#1
Boss TR-2 Tremolo pedal
MXR M-103 Blue Box pedal

I did a research on those pedals on Guitar Center and Youtube for a while and it seems they'll probably work for dance/techno/electronic music on my Ebony Epiphone Les Paul Custom Pro electric guitar. However, I was inspired by Motionless In White, Avicii and Lady Gaga to that kind of music, so it may be great for me to play. Please let me know what you think about the pedals. Thanks!

PS. Don't tell me it's from the amps because I already have a good amp head and cabinet to play on.
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#2
Dance/techno/electronic is a pretty wide umbrella. The tremolo will give you a tremolo effect, it will make the volume of the signal flutter, ranging from slow swells to erratic stutter (not sure how the boss handles that though). The blue box is an octave fuzz, it'll give you a distorted sound with an octave harmony. Do you think you need sounds like those? Do you have any example songs on what you want to achieve?
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#3
You are on the wrong instrument entirely to be doing anything electronica.

Not sure why you would need a tremolo. I cannot think of any part in any electronic music that would call for a tremolo effect. Maybe what you are thinking of is stutter or glitch. Those pedals are harder to find. Best thing for that effect is just to get a killswitch stompbox.

The Blue Box Fuzz is a better idea, though. It is an octave-below fuzz. You might also want an octave up fuzz or some form of octave up generation. An octavia fuzz (I have an EHX Octavix on the way to me) would help you out there.

Something like the Electro-Harmonix POG or Nano POG would be good too.

Delays and reverbs are often essential studio effects no matter what genre. I imagine you could use some dotted-eigths delays, so get a delay with tap tempo and subdivision.

Also EHX has some other fun pedals for keyboard simulation sounds. One I am thinking of in particular is the Key9. They also have some organ simulation pedals.

Having an octave-up whammy pedal of sorts is a good thing to have to get a digitized guitar sound for solos. You can also glitch-out your signal this way too, by overloading the whammy's tracking.

A Wah pedal is surprisingly useful for filter fade ins, you hear that kind of thing often in electronica tracks. Wah pedals do that really easily. Get something true bypass and with an LED.

The Roland GR-55 (With GK pickup) can do entire synth pads and leads by itself, although it is a hefty investment; but it is essentially having a synthesizer at your feet, with the guitar as the MIDI controller.

I know this because I wanted to do electronica stuff with my guitar, but I did not want to spend loads of money on it so I went with everything up to the GR-55 and the EHX Keys stuff. I still sound like a guitar, though, in all my efforts. Really if you want to do electronic music and do it well, get a proper keyboard MIDI controller, a solid DAW like Ableton, and load up on some VST instrument plugins.

And with that, what amp head and cabinet are you working with?
Last edited by Will Lane at Feb 23, 2016,
#5
1) there are electronic musicians who use or even prefer guitars and assorted pedals other devices for what they do. A buddy of mine in the DC area does. I know Moby has. Sidemen for Brian Eno have. I even caught some performances on the (now-defunct) G3 channel with guitarists manipulating their signals with things like KAOS pads.

So it can be done.

2) whether a particular instrument or attachment works for you or not depends on the piece you're playing.
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Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Feb 23, 2016,
#6
Just know, that in most electronica bands, the guitar takes the backseat as more of a rhythm role. Lead stuff usually comes out of synths, keys, etc. However, you can absolutely make electronica stuff with guitar.

In addition to what you've got lined up, look into:
-a wah and/or an evelope filter
-a bit crusher
-delay
-reverb
-Roland guitar synth
-more fuzz

Just curious, what amp are you using?
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#7
You really don't want to be using guitars for this. It's all about programming synths. In the old days it was Roland TR-808/909s for percussion and different programmable subtractive synths with sequencers and arpeggiators like the TB-303 and JP-8000/8080 and the like.

These days it's mostly done in DAWs like Logic, Cubase, Ableton, Pro Tools, or whatever people are using virtual instrument plugins that digitally model the 808, 303, and 8000 in addition to Moogs, ARPs, other Rolands, Korgs, whatever.

Programming gives you a lot more control over sound synth everything is MIDI based and makes use of sequencers and arpeggiators. This allows all kinds of sound changing after the MIDI has been programmed. It also allows things that are borderline impossible to play with absolutely inhuman precision.

And most importantly, there is absolutely no better substitute for a square or saw wave synth than a synth. It's just a sound that can't be nailed 100% with a guitar. You can get vaguely close to square wave and layered octave sounds, but it takes a lot of pedals and effort. And that doesn't even account for saws, sines, supersaws, etc.

