#1
As above. When you play covers, do you really have to make your guitar tone sound like the guitarist ? I felt depressed when my guitar doesn't sound like Tom Delonge's guitar tone and felt I am better off being a listener than a guitarist.
Amateur guitarist straight from the oven !




#2
Not in the least. Famous guitarists don't even have the same tone live as on the album. They use all kinds of different guitars and amps, different processing, mixing, they lay down multiple guitar tracks... almost nobody uses the same gear on stage as in the studio.

What matters is that you play something musically with the instruments and tones available to you. That may involve improving your technique or rearranging the guitar parts, or adapting non-guitar parts to your guitar. All things that make you a better musician.

When you're playing other people's music, your goal isn't to replicate or imitate the original, but to communicate the same thing with slightly different sounds (or use familiar song to communicate something of your own).
#3
Of course not. It can sound however you want it to sound. It is a cover after all..
#4
If all covers sounded like the original song, then why listen to the cover when one can listen to the original?

I don't know about anyone else here, but when I cover a song, I tend to add some notes here and there, mess with the sound (i.e. amp/pedal/guitar knobs)
#5
Unless you want to make a career of tribute playing, the answer is no. I don't much like the term "cover" I prefer "in the style of" or even looser "in the spirit of".

This thread reminded of the worst concert I ever went to - Peter, Paul and Mary. I was left thinking I should have saved my money by staying at home and listening to the record.
#6
Quote by Parac
If all covers sounded like the original song, then why listen to the cover when one can listen to the original?

I don't know about anyone else here, but when I cover a song, I tend to add some notes here and there, mess with the sound (i.e. amp/pedal/guitar knobs)

^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Took the words right out of my mouth (well... fingers)
#7
I agree with all of the above. I have been playing in cover bands for many (many!) years. The point isn't to sound exactly like the original, it's for your band to sound like "your band" sounds doing a cover of a popular song. I like Tony's description of "in the spirit of". That's an excellent choice of words. People who come to see your band don't expect you to be note for note, tone for tone like the song you are covering.

A "Tribute" band's goal is to duplicate the sound, look and overall production of a popular band. I have seen some excellent tribute bands Eaglemainia (Eagles), Musical Box (Genesis), Physical Graffiti (Led Zep), Live Wire (AC/DC) and others and admire what they do and the hard work and effort that goes into it. It easier to sound like "you" than EVH, Page or any other well known player. Those bands are trying to be clones of the original and it's not an easy thing to do.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#8
Exactly as above ^

Cover = Your take on a song

Tribute = You better get every little detail right.
#11
Quote by Stuck_nomore
As above. When you play covers, do you really have to make your guitar tone sound like the guitarist ? I felt depressed when my guitar doesn't sound like Tom Delonge's guitar tone and felt I am better off being a listener than a guitarist.


no, you don't really have to but i try to. to me it just makes sense but i don't over do it. i can come pretty close to most guitar tones that interest me and i'm ok with that.

it always seems like a disappointment when someone covers a tune and they're not even in the same key nor tuning, and the phrasing is all wrong, and then they whip out "free bird" right in the middle. too much artistic license isn't always a good thing. imo, i think it has to be right enough to be identifiable and to make sense not as a springboard to wank off. just watch the crowd react to their favorite song played badly and wrong, they'll pretty much go away.

that being said though if you have the artistic "credibility" to pull off a tune sounding "your way" then go for it. famous performers do it all the time.

oth, playing chuck berry covers with a triple rect. cranked to ten could be interesting...
Last edited by ad_works at Feb 19, 2016,
#12
I wish I could play exactly as the artists do on albums. That being said as long as the tune is recognizable and I can make people tap their feet I'm content.
#14
While I think it's important to keep your own identity when doing covers, I also think it's important to recognize and duplicate as close as possible on certain iconic songs and phrases. Take for example the George Harrison song "Something". That song is so recognizeable that it will be obvious to everyone in the audience that its a poor replication of the song if you deviate too far.

Most other songs, not so much. But even on those other songs there are typical identifiable sounds and phrases that people key in on that you need to ensure you capture to some degree for it to be a satisfying and appreciable experience for your audience.
#15
I always liked to sound like me.My tone.People like to hear a different take on a cover.As long as it's good that's what matters.
#16
it goes beyond covers or even tribute bands...now the Eagles do not have the same people in the band as when they recorded Hotel CA...and try as they may..the classic ending solo is going to be different..

on the other side..is something like Hendrix doing All Along the Watchtower..talk about fleshing out a skeleton
play well

wolf
#17
It's not possible for a cover band to duplicate every sound of all the bands they cover. To do a four hour gig you will be playing at least 40-50 songs a night. Some songs will have been recorded with single coil pickup guitars, humbuckers, acoustics, hollow bodies, semi-hollows, solid bodies... you get the idea. Then there are the various amp configurations and effects. It's not possible to duplicate all those tones for every song on a gig and nobody expects you to change your entire sound in the 15-30 seconds you have between songs. You just do the best you can with what you have. Just get as good an overall tone as you can and do your best. A lot of it is your hands and trying to get close to the unique technique of each artist or band. This is the reason I am usually a proponent of guitars and amps that are not just one "trick pony's" only designed for one particular type of sound. You need equipment that can recreate any sound or at least can do a little of everything. If your guitar and equipment limits you to one genre of music your ability to play in various bands and various styles is limited.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Feb 21, 2016,
#18
i like start from scratch when doing covers. I prefer to record the bass, the guitar, and even keyboard. if original tracks aren't available for me from the band to mix, then i will overlay my guitar over a song.

my philosophy when doing covers is, you don't have to get the instrument you are recording to sound identical to the original, but try to mix it identically if you can
#19
I've played in cover bands since about 1968. Off and on... I like to get as close as I can, but I don't stress over it. In most cases, at least with the classic rock and blues stuff we're doing, I can do a convincing job with my rig, and I have 4 guitars I bring onstage if I want a different sound or if one drops out of tune. Can't stand retuning onstage.

