#1
I am new here as well. Like many others I have been playing for years, but never actually concentrated on it. I can learn by ear, play a lot of songs and have played bass in bands and on stage. I played bass like many others that found it easier to to attain a competent level than with a guitar, besides the fact that is is just so damn cool to rock that bottom end. I also took middle school saxophone a lifetime ago that still benefits me.

I am at the point now where I want to become a good guitar player. I am trying to learn the fret board, practicing scales, modes, learning theory and working on technique. There are tons of ways to learn and I am feeling a little overwhelmed by the amount of info there is and directions to go. I want to clean up my rhythm playing and be able to solo. I feel I am not very far from those goals if I put in the work. My goal is the pick up the instrument and not be embarrassed by my peers!

If you had an hour a day how would you design a practice regiment for maximum use of time? Thank you!
Last edited by baddarryl at Feb 14, 2016,
#2
Quote by baddarryl
I am new here as well. Like many others I have been playing for years, but never actually concentrated on it. I can learn by ear, play a lot of songs and have played bass in bands and on stage. I played bass like many others that found it easier to to attain a competent level than with a guitar. I also took middle school saxophone a lifetime ago that still benefits me.

I am at the point now where I want to become a good guitar player. I am trying to learn the fret board, practicing scales, modes, learning theory and working on technique. There are tons of ways to learn and I am feeling a little overwhelmed by the amount of info there is and directions to go. I want to clean up my rhythm playing and be able to solo. I feel I am not very far from those goals if I put in the work. My goal is the pick up the instrument and not be embarrassed by my peers!

If you had an hour a day how would you design a practice regiment for maximum use of time? Thank you!


Actually you're doing most of the important things. I would add:

1) Improvise. You don't need to know a lot of scales to do that, minor pentatonic is already enough. Just do it. Find a backing track in A minor on YouTube and trash the minor pentatonic. Don't just run up and down the scale or play progressions. Make melodies, take breaks and use bends. The aim is not to learn the scale - you're already doing that - but to learn how to improvise.

2) Choose a song you like that is slightly above your present level of competence, and learn it, from start to finish. After that, learn another, a little more difficult.

I think if you add these 2 things to what you're already doing will help you go far.
#3
Personally, if i had an hour to only practice i would:
30 minutes- Work on scales and improvising
30 minutes- Work on composing a song

However, i would advise a complete beginner to just spend the entire hour learning one of their favorite songs. When i first started i spent hours on end learning my favorite songs. Not only does this get your fingers in shape, but you have something to show off to people
Last edited by J23L at Feb 14, 2016,
#4
whatever you play, play to a click track. Set yourself deadlines, record and re-listen to your rhythm, and clearness of tone, time and touch (3 T's). Personally, i could never get myself to do this, so now im in school where i have actual deadlines for lets say an improv class or performance class and am making progress in those areas.
#5
Quote by slap-a-bass
whatever you play, play to a click track. Set yourself deadlines, record and re-listen to your rhythm, and clearness of tone, time and touch (3 T's). Personally, i could never get myself to do this, so now im in school where i have actual deadlines for lets say an improv class or performance class and am making progress in those areas.


Other then a metronome how to do play to click tracks?

Also what is the easiest, cheapest way to record and mix into backing tracks? I have been out of this game for a while, so have no idea what is out there.
#6
If you only have an hour a day you should be realistic about your goals and set priorities.

With that little time, I would definitely focus on repertoire. Do a 15 minute warm up and use your hour on songs most days. Use it on technique and other skills a couple days a week. The focus should be on what enables you to play the most music competently.

Technique is important, but it takes a lot of consistent, time-consuming effort to build. To be perfectly blunt, playing awesome solos is probably not something you're going to achieve in an hour a day. Even if you doubled that, you'd be working on technique at the expense of other skills. You can spend a lot of time on technique that you'd realistically use for maybe 10 minutes out of a 3 hour gig.

That said, you can get the basic technique you need to play competently and learn a whole lot of music. Learning your chords up and down the fretboard will get you much further with the guitar than being able to play solos. It's good to have the scales under your fingers when you do take leads, but it's important to play within your competency.
#7
Quote by cdgraves
If you only have an hour a day you should be realistic about your goals and set priorities.

With that little time, I would definitely focus on repertoire. Do a 15 minute warm up and use your hour on songs most days. Use it on technique and other skills a couple days a week. The focus should be on what enables you to play the most music competently.

Technique is important, but it takes a lot of consistent, time-consuming effort to build. To be perfectly blunt, playing awesome solos is probably not something you're going to achieve in an hour a day. Even if you doubled that, you'd be working on technique at the expense of other skills. You can spend a lot of time on technique that you'd realistically use for maybe 10 minutes out of a 3 hour gig.

That said, you can get the basic technique you need to play competently and learn a whole lot of music. Learning your chords up and down the fretboard will get you much further with the guitar than being able to play solos. It's good to have the scales under your fingers when you do take leads, but it's important to play within your competency.


Firstly thank you everyone. I said an hour as that is the minimum I can commit to with kids and all. My weekends do allow for more time. I played probably 5 hours this weekend. Enough that my fingertips are sore anyway. I am realistic about my goals, but mostly my finger speed and picking is maybe better than I indicated. My real weakness is knowing where to go on the fret board. I took the suggestion and played to some backing tracks today by looking at scale and mode charts and was pleased. My best ally is the fact that I believe I can get there if I do my part.
#8
You gotta make that time count, keep focused and keep the practice routine high quality to make up for low quantity. An hour or two of high quality practice will definitely get you better. It probably won't make you Steve Vai, but I'm not Steve Vai either and I used to practice 12+ hours a day.