Even then, you would be extremely hard pressed to duplicate arpeggiator and sequencer effects, especially rhythmic things like the classic trance gate sound. You also can't accurately create the sort of time synched filter effects (mostly Low Pass Filters modulated with Low Frequency Oscillators) or envelope filters that are use on pad sounds with a guitar.

Simply put, you can't do half of the the things that a basic synth does using a guitar and the things that you can do are significantly more difficult.

Quote by dannyalcatraz
1) there are electronic musicians who use or even prefer guitars and assorted pedals other devices for what they do.


There is a big difference between electronic music like Eno and Moby and electronic dance music, which is what TS is asking for despite not knowing the correct name (erroneously using techno as an umbrella when he means EDM and in all likeliness not techno specifically).

Obviously he wants EDM or synth pop, and there really aren't many EDM or synthpop artists/producers that make heavy use of guitars. The majority of it is all based on programmed softsynths.
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Last edited by theogonia777 at Feb 23, 2016,
#8
Using a DAW (ableton, cubase, logic) you can record your guitar and then add alot of virtual instruments/ effects/ modulation on it to make more electronica sounding. While I definitely see guitars used in electronic music they often add melody and rhythm in a more traditional way, but are used alongside of synthesizers and keyboards.

Maybe some specific examples of electronic artists who use guitars would help narrow down a sound.
#9
There is some EDM type stuff that incorporates real instruments, but the ones that do are use a lot of synths and DAW trickery.

Squarepusher makes use of real drums and bass, but also does crazy things to them uses drum samples, and uses tons of other electronic craziness as well.

Caravan Palace mixes swing and jazz with EDM using real instruments, lots of synths and programmed stuff, and using different filters or EQ or something to make some parts have that "old record" sound in juxtaposition with really polished, synthy, hard hitting bass type EDM stuff.

But yea, for the most part with electronic music real instruments are either simulated, are used in small roles, are sampled, etc. but if he wants to just add some odd effects to make his guitar have that kind of a sound nothing wrong with that.


For anyone who hasn't heard Caravan Palace before check them out, they're awesome.

https://youtu.be/yebo5ILBMC0
#10
I mean, it's not like they aren't used, but they are kind of secondary instruments while synth remains the meat and potatoes. It's similar to the use of sax or whatever in rock music. You certainly find it and it certainly can be used, but rock is guitar, bass, drums, vocals, and sometimes keyboards. Sax or fiddle or whatever is just an extra thing that sometimes is added.

EDM is the same way. It's all about synths for leads, pads, bass, percussion, etc.

TS seems to be looking to make those synth sounds out of a guitar, which is just not a practical way to go about it when it will be easier and cheaper and sound much better if you go throw the proper channels and do it with synths.
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#11
I know just the thing:





thank me after you make amazing nightcore
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#12
Have you considered a multi fx as opposed to separate pedals? I think if you want to make your guitar sound more "synthetic" your gonna want more than just a tremolo and a fuzz. Something like the Line 6 POD would give you both those effects plus a myriad of filters, modulations sand delays. Plus with one tap tempo to control everything, it would make it a lot easier to get all of the effects in sync and potential give you that EDM "pulse" feel.
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#13


I can't believe no one has brought this up yet,
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#14
Quote by N1ghtmar3C1n3ma


I can't believe no one has brought this up yet,

http://www.amazon.com/Ibanez-Kaoss-6-String-Electric-Guitar/dp/B00O5E50XE

Those units are okay but their practicality is heavily hindered. As well as they do not sound too good. A better option would be to put a kaoss pad on your own guitar rather than using that unit.

With that kind of stuff comes units like the HotHand and mounted trigger pads n' such. But really at that point you're trying to make a guitar be as close to a MIDI controller without actually being a MIDI controller itself.

I mean it is all doable, but practical and easily feasible? No. Just use a key controller and a DAW for electronic voicings, and let the guitar be the guitar.

Also, inb4 TS tells us they have a garbage amp. They have listed a Transtube and Micro Terror on their profile, definitely not an ideal platform.
Last edited by Will Lane at Feb 23, 2016,
#15
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I know just the thing:






My buddy in DC has one of those in his rig. He's planning an experimental interactive show soon, and will be sending me video. I hope the Miku gets to play a role.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#16
Quote by theogonia777
Simply put, you can't do half of the the things that a basic synth does using a guitar and the things that you can do are significantly more difficult.

