#1
Hey everyone Im trying to figure out how to transpose tabs I sorta of get how people do it with the basic chords. But when I'm playing songs with more complicated riffs or solos I have no idea. Some people tell me to just tune down but there's some songs that I can't tune down farther because I'm already in drop B or Bb. If any one can help out that would be great one song I'm trying to work on is leave it alone by Tremonti tabs: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/tab/43747561
If you could maybe transpose a peice and explain what you did so I can start learning how to do this that would be great thanks a lot in advance!
#2
Basically, just subtract or add the same number to every single tabbed note. To drop by 3 semitones, subtract 3. (So a note at fret 10 would move to fret 7).

The issue you then face is what happens if this makes notes "drop off" the guitar. E.g fret 3 and above are fine for the above example, but frets 2,1 and 0 (the open string) have nowhere to go, without then relocating them on the next lower string.

E.g. fret 2 would need to go to fret 2 - 3 = fret "-1". It's fallen off!

Assuming you're in standard relative tuning:

If this falling off occurs on the 1st, 3rd, 4th or 5th string, then you'd move to the adjacent lower string (2nd, 4th, 5th or 6th string) and add 5 (semitones), so that would end up at fret -1 + 5 = 4th fret.

If the note falls off the 2nd string, you can find it on the 3rd string at fret -1 + 4 = 3rd fret.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Feb 18, 2016,
#3
Ok I'm able to get it for the single notes but I'm still a little confused doing it with the bar chords could you give me an example with that. Sorry for being such a pain lol
#4
Quote by EthanMiles
Ok I'm able to get it for the single notes but I'm still a little confused doing it with the bar chords could you give me an example with that. Sorry for being such a pain lol



You would do the same thing for the chords. move them down the same number of frets as the other notes. if you "fall off" on the E as the other poster put it, you will need to play the chord up an octave.
#5
Quote by EthanMiles
Ok I'm able to get it for the single notes but I'm still a little confused doing it with the bar chords could you give me an example with that. Sorry for being such a pain lol


Same approach ... if there is room, the whole shape just moves down (e.g. by 3 frets, keeping with above example). But, if you run out of room, you can do as Adam suggests (which will make quite a change to the sound of the progression), or you can try and relocate the chord. This is feasible if the chord was originally rooted on any string other than the 6th string ... as you can relocate that shape to the nearest lower string. If the chord root is on the 6th, and you run out room, then you can do the octave shift, or you can use a chord inversion (typically).

I could show you this in literally a couple of minutes, but it'll take a load of typing. What you need to understand is how the string tuning impacts every single shape made on the guitar. If you get this, you'll understand how to move shapes vertically (across the strings) ... horizontal moves (along the strings) are trivial ... keep the hand pattern identical, and all the relationships in that original shape are maintained (assuming no open strings). To get into this, take a look at a lesson a wrote awhile back: https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/drastically_reduce_learning_time_with_intervals_part_2.html

Good luck. If you're still really stuck, send me a message with your email, and I can send you some diagrams to explain this.