#1
I'm a bit confused. I'm following an online course. The book provided shows a pattern of 16th notes and says to play them at 100 bpm. But it's taking me months and I'm just stuggling to go beyond 85, and the course says I should have moved on after 4 weeks!

In the lecture the guy says I should play the pattern at 8th notes. May be he meant 16ths?


How fast is enough for the average guitarist?
#3
Fast enough for what? What are you trying to do?

Playing scales fast only makes you good at playing scales fast, you need to find a way to apply what you're learning to make actual music.
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#4
What is enough has everything to do with what you want to be able to play. And I'm talking about music, not exercises. If the music you want to play doesn't use 16ths in faster tempos than 100 bpm, then yes, 100 bpm is enough.

Speed comes over time. It's not good to force it. That will just teach you bad habits. When you practice anything, make sure you are doing it correctly. If it feels hard, slow it down. That way you will figure out what is causing the problem and only that way you can fix it. If you never fix it, you'll learn bad habits that are hard to get rid of.
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#5
Quote by ----zero----
I'm a bit confused. I'm following an online course. The book provided shows a pattern of 16th notes and says to play them at 100 bpm. But it's taking me months and I'm just stuggling to go beyond 85, and the course says I should have moved on after 4 weeks!

In the lecture the guy says I should play the pattern at 8th notes. May be he meant 16ths?


How fast is enough for the average guitarist?

I like to keep track of speed by figuring out the number of notes per second you are playing.

16th notes is 4 notes per click.

85bpm x 4 / 60 = roughly 5.5 notes per second.

For comparison purposes, Buckethead was clocke at 13.5 notes per second in an old guitar world magazine.

Make sure the grip you have on your pick is natural. Make it simple. I like to keep my hand open for flexibility. Buckethead and many others pick with a closed right hand. Make sure your up strokes are identical in form to your downstrokes. Practice with just downstrokes and then just up strokes. I like to double pick the notes to build speed. Like 1-1-3-3-5-5-7-7-. Make sure you are using your thumb and first finger like a pencil and not just using your wrist to pick. But don't only use your fingers, it's mostly wrist, but the finger help accent and they make minor adjustments to keep it clean. Make note of the angle of your pick, both ways. Like if your pick is this letter "V" and the string is this "___" the angle created by pushing the top of the "V" foreword or pulling it back, and if you turned it by grabbing either side perpendicular to the string.

That's all I got...
#6
honestly, speed comes in time man. Dont stress about it. JUST practice and make sure u can play comfortably and cleanly. Don't feel pressure about how fast you can play a scale. Learning scales is important, but make sure you are learning music as well!
#8
Just keep up the metronome work. 100bpm isn't crazy, but anything beyond your current abilities will be challenging. I'm sure you can safely move onto other concepts.

Remember that a lot of people who study music formally learn technique and reading very early on, so faster tempos are not much of a problem. Most academic curricula will be written for people who learned mechanics before music.
Last edited by cdgraves at Feb 21, 2016,
#9
Probably too much tension. Can you tap your fingers in the table, one after the other, starting from the index and finishing on the pinky? Can you do this fairly quickly without thinking? If you can then you can do it on guitar (a chromatic exercise), you just need to develop it. Start slowly, I probably wouldn't even bother picking. Just get the motion down in your subconscious. To begin with don't even use any pressure, just lightly touch the strings. You can add pressure later.

Hope this helps.
#10
Personally, I think that anything that tells you where you should be at a given time, or how long it should take to learn something simply isn't a very good resource.

How fast is enough for the average guitarist? Well, how do you define an average guitarist? There are lots of different guitarists out there. Not to mention all the different styles and genres. Basically, all you have to do is ask yourself these questions: "Is this fast enough for me?" "Do I want to go faster?"
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#11
Right hand speed is just a tool for music, one of many tools. Take it at your pace, not anyone else's.
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#12
Quote by ----zero----
I'm a bit confused. I'm following an online course. The book provided shows a pattern of 16th notes and says to play them at 100 bpm. But it's taking me months and I'm just stuggling to go beyond 85, and the course says I should have moved on after 4 weeks!

In the lecture the guy says I should play the pattern at 8th notes. May be he meant 16ths?


How fast is enough for the average guitarist?


The sky's the limit if you ask me. Get it as fast as you can get it as long as it doesn't start to sound sloppy and out of control - be honest with your self when you practise. Also bear in mind that fast scales up and down can sound incredibly boring. Getting some feel into the playing is essential but I'm sure you know that.
#13
Something to keep in mind is that you need to improve *the way* you pick in order to reach high speeds. It's not just a case of gritting your teeth and trying harder. Work on efficiency by reducing your picking movements and fretting hand movements. 16th notes at 100bpm is not very fast compared to a typical rock guitarist. Try the 'Paul Gilbert alternate picking exercise', which is six notes per beat using two strings. It really gets to the core of alternate picking.