There is a big difference between electronic music like Eno and Moby and electronic dance music, which is what TS is asking for despite not knowing the correct name (erroneously using techno as an umbrella when he means EDM and in all likeliness not techno specifically).

Obviously he wants EDM or synth pop, and there really aren't many EDM or synthpop artists/producers that make heavy use of guitars. The majority of it is all based on programmed softsynths.


OTOH, there are enough EDM guitarists out there for them to be a thing. Why discourage someone from following their creative path just because it is less traveled?

http://www.theuntz.com/news/top-10-edm-guitarists/
http://www.theuntz.com/news/top-10-edm-guitarists-page-2/
http://www.theuntz.com/news/top-10-edm-guitarists-page-3/
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#17
Quote by dannyalcatraz
My buddy in DC has one of those in his rig. He's planning an experimental interactive show soon, and will be sending me video. I hope the Miku gets to play a role.


I cant see how it wont
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#18
As has been mentioned you will struggle to make electronic music with a guitar and effects alone, however as soon as you get in to sampler and fx processor territory it is actually pretty easy and fun to integrate guitar - don't get me wrong though you are effectively gonna have to learn a new instrument. I'd suggest starting off by picking up a used Korg Kp3 (they can be found at a decent price) which will give you a huge number of sound mangling effects to play with as well as sampling and basic synth/drum sounds.

After that you might feel like you want to pick up a more fully fledged synth, sampler, drum machine etc to run as well but that will really depend on personal preference - worth playing around with software that has been mentioned too.

Personally think the KP3 sounds pretty sick on guitar for making synthy/weird sounds. Though beyond that I basically only use it for granular effects and delays on samples, just not the biggest fan of the other sounds - take it with a pinch of salt as Jon Hopkins performs whole sets on them.

Also while plenty of electronic music uses guitars (check Manual Gottsching's E2-E4) they are very uncommon in techno, though from that first post I'm not sure what you think techno is.
#19
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#20
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I know just the thing:





thank me after you make amazing nightcore

Link, please.
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#21
Quote by theogonia777
You really don't want to be using guitars for this.


Bit of a sweeping statement there. Look into 'Pendulum', I've seen them live a couple of times with real instruments. The Prodigy also do similar.
That's just 2 I know of.
#24
Quote by SpiderM
Bit of a sweeping statement there. Look into 'Pendulum', I've seen them live a couple of times with real instruments. The Prodigy also do similar.
That's just 2 I know of.


And I could literally list EDM artists for days that don't use guitars and instead use entirely synthesizers for everything other than vocals and occasional samples.
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#25
Quote by theogonia777
And I could literally list EDM artists for days that don't use guitars and instead use entirely synthesizers for everything other than vocals and occasional samples.


That's fine (so could I) but maybe you should consider changing the wording in your first post from 'You really don't want to be using guitars for this" to something like 'they are not used very often for this style' .
#26
Exactly.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#27
Quote by SpiderM
maybe you should consider changing the wording in your first post


I don't think so. I don't see how it's so offensive to tell someone not to do something in some overly complicated and unorthodox way when using conventional methods would yield better results with greater ease and at a lesser cost (of course, using plug-ins for guitar effects would negate cost differences).

It's like if someone was asking about scuba gear so they could go underwater and scoop fish out of a lake with a little hand net. Not a great way to fish when you can just use a rod. Even just running trotlines or something is a much better method.
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#28
I think I agree with Theogonia's statment of "You really don't want to be using guitars for this", by interpreting this way: Guitars are not ideal, it is easier to use the conventional method of synths and daws and whatnot. You can use guitars for it. But it is easier in to use the conventional method. Of course that may or may not be how others interpreted it.

And as stated above, there are units that will help a guitar sound like a synthesized instrument (some by synthesizing the guitar itself). But without the units like the GR-55/GK pickup, you are often going to sound like a guitar emulating a synth. It can be and probably will be more trouble that it is worth.

I think it is the same principle on why we suggest certain amps for certain styles. Sure you can make a VOX do metal (ugh), although a 6505 will do it better.

Now TS can choose to stay on this path which is fine. We have listed many units to help out in this regard. But the conventional method is the method most traveled for a reason.
Last edited by Will Lane at Feb 25, 2016,
#29
Quote by Will Lane
I think I agree with Theogonia's statment of "You really don't want to be using guitars for this", by interpreting this way: Guitars are not ideal, it is easier to use the conventional method of synths and daws and whatnot. You can use guitars for it. But it is easier in to use the conventional method. Of course that may or may not be how others interpreted it.

