#1
1: How high/low should my guitar be?
This tends to confuse me.

When playing the electric guitar standing up, how high/low should my guitar be?

On youtube, I see some guitarists/bassists in bands that have them really low (nearly touching the ground, okay that may be a bit of an exaggeration, but still really low)
And other bands' guitarists have their instruments somewhat high.

For me, I've tried having it high, but it feels kind of weird, especially since it sort of makes reaching the thicker strings and picking them quickly, kind of difficult. but picking the thinner strings is somewhat easier.
But when I try to lower my guitar, my left hand (the one pressing the frets) kind of hurts from having to bend my wrist a lot, especially at the higher frets


So ideally, how high or low should my guitar be?

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2. Is it possible to play 7String dropA songs on a 6String guitar?
Long story short, I listen to quite a number of bands that use 7String guitars, but I only have 6 string guitars.

Could I use a DAW to drop the tuning on my guitar? (My guitar is in CGCFAD)

--------------

Thanks
-Parac
#2
The first part is really a preference thing. The guitar is supposed to go where you play it the best, whatever height that may be
As for the second, I have no idea and I hope someone else can help you out!
#3
1) Have the guitar at the same height you would when sitting. Contrary to ignorant people thinking having the guitar low makes you "look cool", being able to play your instrument to the best of your abilities is even cooler.

2) Yes, you just have to tune your guitar lower. Chances are your current string gauge is too light for that tuning. You'll probably need thicker strings otherwise it will feel like you're playing spaghetti.
#4
Quote by vayne92
1) Have the guitar at the same height you would when sitting.

This is ideal for the majority of people. If your playing involves lots of vibrato/bending/muting that brings your thumb over the top of the fretboard most of the time, a lower position may well give you a better hand angle, but since you're looking at playing drop A tunes, "the higher the better" probably applies.
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#5
this is what Sharky told me about those vidyas -
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Just keep relaxed and try not to focus TOO much on those videos

-Sharky


Actually I did stop trying to emulate.
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#6
+1 Vayne92. It's tough to play decently when your guitar is down by your knees but most of the posers I see play like that in videos think it looks cool (it doesn't) and generally I find they don't play well to begin with.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#7
Quote by Parac
1: How high/low should my guitar be?
This tends to confuse me.

When playing the electric guitar standing up, how high/low should my guitar be?

On youtube, I see some guitarists/bassists in bands that have them really low (nearly touching the ground, okay that may be a bit of an exaggeration, but still really low)
And other bands' guitarists have their instruments somewhat high.

For me, I've tried having it high, but it feels kind of weird, especially since it sort of makes reaching the thicker strings and picking them quickly, kind of difficult. but picking the thinner strings is somewhat easier.
But when I try to lower my guitar, my left hand (the one pressing the frets) kind of hurts from having to bend my wrist a lot, especially at the higher frets


So ideally, how high or low should my guitar be?

--------------

2. Is it possible to play 7String dropA songs on a 6String guitar?
Long story short, I listen to quite a number of bands that use 7String guitars, but I only have 6 string guitars.

Could I use a DAW to drop the tuning on my guitar? (My guitar is in CGCFAD)

--------------

Thanks
-Parac


It's generally preferable to have the guitar up at about the same height as if you were sitting - look at the "classical position" for the ideal generic guitar height. That being said, some players, like Slash, play very well with their guitar quite low.

I would say, generally speaking, that it's a bad approach if you plan on playing technically difficult material because you waste more energy and effort trying to balance the guitar. John Pettrucci, for example, even puts his leg up on a monitor to get his guitar at classical height whenever he needs to rip the more difficult passages in his set - he does this on purpose so that he can pull them off with less effort and hassle.

It really depends on the style of music you play as well. I'd say for basic classic rock going all the way up to Slash's level of difficulty, you can get away with a low strap - but for more advanced styles it becomes a problem.
#8
Playing with a severely bent wrist on your fretting hand, for a long time, is bad (can cause physical problems) and also puts more tension into the hand compared to when the wrist is flat.

So, with the guitar dropped beyond your nether regions, you're going to have the above problem, and some say this can make your playing sound like a load of bollocks.
#9
You can totally drop the tuning further than your guitar is comfortable with using the DAW. Here's a track I did a few months ago to test this out, actually!
https://soundcloud.com/deandimarzo/drop-f-tests

That's a 6-string Fender American Deluxe Telecaster in Standard tuning, dropped down 10 half-steps to F# Standard. Came out pretty beefy!
#10
Generally the best way to go is forget about what someone thinks about looking cool and set the guitar so it drops no more than an inch or two when you stand up. I usually set mine that way, and one of my guitars, the Peavey Patriot, seems to be more comfortable an inch or two lower than usual so I go with it.

