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#1
Hey guys, this is a bit of a weird question but here it goes, can someone tell me some newer more forward thinking guitar companies out there? I've only ever owned "classic" guitars (les pauls, strats, ect...) and Im looking for something more practical and forward thinking, I know of strandberg but I can really think of anyone else doing anything similar. Thanks!
#2
Well..."forward thinking" is kind of vague...

In no particular order, and for a variety of reasons, I'll post:

Parker
Flaxwood
Codella
Moog
Vigier
Rainsong
RKS
Teuffel
Crimson
Fernandes
Bell
R. Backlund
Veilette
Godin
Line 6
Obstructures
Rick Toone
John Kammerer
Grath
Steinberger
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#3
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Well..."forward thinking" is kind of vague...

In no particular order, and for a variety of reasons, I'll post:

Parker
Flaxwood
Codella
Moog
Vigier
Rainsong
RKS
Teuffel
Crimson
Fernandes
Bell
R. Backlund
Veilette
Godin
Line 6
Obstructures
Rick Toone
John Kammerer
Grath
Steinberger

I meant it to be kinda vague, Im just looking for a company that does something different than most. Thanks for the list man I'll check them out
#4
Quote by PancakesGO!!!!
I meant it to be kinda vague, Im just looking for a company that does something different than most. Thanks for the list man I'll check them out


Just look at Gibsons 2015 line of 'true innovations'

#5
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#6
Quote by paruwi
Just look at Gibsons 2015 line of 'true innovations'


That actually made me laugh
#7
Some more:

Chrysalis/Ridgewing
ODD Guitars
Licea
Nicole
Normandy
Metalcarver
Trussart
Alumisonic
Bergeron
Bulletproof
GlenAlum
Liquid Metal
Myka
Thunder Eagle
Tolgahan Cogulu
Visionary Instruments
Novak
Wes Lambe
Auerswald
Branch
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Feb 17, 2016,
#8
Quote by dannyalcatraz
Some more:

Chrysalis/Ridgewing
ODD Guitars
Licea
Nicole
Normandy
Metalcarver
Trussart
Alumisonic
Bergeron
Bulletproof
GlenAlum
Liquid Metal
Myka
Thunder Eagle
Tolgahan Cogulu
Visionary Instruments
Novak
Wes Lambe
Auerswald
Branch

Woah man, you're awesome
#10
Dont think anyones thrown these in
Ormsby
Skervesen
Halo
Carillion
Kiesel
aristides
Just those off the top of meh head

woops i forgot Chapman. how could i do that?
Last edited by mpotato at Feb 17, 2016,
#11
Don't forget PRS, they pretty much lit the fire for innovation when they went public in the mid 80's.

But there are lots and lots
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#12
I'd consider Music Man as modern and forward thinking as well. And there's Tao guitars as well. Small company from Belgium, but they make some stellar looking stuff.
#13
Blakhart
Suhr
Reverend
Washburn

So what genre are you looking for?
Guitars:
Ibanez RG1570 Prestige
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#15
I don't know about anybody doing anything that is completely new or original. Often something being marketed as "new" is an old idea that just didn't catch on when it was first introduced (E-bow, zero fret) or it's something no one was asking for (Gibson Mini-tune).
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#16
Quote by PancakesGO!!!!
Hey guys, this is a bit of a weird question but here it goes, can someone tell me some newer more forward thinking guitar companies out there? I've only ever owned "classic" guitars (les pauls, strats, ect...) and Im looking for something more practical and forward thinking,


There's no hint of what "forward thinking" might be in any of this. And most of the guitar companies mentioned haven't really done anything innovative.

I have to give props to Kurt Zentmaier of Rondo Music for both the marketing model and his "innovation."

He's directly importing guitars and selling them direct; no brick and mortar store involved, and that helps keep costs way down. The "standard" guitars he's been selling have been extremely high quality for the money spent, and the spec is outstanding. He offers a neck-through construction Les Paul style guitar with a solid maple cap that has a tummy cut and an Axcess-style neck heel for about $500. Gibson doesn't do that at any price.

He's been extremely open to new ideas, and he's been a pioneer in getting 7, 8, 9 and 10-string guitars in scales up to 30" out to folks at ordinary production guitar prices (these were previously high-end or even custom-shop only guitars from other builders), and he's really put multi-scale (fan-fret) guitars, previously available ONLY from custom builders) into the hands of budget-minded guitar players who might otherwise never have tried them. He offers one of the few fan-fret acoustic guitars I've ever seen. And he's offered a semi-custom shop for Korean-based guitars, so that people can access personalized (and sometimes seriously ugly) guitars at an extremely reasonable price.

