhythm being a key element to visualizations. You have enlightened me, thank you! I guess I will have to spend time listening to music and finding drum instrumentation that creates the vibe I want.


It's not just rhythm expressed on drums. Any instrument (including voice). Remember rhythm is about the placement and duration of sounds in time (and hence where silence occurs, which breaks the flow to create phrasing (this is a simplistic view, but ...)