#1
Would it be wise to scallop all the frets on a Jackson Dinky-style neck EXCEPT for the first three frets? And what are the downsides to a scallop job like this? The frets won't be scalloped that deep, just enough for the benefits to shine through.
Last edited by ItsPoshJosh at Feb 14, 2016,
#2
Whether or not it's wise is entirely up to you.

I personally don't see a whole lot of point in scalloping a guitar that already has big frets to begin with. You aren't really touching the fretboard with really big frets and scalloping a fretboard serves exactly the same purpose.

And scalloping a fretboard isn't necessarily beneficial either. It might so happen that you don't like how it feels, but now you're stuck with it.

And why only scallop everything but the first 3 frets? Seems pretty arbitrary.
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#3
So when I play standard chords, it won't go out of tune due to pressing too hard on the strings. Thanks for the reply.
#4
I'd honestly do the whole thing for the looks and consistency when you play, the only guys who have had trouble playing my guitars that are scalloped are guys who grew up playing acoustics as their first guitars with 12-52s , those guys the notes go sharp/flat.

It's possible to play chords on scalloped necks without going sharp/flat too. If you don't fret down super hard you'll have no issues. I've even used capos to do stuff on severely scalloped fretboards and had no issues.

But if the guitar has jumbo frets and compound radius you'll still see some benefits. Jackson guitars can bend further and so forth already instead of a dull 9-ish radius fretboard with the narrowest frets ever. Honestly I started 12-24 like this or that player and liked it so much I did the rest of the fretboard. Maple fretboards I'd never do again but ebony or rosewood absolutely. Maple I didn't care for, for how dirty it got so quickly because of course we'd be stripping all the lacquer off.

I like how you wanted to go as light as possible too. As long as your fingers aren't touching the fretboard you did it right as excessive wood removal isn't needed. But yeah good luck, 10-46 strings maximum if you're an aggressive string bender, you could use 14-74s for all we care if your guitar could handle it but if you want to shred on the guitar since you can push the notes further stick to 9s or 10s because your knuckles will flare up. I've heard there are exercises or stretches to do but once i went down from 12s or to 9s or 10s i had no issues.

but i'd say and the only down side if you don't fret hard is sliding notes at first but you'd be surprised how "mind over matter" it is because it drove me nuts seeing the countless forum posts on various forums saying scalloped fretboards are "hard". I actually really wanted to test this theory out without the power of suggestion so whenever guys come over for pickup swaps or whatever they look at my bc riches I have out of cases on a rack and grab it and start bending notes while i do the quicker repairs to wiring and so forth not knowing they are scalloped, after 20-30 minutes I tell them. Put it this way I've done 10 guitars, if i won the lottery or saw a production model I wanted I'd do another 10.
Last edited by Tallwood13 at Feb 14, 2016,
#5
Quote by ItsPoshJosh
So when I play standard chords, it won't go out of tune due to pressing too hard on the strings. Thanks for the reply.

In that case, the solution isn't scalloping the fretboard, but rather to improve your technique.

You shouldn't be pressing so hard that it makes the guitar go out of tune. You should only fret the guitar as hard as you need to for the string to establish a solid contact with the frets. That's something which comes with experience.

Scalloping the fretboard will only make the technique problem you're having worse on the frets you've scalloped. If you're fretting too hard on open chords, you're probably going to be fretting too hard everywhere else on the fretboard too.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Feb 14, 2016,
#6
Do you touch the fretboard with Jumbo or XJ frets now?

I'd work on your technique and lighten your touch.

If you want to give it a try start with 12-24 and don't take much out. You can always go deeper but you can't put it back.
Guitars:
Ibanez RG1570 Prestige
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#7
Quote by metalmingee
Do you touch the fretboard with Jumbo or XJ frets now?

I'd work on your technique and lighten your touch.

If you want to give it a try start with 12-24 and don't take much out. You can always go deeper but you can't put it back.