I'd also have to give a shout out to Carvin, and especially Carvin's Jeff Kiesel, who's really revived the Carvin custom guitar side of things. Carvin is suddenly offering multi-string headless guitars, fan-fret headless guitars, even more exotic woods and finish choices than they'd previously been known for. New pickup choices, new guitar shapes, etc. Through all of this, Carvin has maintained a build quality that shames the big builders, and prices that make sense.
#17
Quote by Rickholly74
I don't know about anybody doing anything that is completely new or original. Often something being marketed as "new" is an old idea that just didn't catch on when it was first introduced (E-bow, zero fret) or it's something no one was asking for (Gibson Mini-tune).


There have been a few. Line 6 with its Variax modeling guitars aren't exactly new (what, 12 years now?), but no one else is offering the ability to change tunings all over the map, even with a guitar sporting a Floyd Rose.

There are combinations of ideas that are intriguing: the Trussart Steelphonic is a 25.5" scale bolt neck guitar with a single-cut shaped body. But the body is steel, the bridge is set on top of a "candy box" (like a resonator) that has a piezo transducer built into it that can be combined with a pair of humbuckers. Not your usual sounds. The finishes are etched/painted/plated and some are highly unusual.

Part of the reason we don't see a lot of innovation in guitars is that the guitar players themselves aren't innovators these days, but followers. And a manufacturer knows that all he has to do to sell guitars to newbs is hose down a superstrat with flat black paint. Why put out effort when they've got people willing to plunk down cash for "me too, me too!" guitars.
#18
Quote by metalmingee

Reverend



How did I not post that one?

Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#20
define "modern"and "newer". most of those companies and people posted have been around for 25+ years if not more.
#21
Even an old company can innovate.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#22
Quote by metalmingee
So what genre are you looking for?

Prog metal, and whatever the hell "djent" is
And to give an example of what a I mean by innovative, look at strandberg, thats what Im talking about, not Chapman or brands like that because they're still kinda sticking to the basics, Im looking for something that does something nobody else really does.
Last edited by PancakesGO!!!! at Feb 17, 2016,
#23
Quote by dspellman
There have been a few. Line 6 with its Variax modeling guitars aren't exactly new (what, 12 years now?), but no one else is offering the ability to change tunings all over the map, even with a guitar sporting a Floyd Rose.

There are combinations of ideas that are intriguing: the Trussart Steelphonic is a 25.5" scale bolt neck guitar with a single-cut shaped body. But the body is steel, the bridge is set on top of a "candy box" (like a resonator) that has a piezo transducer built into it that can be combined with a pair of humbuckers. Not your usual sounds. The finishes are etched/painted/plated and some are highly unusual.

Part of the reason we don't see a lot of innovation in guitars is that the guitar players themselves aren't innovators these days, but followers. And a manufacturer knows that all he has to do to sell guitars to newbs is hose down a superstrat with flat black paint. Why put out effort when they've got people willing to plunk down cash for "me too, me too!" guitars.


umm... didn't steinberger have the trans trem which did allow you to change tunings. also while technically "innovative" modelling in the variax allows you to sound like all those "old" guitars . not sure if that really fits the bill here or not.
#24
I was thinking variax too .... being able to tune up or down by switch would be pretty darn handy playing live ..... otherwise it's pretty easy to change body shapes , add belvell's , change dye colors , ect , not really anything cutting edge new
#25
As I understand, the TransTrem is just an integrated capo- which IS an innovation- whereas the Line 6 Variax can let you effectively change from E Standard to Open C. DADGAD, and other tunings depending on how you have it programmed.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Feb 17, 2016,
#26
Quote by dannyalcatraz
As I understand, the TransTrem is just an integrated capo- which IS an innovation- whereas the Line 6 Variax can let you effectively change from E Standard to Open C. DADGAD, and other tunings depending on how you have it programmed.


pretty sure it changed the tunings of the strings somehow. while not as versatile as the variax it still changed tunings . just ribbing dspellman
#27
I don't think so- I'm trying to buy one, so I have looked at them VERY closely. It's just a rolling capo.

...unless it now has one of those individual string capos now.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#28
Quote by dannyalcatraz
I don't think so- I'm trying to buy one, so I have looked at them VERY closely. It's just a rolling capo.

...unless it now has one of those individual string capos now.

according to the vid on the steinberger site it changes teh pitch of the strings and doesn't mention using a capo to do so. i may have misunderstood but i didn't get that vib from the vid. a capo wouldn't keep all the strings in tune wehn string bending either which the trans trem does.
#30
Quote by dannyalcatraz


How did I not post that one?


