#1
Hi everyone,

Today, I feel so down that I can't do anything so I just pick up my electric and go to youtube and search for some blue backing track.

Let say the track is in A scale and I know A scale but is there a technique to make it sound really good?

Blue is all about beding and sliding. I know some lick that I stole from BB King, Eric & Slash, but what are some basic lick to play when you run out of the cool part?

Are there any technique or those proffesional guitar just spam the the fretboard with luck to produce a good feeling sound?
#2
You don't want to play scales. That's the thing. Play melodies. Treat scales as a way of finding the notes you are looking for. They shouldn't 100% dictate what you play. They should be used as a tool to find the notes you are looking for.

It's of course easier said than done. But usually the best melodies are in your head.

Two words - ear training. Do it. Learn songs by ear. If you want to learn to play solos, learn to play other people's solos by ear. That way you'll learn some licks and phrases. You'll learn the "language" of soloing. You can't just randomly noodle around with a scale and expect good melodies to come out of your fingers. That's just not how it works.


The best improvisers know the sound they are after. They can hear it in their head.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWjGhZt4Dsk

Look at Chick Corea's mouth at around 20 seconds. He basically sings every note he plays. He's aware of the notes he wants to play. It's not like his fingers are just randomly going up and down on the keyboard.

At around 1:30 his solo starts and you can notice the same thing - he clearly knows what he is doing.


Music is all about sound so you want to think in sound. It's actually kind of obvious when you start thinking about it. How else can you play good sounding music other than by knowing the sound?

Of course for many people it is the combination of muscle memory and ear. Many people have hundreds of phrases and licks under their fingers. They aren't creating new melodies all the time. Some people rely more on just muscle memory.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LVO1pv5Vf5w

This is good stuff about playing by ear. Paul Gilbert talks about how he used to just play with his fingers (I mean, licks that he had memorized - that sounded technical and impressive in that sense but it lacked some musicality) but now has started focusing a lot more on playing by ear and that made his playing a lot more melodic.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Feb 15, 2016,
#3
I also have melody running in my head but I don't know how to play it on guitar.
That's why sometimes I plug mic into my amp and doing some vocal melody.

I usually record the best melody I just come up with. I record it to my smart phone, sometime thru guitar rig, but I still having a hard time translate those thing into a guitar sound.

I could say this, ta ra ra ta ra ra ta ra ra ravv, tuk tak tak ruaaaaa ram ram.... but when I try to translate this think into guitar, I forget all the melody.
#4
How's your work with modes? My concept for translating ideas to music was absolute shit before my teacher forced me to go back and learn them.
#5
Nononononono do not go into modes.

OP, you have a vocal melody. Sing each note until you find the same one on your guitar. See the relationship between the notes.

One note at a time.
Glad to cross paths with you on this adventure called life
Quote by Jet Penguin
lots of flirting with the other key without confirming. JUST LIKE THEIR LOVE IN THE MOVIE OH DAMN.
Quote by Hail
you're acting like you have perfect pitch or something
#6
If you simply just play a scale it will not sound very good (in general). Sometimes you get by with noodling in a scale but it depends on the progression. What you would be aware of is the chord changes and play the changes. Particularly Blues. If you're just playing the Blues scale without being aware of the changes, it'll tend to sound sloppy. Try to think of the arpeggios of each chord, superimposed on the Blues Scale. Hit the changes and it will sound like you know what you're doing.

That being said, it's not set in concrete. Sometimes you want to play right through the changes. In this case, running a scale might be ok as long as you resolve it.
#7
Quote by sosxradar
I also have melody running in my head but I don't know how to play it on guitar.
That's why sometimes I plug mic into my amp and doing some vocal melody.

I usually record the best melody I just come up with. I record it to my smart phone, sometime thru guitar rig, but I still having a hard time translate those thing into a guitar sound.