My current guitar has jumbo frets, I like them a lot better than smaller-sized frets.
#8
Quote by Tallwood13
I'd honestly do the whole thing for the looks and consistency when you play, the only guys who have had trouble playing my guitars that are scalloped are guys who grew up playing acoustics as their first guitars with 12-52s , those guys the notes go sharp/flat.

It's possible to play chords on scalloped necks without going sharp/flat too. If you don't fret down super hard you'll have no issues. I've even used capos to do stuff on severely scalloped fretboards and had no issues.

But if the guitar has jumbo frets and compound radius you'll still see some benefits. Jackson guitars can bend further and so forth already instead of a dull 9-ish radius fretboard with the narrowest frets ever. Honestly I started 12-24 like this or that player and liked it so much I did the rest of the fretboard. Maple fretboards I'd never do again but ebony or rosewood absolutely. Maple I didn't care for, for how dirty it got so quickly because of course we'd be stripping all the lacquer off.

I like how you wanted to go as light as possible too. As long as your fingers aren't touching the fretboard you did it right as excessive wood removal isn't needed. But yeah good luck, 10-46 strings maximum if you're an aggressive string bender, you could use 14-74s for all we care if your guitar could handle it but if you want to shred on the guitar since you can push the notes further stick to 9s or 10s because your knuckles will flare up. I've heard there are exercises or stretches to do but once i went down from 12s or to 9s or 10s i had no issues.

but i'd say and the only down side if you don't fret hard is sliding notes at first but you'd be surprised how "mind over matter" it is because it drove me nuts seeing the countless forum posts on various forums saying scalloped fretboards are "hard". I actually really wanted to test this theory out without the power of suggestion so whenever guys come over for pickup swaps or whatever they look at my bc riches I have out of cases on a rack and grab it and start bending notes while i do the quicker repairs to wiring and so forth not knowing they are scalloped, after 20-30 minutes I tell them. Put it this way I've done 10 guitars, if i won the lottery or saw a production model I wanted I'd do another 10.


Thanks for going into detail, I'll probably start the scallop on frets 12-24 and if I like it I'll scallop the other frets.
#9
I'm okay with scalloped fretboards, but I haven't bothered to buy (or build) one for myself. With jumbo (or XJ) frets, there's little need for it (IMHO). Scalloped fretboards mostly happened because most guitars at the time had low or medium frets. If I were going to scallop a fretboard, it would be one that started with a 25.5" scale, and nothing shorter scale than that, and I wouldn't bother if a) I didn't play with a light touch and b) there were already tall frets on the guitar.

The near-perfect tool for this is the Dremel Contour Sander 6000 (currently out of production, I think, but available used everywhere). This is not a rotary tool, but has a set of accessories that are just what you need for getting progressively narrower areas between the frets done just right.




One comment: inlays are an issue, depending on how thick they are and how deep you go. You'll also want to be careful about the depth when it comes to the fretboard itself; you're going to pretty much eliminate any possibility that you'll be able to do repairs that will involve lifting and replacing the fretboard (such as truss rod replacement).
Last edited by dspellman at Feb 15, 2016,
#10
Quote by dspellman
I'm okay with scalloped fretboards, but I haven't bothered to buy (or build) one for myself. With jumbo (or XJ) frets, there's little need for it (IMHO). Scalloped fretboards mostly happened because most guitars at the time had low or medium frets. If I were going to scallop a fretboard, it would be one that started with a 25.5" scale, and nothing shorter scale than that, and I wouldn't bother if a) I didn't play with a light touch and b) there were already tall frets on the guitar.

The near-perfect tool for this is the Dremel Contour Sander 6000 (currently out of production, I think, but available used everywhere). This is not a rotary tool, but has a set of accessories that are just what you need for getting progressively narrower areas between the frets done just right.




One comment: inlays are an issue, depending on how thick they are and how deep you go. You'll also want to be careful about the depth when it comes to the fretboard itself; you're going to pretty much eliminate any possibility that you'll be able to do repairs that will involve lifting and replacing the fretboard (such as truss rod replacement).


shit I need one of those....I do all my scalloping by hand, this would help with my sanity