#1
Hi,
So am 16 and been into the whole shred thing for over one year now, practicing countless of hours. And now getting pretty good at it. But I've been on holiday for a couple of days and I've listened to a lot more music. And I've find myself still listening to the bands that inspired me to play and simply what I like to listen to. Before I thought playing fast was the only mission and that makes you a good guitarist. The bands guitar parts I liked before are a lot simpler and melodic, but just sounds nicer than ripping up and down scales.

Just thought I'd share this.
Thanks!
🍗🎹🎶🎼🎧🎤🎮👾🎸🎨🎷⚽️🎱🏁🎺🎻🍮🍰🍪📱👻🐔🐣🐥🐤🐽🐷💀👽💩💸🚽👻
#2
So, you don't have any questions or anything? That's fine, discussion is always cool too.

I had that shred thing at 16 too, but I never got good at it to begin with. I'm getting faster all the time, sure, but I can't do like Paul Gilbert stuff or things like that.

Personally, I'd like to start developing some horn player inspired stuff, jazz saxophonists and trumpet players can really "shred" while staying interesting. Speed and technical ability is really important in my opinion, I mean it's a part of good musicianship. The problem is that a lot of metal and rock guitarists just have no idea about what to do and that usually results in boring scale runs and such, while you can find beautiful, fast stuff in genres like jazz and country.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#3
Part of me still likes it but the other don't. Guess it's putting the two together is the real challenge.
🍗🎹🎶🎼🎧🎤🎮👾🎸🎨🎷⚽️🎱🏁🎺🎻🍮🍰🍪📱👻🐔🐣🐥🐤🐽🐷💀👽💩💸🚽👻
#4
Quote by Guitar137335
Hi,
So am 16 and been into the whole shred thing for over one year now, practicing countless of hours. And now getting pretty good at it. But I've been on holiday for a couple of days and I've listened to a lot more music. And I've find myself still listening to the bands that inspired me to play and simply what I like to listen to. Before I thought playing fast was the only mission and that makes you a good guitarist. The bands guitar parts I liked before are a lot simpler and melodic, but just sounds nicer than ripping up and down scales.

Just thought I'd share this.
Thanks!


Well, I went through the same, though a lot older, and had ridiculously good technique, and pretty poor musicality. Hand/arm injuries put paid to shredding for a long time, and so I concentrated on musicality (improved my knowledge of music, my phrasing, melodic playing etc, at much slower speeds, and in different settings ... got into a cross between jazz and metal later). Way more fun (I was lucky enough to become close friends with and study with the best guitarist in the UK at that time, Shaun Baxter).

I listened to lots of Jazz, transcribed lots of sax and piano solos (bebop, modal), and analysed them with the theoretical knowledge I had.

So now, I can do all the flash stuff, but I don't use that very much. As I got older, and worked with other musicians, I was continually reminded of the old saying "less is more" ... that is very true.

So, great to hear you're expanding your horizons ... there are a ton of amazing sounds out there tio be had, and adapted.
#5
+1 on Kevatuhri's post. I too am listening to horn players a bit more now especially tenor sax. I think because they have to pause and take a breath they tend to play very concise and conscious runs with very melodic phrasing and are more sympathetic in relation to the main melody. There are some (many) players who just go into a "jazz coma" and just start running scales but other times I find myself jealous of some horn players.

I'm not sure that made any sense but it moves me more than shred like runs on any instrument.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#6
Yeah I also think that horns are much less "symmetrical", you know on guitar you can just memorize some patterns and start shredding like crazy without thinking, but trumpet players especially have to think about what they play real carefully, which imo makes some of the best trumpet players out there sound so great. They can't just stick to some 3nps scales or pentatonic boxes, which is often the downfall of beginning guitarists.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#7
Quote by Guitar137335
Hi,
So am 16 and been into the whole shred thing for over one year now, practicing countless of hours. And now getting pretty good at it. But I've been on holiday for a couple of days and I've listened to a lot more music. And I've find myself still listening to the bands that inspired me to play and simply what I like to listen to. Before I thought playing fast was the only mission and that makes you a good guitarist. The bands guitar parts I liked before are a lot simpler and melodic, but just sounds nicer than ripping up and down scales.