I could say this, ta ra ra ta ra ra ta ra ra ravv, tuk tak tak ruaaaaa ram ram.... but when I try to translate this think into guitar, I forget all the melody.
Like Neo says, one note at a time.
Do that when composing the melody to begin with. Sing a note, find it on the guitar. Or vice versa, play a note (any note) and sing it. Then sing another and find that one. Etc.

Otherwise you need to load your recorded vocal into a slowdowner and learn it note by note that way.
#9
Of course scales work. But scales on their own don't result in good solos. Scales are just a way of finding the notes you are looking for. Playing minor pentatonic over the whole blues progression can sound great. But you need to know what you are doing, not just play the scale up and down or randomly play the notes in that scale.


You don't want to "play scales" over a backing track. Use the scales as a way of finding the notes you are looking for.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Feb 15, 2016,
#10
Quote by MaggaraMarine
..Playing minor pentatonic over the whole blues progression can sound great. ...


I'd beg to defer a bit:

I'll use your Blues example. Over the I chord, if you're playing the minor pent and happen to hit the b3 of the minor, unless you resolve it pretty quickly, it will tend to sound bad. On the other hand over the IV or V you can sit on it all day.

That's why a strictly scalar approach to solo'ing doesn't work well without understanding (or at least having a feel for) the underlying progression.
#11
^ it's "beg to differ" btw

MM said that [it] can sound great - not that it will sound great no matter what, so you may both be right in your own way

but taste is really subjective, I think the 7#9 sound works deftly sometimes.
Attachments:
quick blues shuffle.gp5
Glad to cross paths with you on this adventure called life
Quote by Jet Penguin
lots of flirting with the other key without confirming. JUST LIKE THEIR LOVE IN THE MOVIE OH DAMN.
Quote by Hail
you're acting like you have perfect pitch or something
#12
Quote by NeoMvsEu
^ it's "beg to differ" btw


lol. Of course. If I don't pay attention, my spelling corrector can sometimes do strange things. This time at least it was homologous....

EDIT: "but taste is really subjective, I think the 7#9 sound works deftly sometimes." Yes, but there you go. You know it's working like a #9 in this instance (over the I). But, if you're blindly plodding through a pentatonic scale it doesn't work too well unless you understand the relation to the chord. Music is so nuanced its hard at times to say one thing is right and another thing is wrong. I'm not saying scales aren't important.

Personally, I used to have a hard time with using scales when someone says "play this scale over this song". I imagine others do too. The key to unlock this is to think more in relation to what's happening with the chords. For example, for practicing purposes, it might be better to try noodling around with the arpeggios and then think of the scale as additional structure on top of that.
Last edited by edg at Feb 15, 2016,
#13
The b3 is used all the time in vocal melodies over the I major chord. Listen to Led Zeppelin's "Rock and Roll" for example. The melody starts with b3 over the I chord. Same with "Hound Dog". Many AC/DC songs also use the b3 in a major key.

I don't know why it wouldn't work in solos.

Many melodies are based on the minor pentatonic scale, even if it's a major song.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#14
Quote by sosxradar
Hi everyone,

Today, I feel so down that I can't do anything so I just pick up my electric and go to youtube and search for some blue backing track.

Let say the track is in A scale and I know A scale but is there a technique to make it sound really good?

Blue is all about beding and sliding. I know some lick that I stole from BB King, Eric & Slash, but what are some basic lick to play when you run out of the cool part?

Are there any technique or those proffesional guitar just spam the the fretboard with luck to produce a good feeling sound?


You ask good questions. What is your lead playing experience?

What to you define as "good"? Good is one of those words that can mean something different depending on the ears that is listening. That's why some people like a certain pop star, and I might not.

I don't know the extent of your experience or what youve been exposed to playing wise.

Best,

Sean
#15
sox ... do you understand about chord tones?

