#1
I want to straighten my neck a bit more but I'm not sure how much force I can use without breaking anything.

I'm using a small hex key and I'm only using my thumb and finger to turn. I've seen people use big wrenches and that seems like it would be a lot more force.

I've turned it maybe 180 degrees now and the neck isn't much straighter, how much more is safe to turn?

Thank you.
#2
Well if you're turning it then you know how much force to use. Some are tighter than others.

Only 1/4 turn at a time max. Tune back up. Let it sit for hours. Repeat.
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#3
If you can turn it with thumb and finger, you might just be taking up slack, hence no visible improvement. I have applied a significant force that requires a firm grip on the hex wrench, or the heel of my hand. A quarter turn at a time is good. So far I've only broken one truss rod, YMMV.
#4
I hear a sound from somewhere when I rock the guitar back and forth. It seems to have disappeared when I loosened the truss rod again.. WTF? Could it really be that loose?
The relief is .015 at 8th fret with capo on first and last fret.

Some people say you should measure from 16-17th fret, some say last fret, what is best?

It's a Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plustop PRO btw.
Last edited by mpa984 at Feb 22, 2016,
#5
before just randomly turning the trus rod to straighten the neck, do some research by google answers or watch youtube videos how to do it, you don't want to ruin the trus rod and have a guitar tech repair a mistake you made as well as straighten the neck.

befor you do anything, do you own a straight edge ruler, long enough to see whether the neck is straight. look for Dan Erlewine's video tutorial and/ or buy his book. http://www.danerlewine.com/

http://www.stewmac.com/Luthier_Tools/StewMac_Tool_Sets/Basic_Setup_Kit.html - basic setup kit... I'm thinking about buying a kit myself

my guitar tech told me he clamp the neck to a straight block and let it sit for a day with loose trus rod.
I have Washburn guitars 'Maverick Series' and bass 'Bantam Series' and a few pedals and amps, but man I wish to have more patience and drive practicing my playing, if it's equal to the modding itch, then I'm golden.
Last edited by psp742 at Feb 22, 2016,
#6
Quote by psp742
before just randomly turning the trus rod to straighten the neck, do some research by google answers or watch youtube videos how to do it, you don't want to ruin the trus rod and have a guitar tech repair a mistake you made as well as straighten the neck.

befor you do anything, do you own a straight edge ruler, long enough to see whether the neck is straight. look for Dan Erlewine's video tutorial and/ or buy his book. http://www.danerlewine.com/

http://www.stewmac.com/Luthier_Tools/StewMac_Tool_Sets/Basic_Setup_Kit.html - basic setup kit... I'm thinking about buying a kit myself

my guitar tech told me he clamp the neck to a straight block and let it sit for a day with loose trus rod.


Thanks for the link, I've been reading about how to setup guitar for 5 hours straight now. I'm not just randomly turning it. The relief on the neck was too much. I'm afraid to even touch it, but I did 1/4 turns 2 times and adjusted the bridge. It plays a lot better now, and less buzzing because I don't need to press the strings as hard.

I don't own a straight edge but I have feeler gauges and a capo.
#8
You can check the neck relief with the capo and feeler gauges.

Capo the first fret. With your left hand hold down the string at the fret where the neck meets the body (around 17 for most of mine). The string itself now makes a straight line between the 1st and 17th (whichever one for that guitar) fret.

Now measure with your feeler gauges at the 7th, 8th, and 9th frets. Most manufactures call for between 0.3mm - 0.5mm.

Adjust the truss rod as needed no more than 1/4 turn MAX at a time (i typically do less) and retune. It may take hours for the neck to settle in with the adjustment. Retune. Recheck. Readjust. Retune. Wait. Retune. Recheck. Readjust. etc.
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#9
Quote by mpa984
I hear a sound from somewhere when I rock the guitar back and forth. It seems to have disappeared when I loosened the truss rod again.. WTF? Could it really be that loose?
The relief is .015 at 8th fret with capo on first and last fret.

Some people say you should measure from 16-17th fret, some say last fret, what is best?

It's a Epiphone Les Paul Standard Plustop PRO btw.


you possibly have a compression rod not a two way truss rod. comp rods won't pitch a neck backward past a certain point, usually when the threads run out.

easy test. loosen the nut all the way until it comes off. if it comes off, this is a compression rod. and while you're at it, now is a time for a dab of clean grease -your pick. the tiniest amount on the nut face and on the threads. it will make things easier for a long time to come.

if the nut doesn't come out then you have a two way truss rod. these offer far more adjustability, enough to tame most any uncooperative neck.

measure from the 16th ~17th fret? nope. i will capo at the first and measure at frets 6, 7, & 8. fret the string at the body fret. the reason i measure at 3 frets is that i want to get a feel for where the low spot is on the neck. they aren't always in the same place.
Last edited by ad_works at Feb 23, 2016,