#1
Hi UG community. I've been playing the guitar for quite some time now and there is this one thing that I really can't get to do efficiently.

It's a picking problem (I believe) I can descend 3 notes or 6 notes per string across the board with no problem at 180 - 200 ish. Problem is when I try to ascend my right hand just can't do the job.

What could be wrong or what exercise can I do to alleviate the error?
#2
There could be any number of things wrong, and sadly it's pretty much impossible to tell what's going on without actually seeing you play. Unless you can get a video up on youtube showing us then there's not much anyone can say for definite. That said... there are some guidelines:

1 - The idea that your right hand "can't keep up" isn't exactly wrong... but it is flawed. You shouldn't really be speeding ahead to the point where you find that one hand or other is messing up. On the whole you should be keeping to speeds where your hands can both do what you need and working from there. Some people swear by doing speed bursts, but there's a lot of confusion and misinformation about that idea around so I don't like talking about it very much; besides which there are people much better equipped to talk about it anyway.

2 - Relax. Relax your whole body. I know it's not easy but playing guitar is a holistic thing and if you've got a tense leg or whatever it can actually affect what your hands are doing. So slow down and make sure you're as relaxed as possible at all speeds you're working on.

3 - Make your motions smaller. Again, this is difficult but it's one of the major components of being able to play fast. You don't need to move quickly, you need to move less. Again, this is going to require that you really slow down, to a point where you're not using muscle memory any more and you can really control every little thing you're doing. That is going to be slooooooooow, really seriously slow, like probably so slow that a metronome is pointless. It's tedious sometimes, and takes a lot of work, but if you can work on it consistently (say 20-30 minutes a day even) you will see results.

Again, these are just general guidelines and not the absolute be-all-end-all of what you need to do; only someone who can see you play can tell you that. They're good starting points though.

Good luck!

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#3
Quote by bamlethal
Hi UG community. I've been playing the guitar for quite some time now and there is this one thing that I really can't get to do efficiently.

It's a picking problem (I believe) I can descend 3 notes or 6 notes per string across the board with no problem at 180 - 200 ish. Problem is when I try to ascend my right hand just can't do the job.

What could be wrong or what exercise can I do to alleviate the error?


What are you complaining about? That's way faster than I can comfortably practice. Plus I don't even practice near those speeds. I tend to be skeptical of these kinds of claims here. Do you have a recording or vid we can watch so we can assess better?

Another thing I would add, is you should focus less on speed and more on just playing.
#4
Quote by edg
What are you complaining about? That's way faster than I can comfortably practice. Plus I don't even practice near those speeds. I tend to be skeptical of these kinds of claims here. Do you have a recording or vid we can watch so we can assess better?

Another thing I would add, is you should focus less on speed and more on just playing.


Well he didn't even state whether he is talking 16ths, 8th, quarters, etc. So I don't know how fast/slow he's picking.
#5
Quote by SpiderM
Well he didn't even state whether he is talking 16ths, 8th, quarters, etc. So I don't know how fast/slow he's picking.


Tis true. Usually I assume it 16th if not stated explicitly.

EDIT. Main Point: stop worrying about the speed of the metronome and make sure you're on beat accurately at whatever it is you're practicing.
Last edited by edg at Feb 22, 2016,
#6
Try practising your scales backwards so that you concentrate on the hard direction first then go back again. I notice students always have more difficulty descending the scale (that is what you mean right?) so I get them to play it the other way first. It gives your brain something to think about and automatically prioritises it so after a while it should even out up and down the scale.

Good luck with it.