I tried the Jimmy Page low guitar routine years ago, it was OK but once I started to play a lot onstage I found it made my left wrist sore before long so I started shortening my guitar straps.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#11
Whatever heights feels most comfortable is probably the best. If you find a certain height that you feel has the right aesthetic, but it is slightly uncomfortable to play, you can always focus on always practicing in that position. It's really your choice; find the balance and go with what makes sense to you!
#12
1. Is strictly preference, as what every has said.

2. I had a guitar I used strictly for c standard and lower, and I used dean markley mediums. Seemed to work fine.
#13
Is the classical way of holding the guitar helps prevent wrist injury ? My left hand wrist tend to get painful at the joint when I practise the guitar. Is this something to be addressed to seriously ?
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#14
Quote by Stuck_nomore
Is the classical way of holding the guitar helps prevent wrist injury ? My left hand wrist tend to get painful at the joint when I practise the guitar. Is this something to be addressed to seriously ?


Classical position can help a bit with that yes... but at the end of the day, it's your technique that probably needs fixing.

If something is hurting, then you're doing something wrong.
#15
Whatever you feel comfortable and helps you play better. For what I do I prefer the classical position of the guitar neck almost upright.
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#16
It's a preference thing, but generally, the lower it is, the more there is a trade off for looking cool, over being able to play difficult things.

So, low slung guitarists tend to play more technically basic sort of stuff, which works well for sort of power chord distortion strums. Whereas more intricate sort of players would prefer a position that frees them up the most.

Pulling the neck up also gives good access, so a guitarist might have the guitar low for the rhythm parts, and the pull it up a bit for solos and more intricate things.

I like barre chords a lot, so there's no way I would ever have a low slung guitar, because that would destroy my hands/wrists, very quickly. You really want sort of a straight wrist, which you can get from lifting the neck, or a higher slung guitar. The thumb wrap would be alright though for a low strung setup.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Feb 24, 2016,
#17
Quote by DanyFS
Classical position can help a bit with that yes... but at the end of the day, it's your technique that probably needs fixing.

If something is hurting, then you're doing something wrong.


This is how I hold my guitar. Notice the left wrist is bending like some almost 90 degree.

Is this way of holding wrong ?


Amateur guitarist straight from the oven !




#18
Quote by Stuck_nomore
This is how I hold my guitar. Notice the left wrist is bending like some almost 90 degree.

Is this way of holding wrong ?


The guitar isn't being held wrong.

For me it feels wrong, because I really prefer the classical position. I used to hold my guitars like that, but after buying a V, I noticed that I could play better and feel more comfortable in classical position.

Experiment, and see what works best for you.
#19
Quote by Stuck_nomore
This is how I hold my guitar. Notice the left wrist is bending like some almost 90 degree.

Is this way of holding wrong ?



It's not necessarily wrong, but the general consensus is that classical position is better. Not only for comfort, but playing ability as well.

Now, in response to TS;

1. How high should you have your guitar? The simplest answer is wherever it's comfortable to play. All the style in the world doesn't matter if you can't actually play.

2. Can you play 7-string songs on a 6-string? It depends on the song. If you get a baritone guitar or just tune down a regular 6 string, then yeah, you'll be able to hit the lower notes. But if you ever have to hit a high E at the 24th fret of the first string, you're going to have to get a little creative. Maybe use some harmonics, although it still won't sound quite right. In the long run, you're much better off just saving up some cash and buying a 7-string.
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#20
Wear it low. Not too low but lets face it when its right up high it just doesn't look Rock n Roll!
#21
Regarding the drop-A question, it'll probably work, but it really depends on the song. The first thing you need to do is listen to the song you want to learn all the way through and identify the highest and lowest notes. Can you fit all those notes on a six string guitar If so, proceed.
The other problem you might encounter is chord voicings that just don't work unless you have all 7 strings. Do the bands you listen to use thick jazzy chord voicings?
#22
My advice is to have it relatively high, not least for the health of your fretting arm. I wrote a short article on some of this here: http://www.stuartbahn.com/i-cant-play-guitar-standing-up/