#1
This is probably going to be the wrong forum let alone area to post this thread in but.. Life goes on

So my question is this:

I've been playing guitar for a while now, slowly starting to put a set list together, with the band,of songs that we have written. I am by no means the singer in this band but it would be nice to be able to provide some backing vocals. Unfortunatly my voice is no where near up to scratch so it needs a lot of work.

This is where my problem comes in... How am I supposed to work on improving my voice when the voice that I actually hear coming out of my mouth sounds in tune but the voice I hear once recorded and played back is no where near in tune?

Am I just a hopeless case? 😂
#2
Ear training, that's all you can do. You have to learn to get an ear for intervals, which many singers do by practicing along to a piano. Play a C, sing a C. Play a D, sing a D. Then you get used to that whole-step jump between notes. It will give you perspective in how high you need to push.

A singer told me that when you're starting you always need to go higher than you think you need to and you never need to go as low as you think you need to. That helped me a bunch.

Also, this is the wrong forum. But fuck it. Thug life.
#4
I have the same problem. Get a set of headphones, use them as monitors when you sing and teach yourself to be in tune.

It's what I needed to do as well, as I have/had exactly the same problem as you describe, sounding in-tune to me, but not actually being in tune when recorded.

An EENT Dr. friend of mine told me it had to do with the acoustics of your head, which sounds weird but makes sense.

In-ear monitors will work as well, but headphones are far cheaper.

Good luck.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#5
Thanks both of you for your replys, they were extremely helpful!
Hopefully with a bit of ear training once a day I'll be hurting people's ears a lot less in the future 😀😀