Most of the time, switching guitars makes a lot of difference, at least to me, since I have a really good ear and can pick out the minor differences from one guitar to the next, so I try a different one every time I play a new song until I find that one guitar just works best. Otherwise my Strat can handle most of them without any problems, switching to a different pickup is usually the biggest change I have to make.

I don't use a lot of effects - delay, overdrive and distortion, and a phase shifter that sometimes never even gets turned on. Other times I'll use it once a night. In some cases I'll also set up two amps, one a little brighter than the other, and get a wider range of tones. If I'm bringing the Super Reverb already, that thing is almost 90lbs, the 30lb Pro Jr is not big or heavy, so it's not a big deal to lug it in. The A/B switch is already on the pedal board, all I have to do is run an extra cable.

I also always bring the acoustic, we do a lot of Eagles and America and some Doobie Brothers that needs acoustic, I probably use it a dozen songs a night.

In general, it's not too hard to get close to the original with just the Super Reverb and pedal board, even if I don't have all the guitars handy, like at band practice. Then I just set up the Pro Jr, one guitar (strat usually) and distortion pedal (Ibanez SD 9). That covers a whole lot more range than you may realize. I set the SD 9 at a low gain setting, and the amp by itself does a good job of clean sound, with just that basic rig it handles 90% of what we do pretty well.

Getting the details of the song right makes more difference than the guitar sound, get that close and you're OK. Always get the chords right. And the lyrics. If it has harmony vocals, try to get those right. Lead guitar parts...sometimes I want to get it note for note, like Sultans of Swing or Rockin Down the Highway (Doobie Brothers) or New Kid In Town (Eagles). For others, I often get the first few seconds right then improvise. I don't know how to explain it, some songs just sound like the lead just grew there. Then I have to get as close as I can. Other times it sounds like it can vary so I don't worry too much about it. Pink Floyd songs, for example, David Gilmour tinkered with is leads until he got them just right and that's what went on the record, and he usually duplicates it almost exactly onstage. Clapton, on the other hand, almost never does the same thing two nights in a row. The Eagles usually do things mostly note for note, with a few variations here and there on leads, especially those Joe Walsh plays, so I try to get their stuff as close as possible, ditto for Doobie Brothers. If they went to the trouble to get it right then duplicate it onstage, I can at least try.

And you can forget about nailing someone's tone exactly, you'd have to have his fingers for that...half your tone is in your fingers.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
Last edited by Paleo Pete at Feb 21, 2016,
#20
I like a cover to have originality to it, if y'know what I mean. Creating an exact photocopy of a song can be fun; there's a time and a place for it. But aren't the best covers you've ever heard strikingly different from the original?

Try this when you have some time and feel like experimenting a bit. Google the name of an artist with whom you are only vaguely familiar. Select a song by them, any song that you have never heard before, find the lyrics to it. Then compose, yourself, an arrangement for it. After you're satisfied with what you've come up with, find and listen to the original just to see how different it is from your own.

As an aside: Ever contemplate the odd fact that taking someone else's lyrics and putting your own music to it is a cover version or an artistic arrangement whereas taking someone else's music and putting your lyrics to it is plagiarism.
#21
Quote by cdgraves

What matters is that you play something musically with the instruments and tones available to you. That may involve improving your technique or rearranging the guitar parts, or adapting non-guitar parts to your guitar. All things that make you a better musician.

When you're playing other people's music, your goal isn't to replicate or imitate the original, but to communicate the same thing with slightly different sounds (or use familiar song to communicate something of your own).


I'm in a cover band, and I approve of this message.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#22
You never have to do anything specific in music, ever. But I think for a performance, you want the crowd to enjoy whatever it is you're doing, so it needs to be "good" whatever that is. People need to like it, basically.

If you play exactly the same as the song, people will like that to some degree for sure. If you change things, you are taking a risk of disappointing people, or making something they find interesting but different, or maybe something they like better.

If you change the recipe you'll want to know what you're doing, because you're changing a good recipe. You could butcher it.

For me personally, I would never play anything exactly the same. I wouldn't even learn any of the exact parts.

For you, idk what level you're at, how your improvisation is, etcetera. So, idk what I'd recommend.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Feb 23, 2016,
#23
Quote by fingrpikingood
If you play exactly the same as the song, people will like that to some degree for sure. If you change things, you are taking a risk of disappointing people, or making something they find interesting but different, or maybe something they like better.

For me personally, I would never play anything exactly the same. I wouldn't even learn any of the exact parts.



I agree with this. As a cover band you need to consider how far you can stray from the original and still keep your audience interested. As a musician you also want enough room for your own "take" on the song but still do it in the same style of the original. I rarely (if ever) learn a lead note for note or try to replicate a certain tone but I will learn the proper rhythm and chord inversions because I think in many songs it's the chord inversions that define the sound. It's not always true but 98% of the time it is. Playing the right changes and inversions is often the thing that identifies a song to your audience and is also a major learning experience for the players.

It also depends on your audience and what they will approve or disapprove of. My band has four clubs/bars that we rotate to every month and each place has a different expectation. Half of the people in the place are people who follow us and half are the regular traffic for that establishment. You have to please both or you don't come back.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Feb 23, 2016,
#24
Quote by fingrpikingood

For me personally, I would never play anything exactly the same. I wouldn't even learn any of the exact parts.
.


Yeah. That's the way I look at it. I try to figure out the groove and headspace the original is playing in. The Changes. Then I just do my own thing with it. Sometimes it comes out similar, but never the same.