#3
Looks like a I IV V in G. G major or G major pentatonic.

Which chord sounds like the tonic? Like it's stable, at rest, like you could play that chord last and it would sound resolved, like home. That's your key. If it's a major chord then it's probably a major key, if it's a minor chord it's probably a minor key. That's the most basic approach. Also check if the other chords fit into the key signature.

G = G B D
C = C E G
D = D F# A

put them in order and see what scale you get
G A B C D E F#

That could be the G major scale or, if you moved them around, E minor. Since G is the key note there you go.

If you end up with extra doubled up notes (like B and Bb so you have 8 notes total) or it sounds like it should be in a certain key but there are some notes that don't fit the scale that's fine. It just means that on whatever chord with the out of key notes it might be a good idea to pay attention to those notes and stray away from the diatonic scale a little bit.

With blues it's very common to mix major and minor together, like you might have a G major chord progression and play G minor licks over it.
Last edited by The4thHorsemen at Feb 17, 2016,
#4
Quote by swapnildevre
Guys which scale should i use for this chord progression G C D..?
Short answer is G major. (Oh yeah 20tigers already said that )

Why? Because those are the notes the chords are made up from. (See The4thHorsemen's reply )

In fact, you don't even need to know the note names, or identify the name of the scale. Just look at your chord shapes:
G = 3-2-0-0-0-3
C = x-3-2-0-1-0
D = x-0-0-2-3-2

Add them all up and what do you get?
-----------------------------0-2-3---------------
---------------------0-1-3-----------------------
----------------0-2-----------------------------
-----------0-2----------------------------------
---0-2-3-----------------------------------------
-3---------------------------------------------
There's your scale.

OK, there happens to be one note missing in the middle (fret 4 4th string) - and a couple below the G on 6th string - but there's plenty there to improvise with: two whole octaves of notes. 2/3 of the entire range of the guitar, pretty much.

You want to go higher on the neck? Then my suggestion is - learn chord shapes higher on the neck and go from there. You're going to have to learn the chord-scale connections sooner or later anyway, and better to learn chord shapes before scale patterns - because if you learn chord shapes, the scale patterns become irrelevant. Whereas chords never become irrelevant.

HOWEVER...

The one catch here is if this is a BLUES - or if you want it to sound bluesy. In that case, you use G minor pentatonic or G blues scale, which doesn't exactly fit the chords. It's not supposed to. (You can bend it into the chord tones if you want - if you know where your chord tones are of course.... see above.)
Last edited by jongtr at Feb 17, 2016,
#5
G-C-D is your basic I-IV-V Blues progression.

So G Major, G Minor Pent, G Mixolydian, G Blues Scale will work pretty well.

remember to work on the changes and not just use the scale without thinking. If it helps, try arppegiatting along with the changes and then work in some scale ideas on top.
#6
Quote by edg
G-C-D is your basic I-IV-V Blues progression.
Not only blues, of course . Your basic I-IV-IV in any style of music employing the western (European) key system.
(Blues is actually somewhat "foreign" to that, hence the tension between blues scale and a major I-IV-V.)
#7
Quote by edg
G-C-D is your basic I-IV-V Blues progression.

So G Major, G Minor Pent, G Mixolydian, G Blues Scale will work pretty well.

remember to work on the changes and not just use the scale without thinking. If it helps, try arppegiatting along with the changes and then work in some scale ideas on top.

I disagree with the blues part. Yes, blues uses I, IV and V chords. But they are usually all dominant 7th chords which gives it that "bluesy" sound. If you just play a straight major I-IV-V progression, we are most likely not talking about blues, especially if it doesn't follow the 12 bar blues progression.


I-IV-V does definitely not originate from blues.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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