#1
I tried to restring my acoustic guitar but some of my bridge pins broke (as usual)
Anyway I bought new bridgepins but somehow they don't seem to fit inside the bride. A part of the pin sticks out of the bridge and I can't push it in any further.

Does anyone know what might cause this?
Are there bridgepins with different sizes?
#2
There are... Once you get the busted ends out take your guitar in to a shop and they'll find ones that fit properly.

Also, what are you doing to break pins? I never broke a pin in 45 years of playing.

There are all sorts of tutorials and tools, but the pro luthier that does the excellent Frets.Com site recommends a simple pair of dykes (side-cutting pliers) No force required... Just slide the ends under the pin enough to grip (NOT cut) and rock it back. They pop right out.
Also....You do not need to force the pins in with any great strength.... Remember, the pin isn't actually holding the string... It's just pushing the ball-end over far enough to be held by the bridge-plate.
#3
Hmm when buying the bridge pins the salesman in the music shop never mentioned different sizes.

I have no idea, I try to pull them out with a guitar winder and they break.
#4
the pins come in 3 and 5 degrees of taper and oversize as well. unless you want to do some detailed measuring, take it to a tech.

what brand of guitar is it?
#5
if the remnants of the old bridge pins are still stuck in the bridge, you can use a coin to push them out from inside the soundhole. if that doesn't work, there's always my old favorite stand-by Semtex... if that doesn't remove it, you didn't need it anyway.
need more gear and a lot more talent(courtesytuxs)
#6
It's a Richwood guitar.

I think I might have found the problem. The bridge pins are a bit too big for my bridge so I am going to try it today with slightly smaller bridge pins and hope it works.
#7
Quote by deathroman13
It's a Richwood guitar.

I think I might have found the problem. The bridge pins are a bit too big for my bridge so I am going to try it today with slightly smaller bridge pins and hope it works.
I doubt that's your problem, but I suppose it could be.

Normally when you start breaking pins, it's because the ball end of the sting is wedged against the pin. You try to use force to get it out, and the head snaps off.

Next time, try this. Cut the strings off, leaving a couple of inches on at the ball end.

Then, take your pliers (*), on push the strings DOWN INTO THE GUITAR!

That will take the sideways stress off the pin, and they should practically fall out afterwards.


(*) I normally use a pair of "lineman's pliers" for the task'

1: They're heavy, and the weight gives some extra downward force.

2: They have cutters, which allows you to dig into the string a bit, so you don't slip and hit the guitar top.

3: For your first couple of tries, you can get some rug padding or similar foam, and cut a slot in it to fit over the pins. That would lessen the chance of doing any damage if you slip.

EDIT: "Slotted" pins are the easiest to deal with at string change time. Bend a "J" curving toward the neck in each string, and route the string down the slot in the pin.

I suppose we could argue all night about which type pins may "sound slightly better",but the tiny improvement, (if any), using solid pins, isn't anywhere near the aggravation they'll cause you.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Feb 25, 2016,
#8
i might add that after you figure out the right taper, check that the wrap actually fits into the slot on your pins. Richwood seems to use slotted pins. Many cheapo pins have dysfunctional slots which don't allow the wrap to fit flush or into the body of the pin. If they stick up above the tapered portion of the pin they will jam into the bridge. Also happens with people who fit big-ass strings on their guitars questing for more "tone" whose string wraps are bigger then the slots in the pins. One thing leads to another, the tools come out, and soon their bridge is cracked.

fyi, un-slotted pins are not for your stock guitar. to use them you will need to cut or have cut for you, string slots in the bridge. bridge slots can be quite useful for correcting ramp angle, repairing neck angle issues, and give you some more pin options but baby steps first. Get the right pins and understand the geometry of what is going on down there. For new builds i prefer unslotted pins with a 3 deg taper. this allows me some leeway to enlarge the hole out to 5 deg in the future if and when the pin hole enlarges due to wear and i can make string slots to improve the break angle as well.

Also, consider trimming the overall length of the pin down. insert pin, reach in with a pencil, feel and mark where the bridge plate meets the pin and scribe a line. take pin out and trim/cut your pin approx 1/16" longer then where your mark is. this will prevent the ball end from using the amount of protruding bridge pin as a lever to jam it into the hole causing removal trouble.

frank ford shows us his method for pesky pin removal:
http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/Musician/Guitar/Setup/SteelStrings/PullPin/pullpin.html

bridge pins in action:
http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/General/Glossary/BridgePins/bridgepins.html

more bridge stuff:
http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/Musician/Guitar/Setup/Saddle/saddle01.html
Last edited by ad_works at Feb 25, 2016,
#9
Thank you all for the advice here.

I have been able to solve my problem.
The new pins I bought were too big indeed.
#10
Quote by ad_works
the pins come in 3 and 5 degrees of taper and oversize as well. unless you want to do some detailed measuring, take it to a tech.

what brand of guitar is it?


Agreed. It can also be noted that there is also a bit of variance in the size of the holes and pins which means that bridge pins can be hole specific. This is a particularly common with wooden pins. I've got a Yamaha with hole specific pins meaning the low E pin only fits the low E string the A pin only fits the A string, and so on. If I try and put the low E int the A spot and it sticks out too far and if I put the A pin into the low E hole then the pin sinks too far into the bridge. So even if you have the right taper on the bridge pins and they are supposedly the right size for the guitar you might have to do some fine tuning with a reamer to make them fit correctly.
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