I was curious how YOU forgot that one!
Guitars:
Ibanez RG1570 Prestige
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#31
Quote by monwobobbo
umm... didn't steinberger have the trans trem which did allow you to change tunings. also while technically "innovative" modelling in the variax allows you to sound like all those "old" guitars . not sure if that really fits the bill here or not.


The Steinberger TransTrem was pretty innovative when developed in 1984. It's a very good mechanical system that allows you to select one of several optional tunings. However, like the TransPerformance bridge (like a MinETune but with the motors in the bridge) and the Robot tuners (the motors are in the tuners), it relies on changing string tension.

That does two things; it changes the playability of the instrument (some strings are too floppy, some can't be bent) and it's limited in scope. On the one end, the strings become too floppy to play and on the other, they simply break. Or the tuners do.

The Variax maintains string tension while allowing the electronic pitch replacement of individual strings as much as an octave in either direction. It's routine to switch to Baritone tuning or any of the drop tunings given the factory presets, but you can also instantly (as in the time it takes for a foot stomp) change to a DADGAD or a Blues G and back again. Moreover, you can set up custom tunings and save them as user presets.
#32
Quote by monwobobbo
also while technically "innovative" modelling in the variax allows you to sound like all those "old" guitars . not sure if that really fits the bill here or not.


The original guitars modeled by the Variax included LPs, teles, strats, etc., but also included acoustic guitars, sitar, 12-strings, etc.

But wait, there's more. Since single coil pickup guitars are modeled, there are no noise issues. If you play in a bar where RFI and EM interference from ice machine compressor motors and neon signs will make P90's go nuts, for example, none of that affects the modeled single coils on a Variax.

But wait, there's still more. Editing software allows you to change everything about the guitar modeled, from pickup placement to pickup types (and numbers) to output to body type, body shape, etc., and fretboard scale, even string gauge (I think). You can start with an "old" guitar or build something completely new.

We're not done yet! The acoustic models also allow you to use the "tone" knob to adjust the distance of the "microphone" from the guitar, thus changing the sound further.

Over the years, Variax has produced a number of different *kinds* of guitar, from the original electrics to an couple of different "acoustic" versions (I have an Acoustic 700 that's essentially a solid body mahogany guitar hidden under what looks like a small thin-body acoustic exterior). Edge of U2 has a pair of these that he uses on stage constantly. In the company of other acoustic guitars whose onboard electronic pickups are run to a mixer, the Acoustic 700 sounds like a large Gibson, a Martin, a Guild, a 12-string or (thanks to that alternate tuning capability) a bass. No, seriously.

Speaking of bass, there are two Variax basses out there (discontinued); the 4-string 700 and the 5-string 705. Both are much sought after. Both model a number of distinctive other basses, including Rics, P-bass, J-bass and many more.
#33
This thread got me thinking about how I view "modern" With regard to guitars:

Midi pickups.

Floating trems

Self-tuners

Metals and synthetics that make the guitar lighter, tonally different or more stable. All that wooden stuff that was listed is mostly cosmetic.

IMO, the last one is the present frontier. Any contenders?

We all tend to think about the guitar because it is the bit we hold, but the instrument is really the guitar and its amplification chain. The important changes over the past few years have been in the way the sound is processed and amplified, and to a much lesser extent how the sound is captured.
#34
Quote by dspellman
Edge of U2 has a pair of these that he uses on stage constantly.


You sounded convincing until that sentence
#35
Metals and synthetics that make the guitar lighter, tonally different or more stable. All that wooden stuff that was listed is mostly cosmetic.

IMO, the last one is the present frontier. Any contenders?


Several of the ones I mentioned are making guitars out of unusual materials:

Flaxwood: composite wood
Chrysalis: carbon fiber "inflatable" guitar
Parker, Rainsong, etc: all kinds of composites
Nicole: Corian
Bell: wood & acrylic
Vigier: delta metal fingerboards on fretless models
Licea: bamboo
Normandy, Grath, etc: aluminum
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#36
Thanks. The carbon fibre ones, Rainsong and the like, have the most appeal to me, but the 3D printers are doing some wild-looking stuff these days. I guess it is mostly cosmetic, but it is so different from wood that I would include it in my white list. Here's an example I found in a Google search:



I wonder how strong it is?
#37
Quote by Tony Done
I wonder how strong it is?

it has brass balls.

seriously, look, there's brass balls inside it.
#38
I think that's one of ODD Guitars's 3-D printed guitars.

Edit: yep- the ODD Atom.
http://www.odd.org.nz/atom.html
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Feb 18, 2016,
#39
This thread reminds me about how I should sell both my cars and get a Mayones Regius.
#40
Yes. You are wise beyond your years.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
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