Simple experiment: get someone to play an A7, and now listen to the effect of each note (A, A#, B, C, C#, D, D#, E, F, F#, G, G#) in isolation against that chord. Hold the note for awhile. Chances are you won't be too happy with the sound of A#, D, F or G#. Try it. That's because those particular notes are a semitone higher than the chord tones (A, C#, E, G). So this is hinting that chord tones impose themselves and need treating with respect. These "clashy" notes can be used, but not emphasised to keep the clashung effect down.

The A minor pentatonic (A, C, D, E, G) doesn't have this problem. Each note coincides with A7, apart from the C ... a semitone LOWER than the chord tone. This gives a bluesy efffect.

So, soloing over the A7 should use a chord tone as a landing point.

Also, two semitones ABOVE a chord tone typically works ok. That adds B, D#, F#.

These guys can be used for more colour, often as passing tones on the way to or from one chord tone to another.

Go through the exact same process, with D7, and then see how A minor pentatonic works against it. (notice where (if) you get any notes a semitone higher than the chord tones in D7 in particular.

WIth the above in mind, think of a melody, and try just placing one chord tone per bar initially. Then try adding some of the other notes (so shortening the original chord tone choice. Think about the phrasing used, and try to maintain a similar repeated phrasing over a few bars.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Feb 16, 2016,
#16
That why people always face the other direction when they see people talking about music theory :/

You can look at BB king. He's playing from his hearth. He know little about music theory. I just want to have a great feeling like him.
#17
Not sure what some people in this thread are talking about. Playing a single scale works over a backing track as long as it's in the correct key
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g5n5X6bXhTc


Another important part of soloing is keeping the rhythm tight. I would advise trying to align your playing with another instrument like the snare drum. You can be playing the right scale with bad timing and it can sound off.
Last edited by J23L at Feb 16, 2016,
#18
Quote by sosxradar
That why people always face the other direction when they see people talking about music theory :/

You can look at BB king. He's playing from his hearth. He know little about music theory. I just want to have a great feeling like him.


No sosxradar,

That's why people like you are coming up short when it comes to playing. You asked a question, but you didn't understand and follow the answer. If not knowing theory was enough, then you wouldn't be asking, how to make a solo sound good when you play it.

Let's make it clear what you want:

You want the results of someone that's put in the hours and time and personal investment into their playing and understanding....

Without having to put in that same level of commitment and personal investment.

If that were not the case, you would be just fine with running a scale over a key. But clearly that's not doing it for you. No, you want to sound "different". So tell me, how are you going to do that, if you can't even understand Jerry's answer?

How are you going to understand Jerry's answer unless you put in the commitment and investment into yourself. You said before, you can't take lessons, and putting money into this, isn't an option.

It seems to me, that you believe there's an answer out there that you want to hear that will give you these magic abilities and knowledge without personal investment. Maybe there is, but if so, I don't know what that is.

Let's take a different topic - art, or painting. Sure there are people out there, that have never gone to art school and never taken a class, that have paintings in museums, and their works have sold for 10's of thousands of dollars. Of course.

But I'm not that artist. Are you? Some people can do it but I cant look at their art, and justify why I shouldn't go take an art or painting class, and YET expect the same results. Can you? Can you point at someone's painting out there and say "I can do it too?" Cause I sure can't. That would be pretty arrogant of me, unless I showed a natural affinity for art...some have it, I do not.

Same with music; some have it... I do not. I had to work at it, and invest in myself to know what I know and understand what I understand, and teach what I teach.

Do you "have it"? Are you a natural?

So if I start posting, "how do you make shadows, how do you make this life like, how do I make this painting that's awesome when I flail my brush around a canvas, should I throw down my paint brush? I wanna be like Jackson Pollack, how can I paint and come up with grand ideas like Banksy without working at it"

Sounds a little ridiculous now, doesn't it?

By the way BB King did know theory - he learned it from his own band between towns when they'd tour together. His backing band members did know theory. He even credited this knowledge as having improved his own music.

So now what are you going to do, soxradar?

Best,

Sean