Just thought I'd share this.
Thanks!


I wouldn't call shred 'just ripping up and down scales' though. It's good to diversify in your playing, to try different styles.
#8
I find it helpful to distinguish between what I admire and what I like. - I admire bebop and I like modern flamenco, for example. I think shredding is useful, but it is only a means to a musical end, it is not an end in itself and it occurs in many genres and ages - Latin "bravura" for example, which simply means "showing off". This is one of my all-time favourites:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_J_q0ly7sQE

It was recorded in 1928, with Lonnie Johnson playing a Mexican 12-string. At 1:03 he plays an eight-note scalar run in less than 0.5 seconds; I checked it in Cool Edit. - Just to show that he can do it, and on a rough old 12 string designed to be played by an orangutan. I think that is how shredding should be used, and I could offer many other examples.

So, keep on working on the shredding by all means, but apply those skills to the things you really like.
#9
Shredding is a technique...one of many. And it's a good one to have in your arsenal. But so are double stops, double bends, harmonic scale climbing, jazz coloration chords, funk/soul dissonance, combined pick and finger techniques, chicken pickin' or octave leads and many other techniques. It's like the old saying, "If all you have is a hammer, everything starts to look like a nail".
#10
Quote by Tony Done
Just to show that he can do it, and on a rough old 12 string designed to be played by an orangutan.


Now that is a harsh assessment on the quality of a guitar!
#11
not sure i'm ever gonna grow out of it
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#12
Go with your heart.You can always come back to the shreddy stuff later.I'm currently into jazz.Something i'd never have imagined at 16.The more different stuff you learn the better.Take your journey wherever your heart leads you and it will shape you as a musician.Imo
#13
If you really want to get to the heart of the matter and get simple, try out some Johnny Cash.... "Don't Take Your Guns To Town", "Ring OF Fire" are a couple of my favs.

If Open G is your thing: Stones. Tumbling Dice and Honky Tonk Woman.

If you can play the real simple stuff really really well, you're on to something....

All the above songs are so simple you almost don't need a fretting hand to play them.
#14
Quote by TobusRex
Now that is a harsh assessment on the quality of a guitar!


I'm a big fan of Lonnie Johnson, greatly under-appreciated, IMO.

If you listen to the tune carefully you will hear what seems to be a deliberate buzzy sound every now and then. I spent months trying to figure out what he was doing, and finally realised it is only one note. It must just be a buzzy fret that he worked into the melody.

This might be the guitar in question:



Not for the faint-hearted
#15
I think at one point we all work so hard towards one goal that it kills the desire for it and we move on to other styles or techniques. The knowledge you gain should never be lost though--keep up on all those things you have learned or one day you might need it and curse yourself.As long as you are learning something, you'll be fine. Never stop learning.Thats my goal.
Quote by Parac
how does sound have a color?


It can also have texture and taste and weight-heavy light smooth crunchy bright muddy dark round sweet sour soft hard harsh brittle shimmering thin thick fat balanced scooped thumping silky ........
#17
I'm the opposite, never liked or had any desire to shred. Melodic and catchy riffs is what I like.
#18
im currently in the shred phase and its ridiculously fun to play really fast and is a great boost to motivation the fact that i can even reach speeds that fast. i started out on guitar 3 months ago like a noob and my goal was to play the final unison to dream theater's this dying soul, which i did and even have a video of. i plan to do more fast solos soon because they are so much fun and are rewarding
Last edited by sourcegamer101 at Feb 22, 2016,
#19
Quote by sourcegamer101
im currently in the shred phase and its ridiculously fun to play really fast and is a great boost to motivation the fact that i can even reach speeds that fast. i started out on guitar 3 months ago like a noob and my goal was to play the final unison to dream theater's this dying soul, which i did and even have a video of. i plan to do more fast solos soon because they are so much fun and are rewarding


