#1
I have money to spend on recording gear and was wondering if I should start dual mic the guitar. I would need to get another mic and a new interface. Is it worth it and is the tonal difference really worth it? Thanks
#2
Depends on the guitar, really.

Acoustics sound great when stereo mic'd, but electrics don't benefit from micing an amp in stereo; on the other hand, mixing mics on a cab can get a great pallet to build a sound from, whereas acoustics usually become lacklustre when micing the same 'source' with multiple mics.

What do you have in your head for an interface? If you get something with 2 mic pres in it, you can definately do dual mic or stereo recording techniques.

If electric, I'd say a 2 pre interface with something like a 57/i5/pr30 and a large diaphragm condenser (like a C214 or STC-2)

If acoustic, get a stereo pair of 451s or Oktava MK-012s.

What do you have in mind for recording?
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#3
As an afterthought, I'm partial as well to big fat ribbons on electric guitars as well.

My usual micing is a 57 (as per the usual) then directly beside it is an Apex 210 (big, cheap, dark sounding ribbon). Gives me a great amount of bite and midrange to work with, and the ribbon adds some flavor.
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#4
Ribbon? I'm here to learn - what is this? Sorry for my ignorance haha
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#6
Be aware that ribbon mics are not recommended for very loud recording. The ribbon is very sensitive and while they can sound wonderful and warm they also are more delicate, subject to temp and humidity changes and under no circumstances can you make a mistake and zap it with phantom power. Ribbon mics will be destroyed by phantom power so if you plan on using more than one mic at a time make sure your mixer or interface has a switch on each channel to power each mic individually or turn off phantom power. While I love the sound of a ribbon mic especially on acoustic guitars they come with a lot of drawbacks and potential for being easily damaged.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at Feb 25, 2016,
#7
Learn to get a really great recording with one mic first, then experiment with two mics and see if you like it. For electric I prefer one SM 57 off center, off axis. For acoustic I often use 2 condensers in XY pattern.
#8
Quote by Rickholly74
Be aware that ribbon mics are not recommended for very loud recording. The ribbon is very sensitive and while they can sound wonderful and warm they also are more delicate, subject to temp and humidity changes and under no circumstances can you make a mistake and zap it with phantom power. Ribbon mics will be destroyed by phantom power so if you plan on using more than one mic at a time make sure your mixer or interface has a switch on each channel to and power each mic individually or turn off phantom power. While I love the sound of a ribbon mic especially on acoustic guitars they come with a lot of drawbacks and potential for being easily damaged.


There are high-SPL ribbons out there (I think sE makes one, and possibly Shure) but yeah, care is needed with ribbons.
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#9
Quote by Cajundaddy
Learn to get a really great recording with one mic first, then experiment with two mics and see if you like it. For electric I prefer one SM 57 off center, off axis. For acoustic I often use 2 condensers in XY pattern.


Ever experimented with the technique (never remember the name) with 1 mic at the 12th fret and one my the player's right ear pointing at the bridge? I like that one.
Quote by Watterboy
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#10
Ribbons are not as fragile as they used to be, so you can record loud SPL with most modern ones.
I used to record mixing dynamic and condenser to taste, both at about same position on the grille.
If you're blasting the cab you'll need a condenser that has a pad and can handle high SPL.
For leads cobdenbser about a foot from the cab will give you natural reverb, you can also aim speaker sideways at wall and capture slapback reverb from the opposite wall with condenser which can again give you some cool options at mixing stage. This works great for reggae or some ambient clean sounds. You can also mic the back of a cab, which brings in the beef.