And as stated above, there are units that will help a guitar sound like a synthesized instrument (some by synthesizing the guitar itself). But without the units like the GR-55/GK pickup, you are often going to sound like a guitar emulating a synth. It can be and probably will be more trouble that it is worth.

I think it is the same principle on why we suggest certain amps for certain styles. Sure you can make a VOX do metal (ugh), although a 6505 will do it better.

Now TS can choose to stay on this path which is fine. We have listed many units to help out in this regard. But the conventional method is the method most traveled for a reason.



Well I've got my opinion across and so have you guys, so I'm sure the TS can make his/her informed decision.

The reason I commented is that personally I would like to move into some Pendulum (live) type stuff with my guitar and, if I was new to guitar, the earlier post from theogonia777 may have stopped me perusing this idea as it stated 'it was not the right instrument'. I never said it was offensive, I am just putting my opinion accross on a forum
I do agree with other posts stating it may not be the main instrument.

Will Lane, by your comments, I think you have assumed that we are talking about using a guitar to emulate the sound of another instrument. This is not the case, I am talking about electonic music with the addition of a definite guitar sound (such as pendulum, some prodigy, some orbital, some chemical brothers etc).

Peace out
Last edited by SpiderM at Feb 25, 2016,
#30
Quote by SpiderM
Will Lane, by your comments, I think you have assumed that we are talking about using a guitar to emulate the sound of another instrument. This is not the case, I am talking about electonic music with the addition of a definite guitar sound (such as pendulum, some prodigy, some orbital, some chemical brothers etc).


No, we were talking about using a guitar to emulate other instruments. Why else would TS be asking if octave fuzz and tremolo (ie effects that could be perceived as giving guitar more of a synth sound since synths commonly have octave layers and dynamic modulation) are good effects for his guitar for electronic/techno/dance sounds?
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#31
Well since TS hasn't responded to any of our posts we can't know exactly what their goals were, either synthesized sounds from a guitar or supporting guitar in a electronic track.

The first is what I have been talking about; the second is a completely different discussion.
#32
Quote by theogonia777
No, we were talking about using a guitar to emulate other instruments. Why else would TS be asking if octave fuzz and tremolo (ie effects that could be perceived as giving guitar more of a synth sound since synths commonly have octave layers and dynamic modulation) are good effects for his guitar for electronic/techno/dance sounds?


Apologies if I got the wrong end of the stick then, please feel free to untwist you knickers
At least we are in agreement that the instrument can sometimes be used for electronica/dance type songs.

Here is a link to some of the guitar affects used by Pendulum (apparently), that may be of interest to TS.

http://www.tcelectronic.com/peredur-ap-gwynedd/

Cheers.
#33
Quote by Will Lane
Well since TS hasn't responded to any of our posts we can't know exactly what their goals were, either synthesized sounds from a guitar or supporting guitar in a electronic track.

The first is what I have been talking about; the second is a completely different discussion.


Well he/she has a few things to think on if they come back
#34
Why else would TS be asking if octave fuzz and tremolo (ie effects that could be perceived as giving guitar more of a synth sound since synths commonly have octave layers and dynamic modulation) are good effects for his guitar for electronic/techno/dance sounds?


Why else?

For one, instead of emulation, perhaps the TS is considering how well guitar using those effects would blend with other instruments in a band that plays such music.

After all, octave fuzzes and tremolo pedals predate EDM by a good bit, and can be found in all kinds of non-electronica genres of popular music.
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Feb 25, 2016,
#36
Quote by SpiderM
Apologies if I got the wrong end of the stick then, please feel free to untwist you knickers
At least we are in agreement that the instrument can sometimes be used for electronica/dance type songs.

Here is a link to some of the guitar affects used by Pendulum (apparently), that may be of interest to TS.

http://www.tcelectronic.com/peredur-ap-gwynedd/

Cheers.


Guitars can certainly be used in dance music, especially dance pop where clean guitars are pretty commonly used, even if they are just sort of there. Any instrument or sampled sound could be used. But it's kind of a supplemental thing. Kind of like how a lot of vocal pop music tends to have instrumentation that sort of follows the "well, we can't just not have anything but vocals" philosophy.
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#38
1) nice cover version

2) nice punny name for a show
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!