Well keep hold of that video and watch it in a year or two's time. I did the same for my first open mic and, although at the time I thought I played really well and my solo was fantastic, I now I look back and cringe as I have a much better ear, sense of rhythm and technique. Peoples ideas of 'good' change as they become more adept at playing.
#20
Quote by Dave_Mc
not sure i'm ever gonna grow out of it


i never totally did . shredding isn't my strong suit playing wise but i still like to burn a lick here and there. i still love to play fast but it has to be part of the song and needed rather than non stop.
#21
yeah. i mean, i probably have matured a little (citation needed ), although even at the start I always preferred the melodic shred than the just letting rip for the sake of it stuff, but I still do like shredding when it's done well- alongside feel etc..
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#22
To me, shredding isn't so much of anything really. It's just good playing. Being in the moment and channelling something larger than yourself. It really starts with just getting back to basic feeling the rhythm and then riding the wave.

When I'm actually playing, not practicing, BPM doesn't matter. I could gather together a whole bunch of notes at whatever speed you want. Or just have some nice, well timed notes. It's really about getting small and simple.
#23
Around that age I too was a wanna be shredder. Now I am a wannabe fingerpicker. I only wish I started focusing on fingerpicking from the beginning. Oh well I have some catching up to do but my progress is happening quite rapidly and a big part of that is my teacher.

As far what makes someone a good guitarist 100% is dependent on your dedication and time spent practicing. If you want to be shredder shred, you want to be a fingerpicker then fingerpick, and so on. Don't expect one genre to make you better in another. For instance and this is my personal opinion: Mic Mars was a trained classical guitar player and I still find him a mediocre guitar player.
***************Sig***************
Taylor 314 & GS Mini & Martin LX1
#24
Quote by fingerguy
Around that age I too was a wanna be shredder. Now I am a wannabe fingerpicker. I only wish I started focusing on fingerpicking from the beginning. Oh well I have some catching up to do but my progress is happening quite rapidly and a big part of that is my teacher.

As far what makes someone a good guitarist 100% is dependent on your dedication and time spent practicing. If you want to be shredder shred, you want to be a fingerpicker then fingerpick, and so on. Don't expect one genre to make you better in another. For instance and this is my personal opinion: Mic Mars was a trained classical guitar player and I still find him a mediocre guitar player.


finger guy, I've got a version of Doc Watson's Deep River Blues at my soundcloud link. Also Chet Atkins "Drive In" is a great tune for fingerpicking. Not too complicated.
#25
Quote by edg
To me, shredding isn't so much of anything really. It's just good playing. Being in the moment and channelling something larger than yourself. It really starts with just getting back to basic feeling the rhythm and then riding the wave.

When I'm actually playing, not practicing, BPM doesn't matter. I could gather together a whole bunch of notes at whatever speed you want. Or just have some nice, well timed notes. It's really about getting small and simple.


Sounds, to me, more like you are describing phrasing.
For example, IMO, Gilmore is great at phrasing but I don't think I'd label him a shredder.
#27
Shredding shouldnt be frowned upon. Shredding is my favorite thing to do. Successfully executing a major scale run makes me happy. There is good shredding and bad shredding.

Good shredding is John Coltrane. Plays very fast, but very articulate. Creates lots of movement and throws in surprises.

Bad shredding is when the guitarist plays C B A C B A C B A C B A G A G A G A G A G A G A C B A C B A C B A and then bends a G back up to the A and holds it, then FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE then wanks some blues licks then pick scrapes for 15 seconds while running around on stage like a chicken with no head.
#28
^ aw come on, i forgot where i was on stage that time
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?